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  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    You'll never give up, will you?
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    Too old to ride plastic

  2. #27
    'brifter' is a lame word.
    Reputation: cxwrench's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldChipper View Post
    Sure I will! When the manufacturers stop creating more problems than they're solving. It started with the proliferation of BB standard - none of which are better in the long run that threaded - and continues with stooopid and un-needed road discs. If they would continue to make both rim and disc on high-end bikes, I'm OK. Just don't force inferior tech on me so they can make more $$$.
    Various bb standards are definitely not a new thing. Neither are different types of brakes. Everything else w/ brakes has settled on discs, why not bicycles?
    I work for some bike racers
    I've got some bikes, some guns,
    and a bunch of skateboards

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by cxwrench View Post
    Various bb standards are definitely not a new thing. Neither are different types of brakes. Everything else w/ brakes has settled on discs, why not bicycles?
    Because there is a certain subset of cyclists who are fierce Luddites.

  4. #29
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    Bike frames and forks are structurally rated for a maximum disc rotor size. Best to not exceed the rated diameter, even if there seems to be clearance for a larger diameter.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4slomo View Post
    Bike frames and forks are structurally rated for a maximum disc rotor size. Best to not exceed the rated diameter, even if there seems to be clearance for a larger diameter.
    What was the source of this information?

    At first glance I'd question this observation.

  6. #31
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    Check with your frame and fork manufacturer(s) for the maximum brake disc diameter they recommend.

    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    What was the source of this information?

    At first glance I'd question this observation.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    What was the source of this information?

    At first glance I'd question this observation.
    think logically. As the disc diameter gets larger, the caliper also needs to be moved out away from the fork leg further thus creating a higher leverage at its point of attachment at to the fork leg. This causes at least a couple issues. One, caliper will have more movement, more flexy, and 2) easier for caliper to snap off from the fork leg. You don't just make one component bigger without taking into account of the stress it puts on the rest of the system.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    think logically. As the disc diameter gets larger, the caliper also needs to be moved out away from the fork leg further thus creating a higher leverage at its point of attachment at to the fork leg. This causes at least a couple issues. One, caliper will have more movement, more flexy, and 2) easier for caliper to snap off from the fork leg. You don't just make one component bigger without taking into account of the stress it puts on the rest of the system.
    I don't think it's that simple.

    As we go to larger discs the amount of load transfer to the calipers is reduced. The total force possible is limited by tire contact patch friction. Because modern hydraulic disc brakes will easily overpower road bike tires, the caliper load question becomes one of leverage.

    The distance from the road surface to the fulcrum (the axle) remains fixed. The factor that changes is the distance from the fulcrum to the caliper. It increases, thereby reducing the possible load.

    Also, my newer disc brake bikes locate the caliper mounts on the compression side of affected members in such a manner that shear loads on fasteners and connections should be minimal.
    It is the 30 page safety manual on my Cannondale hi-mod that causes me to question the challenged premise. With the seemingly endless ways to kill oneself outlined, I don't recall any reference to changing disc size.

  9. #34
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    Just ordered a bike and the build is using a blend 140 & 160. I googled and saw this isn't unusual. Assume they know what they're doing and didn't question it.

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