Road-ID or Medic-Alert?
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  1. #1
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    Road-ID or Medic-Alert?

    As of this week I will be on Warfarin for the rest of my life for an artificial heart valve. The hospital has suggested getting a Medic Alert bracelet, which I am not keen on getting.

    I am thinking the Road-ID might be justified. Can put the Warfarin warning on the bracelet as well as using the Road-ID contacting/medical info service. I like how it comes in soft materials, unlike the Medic Alert chains.

    My question is: do the emergency response folks look for/look at Road-ID like they do only the ancient Medic-Alert bracelets?
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  2. #2
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    I don't have any personal experience. You might just call your local Emergency response people, probably Fire Dept, and ask them what there policy is.

  3. #3
    Neophyte
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    A friend of mind that is a paramedic says they absolutely do. If worn on wrist there is almost no chance it gets missed (hrm, I wear mine on ankle). Very useful if patient is unable to answer questions.

    I don't have any medical conditions or allergies and have been lucky to avoid danger on the road but I still feel naked when I run or ride without mine.

  4. #4
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    I am type 2 diabetic and bought a road ID last year. I think you are better with than without and also carry my medicare card (fellow Canuck!) in my jersey.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FasterStronger View Post
    I am type 2 diabetic and bought a road ID last year. I think you are better with than without and also carry my medicare card (fellow Canuck!) in my jersey.
    thanks! good to know.
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisM View Post
    I don't have any personal experience. You might just call your local Emergency response people, probably Fire Dept, and ask them what there policy is.
    This... there are prolly varying policies and "recommended practices" even in the same region (locally, different police departments have different policies for Narcan but EMT seem consistent).

  7. #7
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    Warfarin will impact critical care protocols. Iíd absolutely wear Medic alert. It ainít called nurse or surgeon alert for good reason. Give them EXACTLY what they are accustomed to. Seconds will matter.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  8. #8
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    I wear two "dog tags" that state my name, emergency phone number, blood type, that I have a DLS stent in my left main coronary artery and all my health coverage info. When I was on clopidogrel antiplatelet for one year after the stent implant that was listed.

  9. #9
    gazing from the shadows
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    Make sure it is made of metal, because things get cut off in an emergency situation.

    Wrist or dogtags. But keep in mind dogtags can just look like jewelry, if they spin around to your back in a crash. So I would go wrist myself.

    A quick check of some medical professional discussion sites, the vote goes to wrist most often. FWIW.
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  10. #10
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    A couple of my buddies are E.R. docs, another is an EMT... I asked about Road ID - they've all said "Yes - we look. Yes they help."

    A few of the guys I ride with and I were talking about this. There's a false sense of security when riding with a group. I asked if anyone here knows anyone else's blood type? Nope. Allergies? Nope. Medical history? Nope. Wife's phone number? Nope (after a few jokes). We agreed we were all pretty useless. I said I'd use the downed rider's thumb to open his iPhone and go through the recent calls. Not ideal.

  11. #11
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    As a diabetic I always wear a Medic Alert necklace supplemented with a Road ID bracelet any time I ride. Two reasons for the med alert necklace, one I don't like bracelets/watches and the second, which I hope never comes into play, a hand, hence the bracelet, can be lost and survived but the head, not so much.

    That said, I have ended up in the Emergency room while wearing both, and telling both, the paramedics that scooped me up and the emergency room nurses that I was diabetic, and not having my blood glucose even considered until I finally asked to have it checked. Granted, the stress of the accident will, most likely, raise BG but it still should be monitored.

    I have toyed with the idea of having "diabetic" tattooed on my body somewhere but I'm not a tattoo kind of guy. Well that, and when I mentioned that to my Endocrinologist he chuckled and said "yeah, you can be a diabetic with hepatitis". I guess he's less of a tattoo guy than I am.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #12
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    Two dog tags here, worn around my neck on a beaded ball chain. Mine have little rubber grommets around them so they don't clank. I wear them whenever I ride, which is everywhere everyday

  13. #13
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    The EMTs that attended to me on my one and only ambulance ride told me that they generally only look for the standard medical alert bracelets and necklaces. Things like road I'd and other non-standard things are likely to be ignored

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    The EMTs that attended to me on my one and only ambulance ride told me that they generally only look for the standard medical alert bracelets and necklaces. Things like road I'd and other non-standard things are likely to be ignored
    Maybe it depends on the EMT, but my experience was one of them immediately grabbed the wrist to read my friend's RoadID that included the info that he was on Warfarin and a diabetic.

    Everyone in my family has one that I gave them as a gift. I don't have any medical issues, but wear one whenever I leave home even if it's not bike or exercise related. ICE to reach my wife and medical number.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldZaskar View Post
    A few of the guys I ride with and I were talking about this. There's a false sense of security when riding with a group..
    though I enjoy group rides, I know it is so much more dangerous than riding alone. I've had a number of acquantances killed on one group ride once when a drunk mowed down the whole bunch. My dad ended up in ICU 2 weeks and hospital 6 weeks last year after a squirrelly rider took him out from in front. Being in the group is the opposite of security imho, from my 45 years of riding both ways.

    I still don't know my own blood type, lol. And i just had open heart surgery 9 days ago. Going to ask my GP next week.

    I also don't think my situation on elevated INR d/t Warfarin is nearly as big a deal as folks with diabetes, allergies, pacemakers or on other more critical medications.
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post

    I still don't know my own blood type, lol. And i just had open heart surgery 9 days ago. Going to ask my GP next week.
    Get well soon

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    though I enjoy group rides, I know it is so much more dangerous than riding alone. I've had a number of acquantances killed on one group ride once when a drunk mowed down the whole bunch. My dad ended up in ICU 2 weeks and hospital 6 weeks last year after a squirrelly rider took him out from in front. Being in the group is the opposite of security imho, from my 45 years of riding both ways.

    I still don't know my own blood type, lol. And i just had open heart surgery 9 days ago. Going to ask my GP next week.

    I also don't think my situation on elevated INR d/t Warfarin is nearly as big a deal as folks with diabetes, allergies, pacemakers or on other more critical medications.
    Get well soon! Glad you are on this side of the surgery! Warfarin is an anticoagulant. That can matter a lot in a crash.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  18. #18
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    I was just looking through the MedicAlert webpage. There is a bracelet I'd like to purchase, but when you get to the engraving you have to choose from their pre-made choices on a scroll. There must be THOUSANDS to choose from, but the scroll only shows about 10 at a time, then reloads, then shows another 10, etc. After 10 minutes, I was still in the letter A! It might be HOURS before I found my needs, so I gave up on it.
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  19. #19
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    In the framework of cyclists being involved in some form of collision/accident, with medical info pertinent to that type of patient (trauma), along with familial contacts, I think that having a RoadID is smart.

    Taking the OP's situation into account, here's a simplified overview of what would happen at my hospital (Level 1 Trauma Center) where I am an ED RN. The patient is either going to be a pre-notification arrival or showing up on my door with EMS. Triage is going to get the EMS report, while I'm doing an 'across the room' assessment based simply on the nature of the call/report of "cyclist crashed/hit/etc." Triage or myself are going to ask the following EVERY SINGLE TIME; any report of LOC, are they on blood thinners?

    Now, the circumstances alone are likely going to make this a Level 2 Trauma at my facility regardless of the answers to those questions (speaking from professional and personal experience, lol), so an inability to answer or lack of info displayed won't necessarily make a difference in protocols. But, if there are anticoagulants involved, things have to move justthatmuchquicker.

    As someone mentioned earlier, almost everything gets cut off during a trauma. However, we do not cut off jewelry and the like. We do remove all of it though. Additionally, I am placing IVs in on both arms, so everything from the elbow to the hand is in my line of sight when locating access. With those two factors, I would like to think myself or another RN would recognize pertinent info found on a bracelet located on a wrist.

    Therefore, my vote goes to RoadID.

  20. #20
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    FWIW with this newest generation of artificial heart valve (On-X) I have, I should eventually be able to keep the INR at around 1.5-1.9. Now I understand this is not dramatically higher than a normal person not on anticoagulants (typically INR of 1.1 or less)? https://www.cryolife.com/products/on...ticoagulation/
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post

    I have toyed with the idea of having "diabetic" tattooed on my body somewhere but I'm not a tattoo kind of guy. Well that, and when I mentioned that to my Endocrinologist he chuckled and said "yeah, you can be a diabetic with hepatitis". I guess he's less of a tattoo guy than I am.
    If I went with the tattoo on the chest choice I add one extra line: "Revive Me!"

  22. #22
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    At least in Colorado, our experience is that EMTs and ER staff have no idea what a RoadID is. My wife was in a bad crash a few years ago (fine now), and they had not idea about RoadID and we asked all of them. If the medical professional is an athlete (which we have a better than average chance of here in CO), they might know what one is, but given the importance of knowing you're on warfarin, I'd definitely go with MedicAlert as my first line of defense.
    Well, you know, that's just, like, your opinion man. - The Dude

  23. #23
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    well it turns out my Original Question is redundant!

    Road ID has a Medic-Alert option. It is one of around a dozen companies making Medic-Alert bracelets.

    The key is .. have to order it with the little official Medic-Alert 'badge'. And this badge can be added after the fact too. I just ordered two of the little MA tags to add to my new RoadID bracelet. I feel RoadID should make this a std option for their bracelets, not hidden in the 'accessories' menus elsewhere on their site. I came across this option while viewing an unrelated Youtube video on MedicAlert bracelets.

    https://www.roadid.com/products/badg...nt=47723582794

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  24. #24
    Russian Troll Farmer
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    Would they still put
    'never give up" on the bracelet if it was for a DNR request????
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  25. #25
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    Here is the list of available badges

    https://www.roadid.com/collections/badge
    Last edited by Finx; 04-26-2019 at 02:20 PM.

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