Road-ID or Medic-Alert?

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  • 04-30-2019
    Bill Dobie
    I just called his Mom.
  • 04-30-2019
    robc in wi
    I like the idea but $35 for a rubber strap/metal tag is pretty silly. I'm asmatic but they can probably figure out that from the inhaler in my jersey. Carrying my drivers license is free, any other reasonably priced options?
  • 04-30-2019
    Wetworks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by robc in wi View Post
    I like the idea but $35 for a rubber strap/metal tag is pretty silly. I'm asmatic but they can probably figure out that from the inhaler in my jersey. Carrying my drivers license is free, any other reasonably priced options?

    Go back and re-read what I wrote about how traumas are typically handled. I can't speak for the EMTs, but many times in the ED we are the first to discover a patient's identity, but only after we've cut everything off and either stabilized them or taken them to CT scan. So, relying on someone discovering an inhaler or driver's license in the back pocket of a jersey seems like not such a great idea in my experience.
  • 04-30-2019
    PBL450
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Wetworks View Post
    Go back and re-read what I wrote about how traumas are typically handled. I can't speak for the EMTs, but many times in the ED we are the first to discover a patient's identity, but only after we've cut everything off and either stabilized them or taken them to CT scan. So, relying on someone discovering an inhaler or driver's license in the back pocket of a jersey seems like not such a great idea in my experience.

    Yeah, well said! To bring it back to the OP, Iíd go with whatever is the most obvious and has the greatest chance of being found and read. Adding anticoagulants to the question changes a lot. It changes a really lot. You need the nurses and docs to know you are taking that med.
  • 04-30-2019
    BCSaltchucker
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    Yeah, well said! To bring it back to the OP, Iíd go with whatever is the most obvious and has the greatest chance of being found and read. Adding anticoagulants to the question changes a lot. It changes a really lot. You need the nurses and docs to know you are taking that med.

    so, are you saying a medic alert tagged wristband like RoadID is good or just something that will be cut away and discarded long before the people who need to know the Meds can read the tag? If discarded and no good, then does that only leave a tattoo as effective medic-alert?
  • 05-01-2019
    PBL450
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    so, are you saying a medic alert tagged wristband like RoadID is good or just something that will be cut away and discarded long before the people who need to know the Meds can read the tag? If discarded and no good, then does that only leave a tattoo as effective medic-alert?

    Wetworks is better qualified to reply I think... I figure that whatever is better recognized and understood by EMTs and ER RNs is best. Time will matter. Iíd use the most commonly used thing that they see the most.
  • 05-02-2019
    Wetworks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    so, are you saying a medic alert tagged wristband like RoadID is good or just something that will be cut away and discarded long before the people who need to know the Meds can read the tag? If discarded and no good, then does that only leave a tattoo as effective medic-alert?

    As I said, my experience is that everything is cut-off/removed in a trauma situation. Part of that protocol is large bore IV access, something I'm looking for from the crook of your elbow (antecubital), all the way down to your hand. So, if something is on your wrist, I'm going to see it, identify it, and remove it. Hope that helps in your decision-making.
  • 05-02-2019
    PBL450
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Wetworks View Post
    As I said, my experience is that everything is cut-off/removed in a trauma situation. Part of that protocol is large bore IV access, something I'm looking for from the crook of your elbow (antecubital), all the way down to your hand. So, if something is on your wrist, I'm going to see it, identify it, and remove it. Hope that helps in your decision-making.

    So, it is likely to arrive still on? The nurse is cutting everything off in the ER? Iím sure you see medical alert stuff, what is the most common? Necklaces or wrist? Metal or plastic? Bold alert or something you have to look for?

    Sorry to bombard you with question! And thanks for your answers and input! And thanks for being an ER nurse!
  • 05-02-2019
    Wetworks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    So, it is likely to arrive still on? The nurse is cutting everything off in the ER? Iím sure you see medical alert stuff, what is the most common? Necklaces or wrist? Metal or plastic? Bold alert or something you have to look for?

    Sorry to bombard you with question! And thanks for your answers and input! And thanks for being an ER nurse!

    Happy to help, that's why I chose it as a second career!

    In a hospital with Trauma certification, yes, the nurse and anyone else on the trauma team are in the bay cutting everything off, obtaining IV access, VS, and conducting primary and secondary surveys (assessments). EMTs know that, so patients arrive mostly intact from the scene.

    I would have to say that Medic Alert is the most common, with metal bracelets more so than necklaces. That said, I fortunately don't get many in the way of actual cyclists (more the recreational type with no helmet(!) and riding a rental), so I can't speak to having seen a RoadID (or medic alert either) in a cycling situation. But I have seen them (medic alerts) in non-cycling traumas, and what I've described is what happens (at least when I'm in a trauma).
  • 05-03-2019
    BCSaltchucker
    I've had about 5 IVs put in me in the last 4 weeks. none were near the wrist. However they also put a tube in one of my radial arteries - right at the wrist. Last week I was rushed to emergency and they put the IV where they usually do - closer to the elbow on my forearm.
  • 05-03-2019
    Wetworks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    I've had about 5 IVs put in me in the last 4 weeks. none were near the wrist. However they also put a tube in one of my radial arteries - right at the wrist. Last week I was rushed to emergency and they put the IV where they usually do - closer to the elbow on my forearm.

    So that means you have a good AC, which is where we prefer to go. Unfortunately, that often means other people go there too, so it can become sclerotic. My point was, I will look everywhere from the hand to the AC, because access is access; I've put IVs in thumbs when necessary. Anything else (EJ, midline, TLC/central line, femoral) has to be done by a doc.

    An a-line (what you had in your radial) is typically used for real-time BPs. Sorry you had to have one of those placed, they can be quite painful.
  • 05-04-2019
    BCSaltchucker
    open heart surgery. I wasn't aware of anything at the time lol. Though I also had angiogram a couple months before, and that made the artery feel weird and a bit sore for weeks afterwards
  • 05-04-2019
    Methodical
    I'm diabetic and I use the Road ID bracelet and like you, I wanted something that was not so intrusive and soft. I wear it 24/7 and don't even notice it on my wrist. I also carry my drivers license, health insurance card and a credit card and sometimes $20 every time I ride.

    Note: Thanks for the info. on the medical alert badge. I never knew they offered those. I will put in an order soon for one.
  • 05-04-2019
    Methodical
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    The EMTs that attended to me on my one and only ambulance ride told me that they generally only look for the standard medical alert bracelets and necklaces. Things like road I'd and other non-standard things are likely to be ignored

    While that may be true, I just can't phanthom no medical staff personnel would not notice a wrist band and not look at them, especially if they are stripping you down for treatment; someone will be searching for ID. I would think that it's part of the protocol.
  • 05-05-2019
    Paralizer
    I might have some insight into this topic with over 35 years as a paramedic. So the bottom line is this, the type of ID is really not that important as long as you have it on your person. With a patient who is unable to communicate with me a bracelet, pendant, card in wallet, is one of the things I do early on looking for info on the patient. With the increasing use of blood thinners this is more important then ever. Being on a blood thinner, this does not include a daily baby aspirin, means youíre now headed to the trauma center. Having a list of medications and medication allergies gives me, and the hospital staff, important info that lets us make appropriate decisions. So yes, we absolutely do look for these things and they are very helpful.
    A side note I know some do the ICE in cell phones but old timers like me are such luddites we arenít real good at accessing that info, so in my book simple is better.
  • 05-05-2019
    Methodical
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by robc in wi View Post
    ...I'm asmatic but they can probably figure out that from the inhaler in my jersey...

    Not if the inhaler flies out your jersey pocket. People in accident lose shoes and all kinds of stuff. It's your call though.
  • 05-05-2019
    GlobalGuy
    There is a reason that military including those in the most hellacious combat or battles all wear dog tags. There is a reason why everyone knows what a dog tag represents.
  • 05-06-2019
    Finx
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GlobalGuy View Post
    There is a reason that military including those in the most hellacious combat or battles all wear dog tags. There is a reason why everyone knows what a dog tag represents.

    Historically, dog tags are intended to identify individuals remains in war casualty situations. One around the neck, one looped over a toe. Not to inform emergency medical personnel of your medical conditions.

    Future "dog tags" may contain an RFID, Microchip or USB storage of some personal and medical data.
  • 05-06-2019
    GlobalGuy
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    Historically, dog tags are intended to identify individuals remains in war casualty situations. One around the neck, one looped over a toe. Not to inform emergency medical personnel of your medical conditions.

    Uh, yeah I guess that explains why they also have blood type and religious preference.
  • 05-07-2019
    BCSaltchucker
    asked my doctor for my blood type a couple weeks ago, to add to my RoadID. He fumbled with my e-chart, couldn't find it and acted very annoyed that I would even ask. I guess I should have asked while I was in for surgery early this month when they showed me the actual bags of spare blood they had on hand just in case.
  • 05-08-2019
    Methodical
    Hope is not a rare type.

    I need to find my dog tags. I believe I am B+.
  • 05-09-2019
    Deering
    Question for all the EMT folks out there. If you see the blood type on a bracelet or non-official dog tag, do you trust that information? A long time ago I was told that emergency personal would ignore that info as blood typing is a quick process. They would rather test and be sure, then trust the tag. Medication and other health conditions are believed as that cannot be checked/confirmed so quickly.
    Just not sure what info to include on my ID bracelet and if such info isnít going to be used, I donít want to include it.
  • 05-09-2019
    Bremerradkurier
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Deering View Post
    Question for all the EMT folks out there. If you see the blood type on a bracelet or non-official dog tag, do you trust that information? A long time ago I was told that emergency personal would ignore that info as blood typing is a quick process. They would rather test and be sure, then trust the tag. Medication and other health conditions are believed as that cannot be checked/confirmed so quickly.
    Just not sure what info to include on my ID bracelet and if such info isnít going to be used, I donít want to include it.

    I'd be wary of even official dog tags-my hardcopy .mil medical records have some crossed out gibberish with a hand written A+ in the blood type field.