Silly newbie question
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  1. #1
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    Silly newbie question

    Couple of newbie questions:

    1). How do you guys keep your drinks cold? Iíve tried freezing but then I have wait until melted nuff to drink, by then Iím pretty thirsty (it was 100+ degrees on that day). Iíve also just refrigerated but the water warms gets pretty quick on the road. Any ideas?

    2) How many miles does a lube like ProLink last? Iíve been lurking around and reading reviews and posts about ProLink. Overall it seems like a good lube. Iíve ordered a bottle yesterday to check it out. The thing that got me confused is when to lube with it. Iíve notice there a discrepancy in that area. Some people say every other ride, other say about once a week, and there are ever people who claim they can go longer (dozen + rides) between lubes. Now, I assuming the inconsistency can be traced back to the fact these riders put in different mileages per ride. So, I guess the more general question is how do I tell when I need to lube? Iím kind of worry about lube breaking down while Iím on the road, so thatís while Iím trying to figure out miles instead of rides. Also, I donít want to waste lube by lubing to early.

  2. #2
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    1) I don't worry about it and drink it whatever temp it is. They do, however, make insulated bottles.

    2) I'll lube with ProLink after every 4 rides or so (about 30 miles each). If they are longer weekend rides, then more often. To put it in mileage, like you asked, about every 120-150 miles, if it was dry out. Just as important, IMHO, though, is that I will run the chain through a rag after EVERY ride. I do this with the chainrings, too. I'll do the cassette on days that I lube. The chain/chainring wipedown takes about 2 minutes if you're slow. You will pick up black gunk on the rag, guaranteed. This keeps the drivetrain clean and smooth. I'll lube after every wet ride, although I try not to ride if it's raining.
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    Last edited by filly; 02-11-2011 at 04:47 PM.

  3. #3
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    Also, remember that by running the chain through a rag, you're not removing the lube from it's needed areas. In fact, the area where the lube needs to be is not even accessible by the rag. So, wipe and wipe and wipe away. You'll only do more good. You'll keep your chain from picking up road debris.

    Also, with your chain on the bike, lube it on the topside of the bottom section (the section from the bottom jockey wheel to the bottom of your chainring). Put a drop of lube on each roller and then pedal the bike backwards in the bike stand. Doing this method, centrifugal force will draw the lube into the nooks and crannys of the remainer of the chain. Putting the lube on the topside of the top section of exposed chain is not good. Centrifugal force will keep the lube where you put it, and the rest of the chain will not get the goods.
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    Last edited by filly; 02-11-2011 at 04:47 PM.

  4. #4
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    No silly questions

    1). Partially freeze the bottle. Fill about 1/3 of the bottle lay the bottle on its side or at an angle in the freezer. Be careful not to freeze the lid closed. When you are ready to ride fill the bottle and you have a large ice cube in your bottle. Here in Florida the ice lasts about 20 minutes on 90+F days. (In the winter on sub freezing rides, a pinch of salt will keep water from freezing)

    2) Chain lube will last as long as you think it does. If you start hearing chain noises - clean and lube the chain. The easiest way to clean is with a chain cleaning machine like BiBox, Pedro's makes one, Park.... I ride 200-300 miles a week and try to clean and lube every other week whether it needs it or not.

    There are no silly questions. All riders start out as newbies.
    I don't give a damn for a man who can spell a word only one way.
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  5. #5

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    I was thinking about trying the Polar insulated bottles but I've read mixed reviews. I've used the freezing method with my normal water bottles but only with Carbo-Pro fuel, not water. Sounds like a good idea though. The other option is to get a moderately insulated Camelback, which works pretty well for me. I'd have to say err on the side of over-lubing. The less friction the better.

  6. #6
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    Polar's work for me

    Quote Originally Posted by t0adman
    I was thinking about trying the Polar insulated bottles but I've read mixed reviews. I've used the freezing method with my normal water bottles but only with Carbo-Pro fuel, not water. Sounds like a good idea though. The other option is to get a moderately insulated Camelback, which works pretty well for me. I'd have to say err on the side of over-lubing. The less friction the better.
    I've used the Polar's and they definitely will keep your drink colder. Last week I had one Polar, one non-insulated. After an hour, the Polar was still cold, the other one was pretty much piss warm. Anyway, not sure it matter's when your grabbing a quick swig, but it is nice to get a cool drink on a hot ride.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mortman
    I've used the Polar's and they definitely will keep your drink colder. Last week I had one Polar, one non-insulated. After an hour, the Polar was still cold, the other one was pretty much piss warm. Anyway, not sure it matter's when your grabbing a quick swig, but it is nice to get a cool drink on a hot ride.

    I agree, Polars work much better than a regular bottle. In Texas, we ride when it's over 100 degrees and Polar will keep water much cooler than a regular bottle. In the summer months, I take a polar bottle about 7/8 full, with the valve open, and stick it in the freezer overnight. It works great.

    Another benefit to Polar is they don't sweat on the outside of the bottle.
    Dave Hickey/ Fort Worth

    My 3Rensho Blog: http://vintage3rensholove.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
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    ProLink distance

    How many miles you get out of a chain lube is very dependent on your local conditions. If you live in a dusty area, you'll end up doing the wipe/lube/wipe routine with much higher frequency. Any time you get caught in significant wetness, you're looking at a re-lube. I live in a moderately humid local climate, so no dust storms. However, it is a rural area so you do get some agricultural stuff in the air. I consistently go 350 miles between re-lubes. You can figure out it's time to re-lube when the chain noise changes. At my re-lube frequency, I regularly get about 10K miles out of a Campy Record 9 chain, so it clearly is frequent enough.

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