View Poll Results: Do you have SPD pedals on your road bike?

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  • Yes.. and I won't go back

    30 65.22%
  • No.. that's blasphemy

    14 30.43%
  • Neither... I still love my toe-clips

    2 4.35%
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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    These are shin busters


    That should be called meat tenderizer.

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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by frdfandc View Post
    I first started road riding with Candy's and low end MTB shoes. Switched to SPD-SL and road shoes due to foot pain. Still ride road pedals/shoes on my road bike, but before my current bike I rode a shop demo numerous times with SPD's and carbon soled MTB shoes without any issue. The shoes made the difference.So I say stick with what works.
    Yep. When Look deltas came out everybody complained about their shoes flexing. They didn't feel connected. So the shoe manufacturers beefed up their soles to take on the function previously provided by the large area pedal cage.

    Shoe flex isn't as noticeable with rat traps. I once broke a cheap shoe sole while riding. It cracked across the sole right behind the cleat. Hardly felt it coming. That wouldn't happen today.

    Hear tell SPD shoes are also great for walking, probably as good as my brown suede Addidas, but I don't have to clean out the cleat before I jump on the bike. I can instantly modulate shoe flex by loosening or tightening the toe strap. And when I want to show off, break out the leather Maressis, fully laced up since the dawn of cycle sport.

    Marc, "wobbly" is an exaggeration. I mean a feeling of not quite enough lateral support across the leg when under power. Notice pedal surfaces kept getting wider for a while, and added bumpers to spread out the lateral stress? A nice stiff carbon shoe, heck a reasonably stiff SPD shoe, is probably good enough nowadays to provide that function, so it is no longer an issue.

    So SPD are more convenient, and finally as functional as old straps and clips. Roadies still prefer the larger Look style cleats over SPD, though. They're a conservative bunch.

  3. #53
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    SPD Pedals on My Road Bike... Is It Sinful?

    Quote Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
    ^ This! Using platform pedals as a kid on BMX and early mountain bikes has left my shins rather lumpy in my old(er) age

    I'm afraid platform pedals don't seem like a good alternative to SPD or Look compatible pedals for roadies as you can only apply force to the pedal on the down stroke instead of spinning. While most of the power in the pedal stroke is indeed on the down stroke even with clipless pedals, clipless pedals afford you the option of using the entire pedal stroke for some power to the pedal and an opportunity to give your thighs a break. Try doing one-legged drills on a platform pedal
    Why would I use one leg when I can use both legs at the same time? As for the shins... mine are just fine. I hear folks complain about their feet slipping as well. I don’t know, maybe other people are just doing it wrong?

    My point is ride what works for you. If it’s SPDs or egg beaters or toe clips or platforms it’s fine as long as it works.

    This is not my signature
    Last edited by Opus51569; 4 Weeks Ago at 05:36 AM.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy... wait.

  4. #54
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    "Hear tell SPD shoes are also great for walking, probably as good as my brown suede Addidas, but I don't have to clean out the cleat before I jump on the bike. I can instantly modulate shoe flex by loosening or tightening the toe strap."

    In the old days of toe clips and straps I used to have to clean out my cleats on a regular basis - many times having to dislodge a small twig from the cleat channel. It seems to me that I have had to do so with my SPDs far less often - though I occasionally get a small pebble lodged in there instead. Mud has never been a problem with my SPDs - when fresh it just squeezes right on out. One time when mountain biking in the winter I had ice pack up in the cleat - that didn't squeeze out!

    Modulating shoe "flex" these days is handled by loosening or tightening the buckle. I like a snug heel and so keep mine tight.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    I have 4 pair of these, large platform, single side. I am as firmly connected to my bikes as I need to be. My Lake shoes are plenty stiff too!
    This looks like what I use, but the ones I have are double sided (M530s). I find the platform lessens foot numbing on long rides.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    Unless the surprise comes with inability to unclip when stopping, causing you to tip over to that side.
    OK, point taken.

    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    My experience is that the odds of braking a eggbeater spring is about that same as breaking a crank arm and infinitely less than breaking handlebars, frames, wheels, and seat posts. And yet, I continue to use handlebars, frames, wheels, and seat posts--some from the same manufacturer.
    So may I ask what is the most miles you have ever had on a set of Eggbeaters before they needed to be serviced or were toast? And I can't imagine that the soft brass cleat would last very long before needing replacement.

    SPD M530s are cheap enough so when they have a problem, I don't mind just replacing them. But so far, I've never had a problem with any SPDs.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus51569 View Post
    Why would I use one leg when I can use both legs at the same time?
    You're not taking full advantage of all of your leg muscles with a platform pedal.

    By the very nature of the pedal, you can only push down on the pedal and not pull up or spin in circles, which is what single leg drills illustrate. Hence, if your legs get tired of pushing down, good luck... you can't switch to another muscle group to let your thighs rest a little.

    One of my favorite things to do after an intense effort is spin at high RPMs to give my legs a bit of a rest. I would think it'd be nearly impossible to spin at 110+ RPMs using platform pedals(?)

    Anyway, whatever works for you is fine, but I think you're missing-out by not using clipless pedals.


  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
    You're not taking full advantage of all of your leg muscles with a platform pedal.

    By the very nature of the pedal, you can only push down on the pedal and not pull up or spin in circles, which is what single leg drills illustrate. Hence, if your legs get tired of pushing down, good luck... you can't switch to another muscle group to let your thighs rest a little.

    One of my favorite things to do after an intense effort is spin at high RPMs to give my legs a bit of a rest. I would think it'd be nearly impossible to spin at 110+ RPMs using platform pedals(?)

    Anyway, whatever works for you is fine, but I think you're missing-out by not using clipless pedals.

    Great chart!

    Riders don't realize the hip extensors [A] on the butt are fully active from 12 to 3 o'clock and the knee extensors [B] are mainly later, 3 to 5 o'clock. Also ankle plantar flexors [C] on back of calves, kick in at 5 o'clock, sooner than I've expected.

    Something to think about next time I'm out riding, in the quest for that perfect pedal stroke.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
    You're not taking full advantage of all of your leg muscles with a platform pedal.
    Brother, I'm a middle-aged Clydesdale on a road bike... I'm not taking "full advantage" of anything. I'm just trading some potential efficiency for comfort, the ability to ride with any shoe and not be attached to the bike if it falls over.
    Last edited by Opus51569; 3 Weeks Ago at 06:52 AM.
    The Law of Headwinds states: If the ride out is easy... wait.

  10. #60
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    I use XT or XTR SPD's on my road bikes, and I use some shoes that aren't very heavy. I was interested in converting to road pedals to drop some grams, but after looking into it, the SPD setup really isn't that heavy. XT pedals are like 352g and the pair of cleats are 52g IIRC. XTR are about 310g I believe. Some pedals that seem a lot lighter use heavy cleats, and you may even carry around some protectors in your jersey pocket to put on before walking in them. And there are SPD shoes with stiff soles, so I don't understand the reason for a longer pedal. Stiff soles take care of that issue. I'm around 200 lbs, so can't look at pedals with ti axles. I like the double-side entry of SPD also. But feel free to correct me if someone does know of a pedal system that drops about 100g or more from an XTR SPD setup (pedal + cleat setup).

    EDIT- Well, I think I answered my own question- Looks like dedicated road shoes can be easily 200g lighter than SPD shoes that have a thick enough tread to 'bury' the cleat to make them walkable.
    Last edited by Wheelspeed; 3 Weeks Ago at 10:30 AM. Reason: New info

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wheelspeed View Post
    But feel free to correct me if someone does know of a pedal system that drops about 100g or more from an XTR SPD setup (pedal + cleat setup).
    I can assure you that you will not notice a 100g difference, seriously. That is less than 1/4 of a pound. A few pounds off the engine will make a much bigger difference.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    I can assure you that you will not notice a 100g difference, seriously. That is less than 1/4 of a pound. A few pounds off the engine will make a much bigger difference.

    Yep. The spring in your step would be quickly cancelled out by that damn chain.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
    You're not taking full advantage of all of your leg muscles with a platform pedal.

    By the very nature of the pedal, you can only push down on the pedal and not pull up or spin in circles, which is what single leg drills illustrate. Hence, if your legs get tired of pushing down, good luck... you can't switch to another muscle group to let your thighs rest a little.

    One of my favorite things to do after an intense effort is spin at high RPMs to give my legs a bit of a rest. I would think it'd be nearly impossible to spin at 110+ RPMs using platform pedals(?)

    Anyway, whatever works for you is fine, but I think you're missing-out by not using clipless pedals.

    this has been largely debunked. Cyclists do not pull up on the pedals, except for maybe sprinters in a sprint
    https://roadcyclinguk.com/how-to/bik...-the-upstroke/
    https://www.bikeradar.com/gear/artic...-pedals-45868/
    Myth of Pedaling Circles | Burnham Coaching

    I just really prefer being clipped in on road bikes because there is less effort keeping the feet in place, and the axle-ball-of-foot geometry can remain ideal. But I only ride flats on the MTB
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    this has been largely debunked. Cyclists do not pull up on the pedals, except for maybe sprinters in a sprint
    https://roadcyclinguk.com/how-to/bik...-the-upstroke/
    https://www.bikeradar.com/gear/artic...-pedals-45868/
    Myth of Pedaling Circles | Burnham Coaching

    I just really prefer being clipped in on road bikes because there is less effort keeping the feet in place, and the axle-ball-of-foot geometry can remain ideal. But I only ride flats on the MTB
    Yep, Bicycling did tests on how hard spinners were pulling up and found they were raising the feet just enough to unweight the pedal, but not enough to add force. It still feels nice knowing these muscles are there, controlled, called upon when desired. Classic roadies used to regain contact with those muscles riding indoor track on fixies during the winter, heard tell.

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    this has been largely debunked. Cyclists do not pull up on the pedals, except for maybe sprinters in a sprint
    https://roadcyclinguk.com/how-to/bik...-the-upstroke/
    https://www.bikeradar.com/gear/artic...-pedals-45868/
    Myth of Pedaling Circles | Burnham Coaching

    I just really prefer being clipped in on road bikes because there is less effort keeping the feet in place, and the axle-ball-of-foot geometry can remain ideal. But I only ride flats on the MTB
    ^This.^ The main advantage is not having to concentrate of staying connected with the pedals.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #66
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    I run high quality flat pedals and feel that you can pedal circles, if that’s what you wanna call it.

    But I find that what you are really doing is similar to scraping mud off your shoe on the up stroke and not really lifting up on your foot.

    For this motion, a good flat pedal with a good flat specific shoe works phenomenally.

    The best thing I ever did was switch to flats. It allows me to place my foot exactly where I want it on the pedal.

    I slowly swapped all my bikes over, even the roadies.

    I never thought I’d switch to flats ever, but as they say, “never say never”!

    I have lots of shimano road pedals and time mtb. Pedals and some very high end specialized shoes I’ll never use if anyone needs a setup.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I run high quality flat pedals and feel that you can pedal circles, if that’s what you wanna call it.

    But I find that what you are really doing is similar to scraping mud off your shoe on the up stroke and not really lifting up on your foot.

    For this motion, a good flat pedal with a good flat specific shoe works phenomenally.

    The best thing I ever did was switch to flats. It allows me to place my foot exactly where I want it on the pedal.

    I slowly swapped all my bikes over, even the roadies.

    I never thought I’d switch to flats ever, but as they say, “never say never”!

    I have lots of shimano road pedals and time mtb. Pedals and some very high end specialized shoes I’ll never use if anyone needs a setup.
    Well, keeping the foot flat on the pedals and letting them move the legs on the upstroke is about right, but whenever I've gone flat pedals, sooner or later, usually in an acceleration, one foot will come off the pedal on the upstroke.

    Hardly ever clip out, so the legs feel like an extension of the crank and I forget about them. Of course it wasn't that hard to keep the feet on the pedals before I got toe straps.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 3 Weeks Ago at 04:35 PM.

  18. #68
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    Whenever I am trying to put in extra effort and remain seated on the bike I find myself concentrating on putting that effort in the upstroke. It may be a subconscious effort to try and get some extra use out of the muscles that have not been working as hard, but it is noticeable.

    I've seen those studies and had people tell me that they prove you don't pull on the upstroke - but my muscles tell me otherwise.
    Life is short... enjoy the ride.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradkay View Post
    Whenever I am trying to put in extra effort and remain seated on the bike I find myself concentrating on putting that effort in the upstroke. It may be a subconscious effort to try and get some extra use out of the muscles that have not been working as hard, but it is noticeable.

    I've seen those studies and had people tell me that they prove you don't pull on the upstroke - but my muscles tell me otherwise.
    So do mine!

    There are degrees of pull. Look at trackies on fixed gears, you have to wonder about power on the upstroke. They HAVE to follow the crank around or the bike stops. That takes muscular co-ordination freewheel bikes never demand.
    Last edited by Fredrico; 3 Weeks Ago at 08:53 PM.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    So do mine!

    There are degrees of pull. Look at trackies on fixed gears, you have to wonder about power on the upstroke. They HAVE to follow the crank around or the bike stops. That takes muscular co-ordination freewheel bikes never demand.

    Not really. We have on-bike power meters--and folks have studied these things.

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  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Not really. We have on-bike power meters--and folks have studied these things.

    https://thefixedgear.wordpress.com/2...y-of-cyclists/
    Besidds, if you stop pedaling on a fixed gear at a high cadence, the bike doesn't stop right away, it waits until it tries to rip your legs off! Ask me how I know this.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

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  22. #72
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    I've seen this whole debate over what makes better pedaling efficiency, i.e. using flats vs being clipped in, discussed many times over on the interwebs. Usually I've seen the conversation take place in the context of mtb riders. Yes it is certainly true that you can ride anything in flats, but usually the people that claim riding flats is better are not guys who are X-C racing, rather it is guys riding technical terrain or are not racing.

    The fact is that the majority of the time riding tempo while seated a rider does not pull on the upstroke at all. But there definitely are times where you do, namely when trying to accelerate hard. The most common scenario where riding flats will challenge that you keep your foot on the pedal is when getting out of the saddle and driving hard, i.e. in a sprint or on a steep uphill grade. Yes you can still pedal smoothly with flats and keep your foot on the pedal, but a rider with feet firmly attached to the pedal is going to be able to just ride away from you.

    There's no mystery as to why every track/road/mtb racer wants his feet firmly attached to the pedal, and why bike racers have been doing it for over 100 years. It allows for maximum power to be put to the pedals whenever you want. I've known track riders that use clipless pedals AND add additional straps just ensure that their feet stay firmly intact when they go into max sprint mode.

    I would also submit that for X-C and somewhat technical mtb riding that being clipped in is safer. You do not want your foot to come off the pedal, with all of the rough terrain and getting thrown around, as having your feet come off for whatever reason significantly reduces your ability to control the bike.

  23. #73
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    I don't see SPD's as an advantage or disadvantage on the bike. It does make it easier to walk around when not on the bike.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by PoorInRichfield View Post
    I've been primarily a "roadie" for almost 30 years (yikes!) and ever since the LOOK pedal & cleat was invented, that style of pedal (i.e., LOOK-compatible) has been my pedal of choice on my road bikes. However, I opted for SPD-style pedals on my CX/gravel/trail bikes because I want to be able to walk when off the bike.
    So you don't want to be able to walk when you're off your road bike?!?!

  25. #75
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    ah yes the roadie shoe hobble. I do it every cafe I stop at. Registered with the ministry of silly walks.
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

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