Is this Specialized Future Shock 500 hrs thing true?
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  1. #1
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    Is this Specialized Future Shock 500 hrs thing true?

    Is this Specialized Future Shock 500 hrs thing true?

    Or is it all poppycock/bollox??

    https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycl...500-hours.html


    I've seen some people with this future shock on their Specialized, and they love it (or swear by it when we, albeit rarely, hit pave'). But most of them have 2017/2018 Specialized bikes, with probably less than 5K miles on the bikes. The only time I see them on their Specialized Roubaix bikes is when it is known the kermesse race and/or club ride is going to be hitting lots of pave sections. All other times, most of these people are on a different bikes, which honestly is a significant amount of the time since pave (for those who live & ride here in Belgium/Netherlands) is avoided as much as possible....even by kermesse organizers Sure, region-visitors/curiosity-seekers/truly-sadists ride pave as part of their ride. You see them only occasionally though (unless it is a specific rando geared for that). They are usually noticeable by their grinning under-their-helmet like Jack N. in the The Shining . Can only imagine what's is going on and/or has happened in their cerebral cortex.


    Anyhow, 500 hrs? Future Shock? Wouldn't that be way less than even one year for those that ride the bike with Future Shock regularly? Maybe the replacement of 500 hrs is based on how truly rough the tarmac is that one rides? And not just some absolute "500 hr ridden" thing??

    Any Future Shock riders out there can comment??

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Is this Specialized Future Shock 500 hrs thing true?

    Or is it all poppycock/bollox??

    https://www.bikeforums.net/road-cycl...500-hours.html


    I've seen some people with this future shock on their Specialized, and they love it (or swear by it when we, albeit rarely, hit pave'). But most of them have 2017/2018 Specialized bikes, with probably less than 5K miles on the bikes. The only time I see them on their Specialized Roubaix bikes is when it is known the kermesse race and/or club ride is going to be hitting lots of pave sections. All other times, most of these people are on a different bikes, which honestly is a significant amount of the time since pave (for those who live & ride here in Belgium/Netherlands) is avoided as much as possible....even by kermesse organizers Sure, region-visitors/curiosity-seekers/truly-sadists ride pave as part of their ride. You see them only occasionally though (unless it is a specific rando geared for that). They are usually noticeable by their grinning under-their-helmet like Jack N. in the The Shining . Can only imagine what's is going on and/or has happened in their cerebral cortex.


    Anyhow, 500 hrs? Future Shock? Wouldn't that be way less than even one year for those that ride the bike with Future Shock regularly? Maybe the replacement of 500 hrs is based on how truly rough the tarmac is that one rides? And not just some absolute "500 hr ridden" thing??

    Any Future Shock riders out there can comment??
    I guess it really is a "Future Shock" because after 500 hours into the future you'll be shocked to find out you bike needs a repair

  3. #3
    tlg
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    Do you have this in any official Specialized documentation?

    From your link.
    Specialized calls for the Future Shock to be serviced every 500 hours. And by service they mean replace the entire Future Shock cartridge. It is not intended to be taken apart and cleaned and regreased.
    It's just a spring piston. This video shows how to take it apart and lube it. Looks pretty basic. MTB shocks typically call for much more frequent maintenance (although those are air/oil shocks)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fIi6s6_YqL0

    Another post in your link
    I talked to a few other Specialized stores, some of which are large specialized concept stores, and none of them had been told by Specialized that this is a maintenance part.
    If it were me, I'd clean and lube it occasionally and check it for play. If no play, I'd keep using it.
    It's not clear to me whether is uses bushings or bearings and if they're replaceable. Some of the posts in your link talk about needle bearings. I don't see any or that needle bearings could possibly fit. Looks like white guide bushings to me.

    Last edited by tlg; 05-07-2018 at 06:21 AM.
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    I would be shocked if this is true.

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    Sounds like one more thing that can go wrong. It also sounds like Specialized was not upfront about maintenance....um, I mean replacement of the cartridge every 500 hours. So they wait for you to go down the rabbit hole, then they hit you with this.

    And who the heck measures the hours they are on the bike? Does the Futureshock thingy give you any warning before the cartridge is about to self destruct?

    Personally, I would pass and get a bike with room for wider tires instead.
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    That’s probably an aggressive CYA figure like any maintenance interval. Your car is not going to die just because it misses its 10000mi or 1yr service, neither will a FutureShock.

    500 hours is roughly 10 hours of riding a week for a while year. I don’t think that’s a huge issue. Springs also don’t just go bad or lose tension either so I have no reason to expect them to fail.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by factory feel View Post
    I would be shocked if this is true.
    Did you fall out of the corny humor tree this week?
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Sounds like one more thing that can go wrong. It also sounds like Specialized was not upfront about maintenance....um, I mean replacement of the cartridge every 500 hours. So they wait for you to go down the rabbit hole, then they hit you with this.

    And who the heck measures the hours they are on the bike? Does the Futureshock thingy give you any warning before the cartridge is about to self destruct?

    Personally, I would pass and get a bike with room for wider tires instead.
    Actually lots of serious riders look at hours in the saddle vs miles. Calculated on free Strava if you use it and easy to check.

  9. #9
    tlg
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    Quote Originally Posted by robc in wi View Post
    Actually lots of serious riders look at hours in the saddle vs miles. Calculated on free Strava if you use it and easy to check.
    That doesn't work if you have multiple bikes. Strava combines time of all bikes.

    Strava "My Gear" tracks your bikes / components individually. Works great, but only option for mileage, not hours.

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    So the shock needs to be serviced every 500 hours?
    120 pound rider on a smooth bike path or 270 pound rider bombing trails hitting roots and rocks.....500 hours. um, sure. Sounds like a very wild guess to me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    That doesn't work if you have multiple bikes. Strava combines time of all bikes.

    Strava "My Gear" tracks your bikes / components individually. Works great, but only option for mileage, not hours.

    Your right, good point. I have several road bikes but do probably 90% on one though.

  12. #12
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    Is this an 'it's working or it isn't" component or does it come with symptoms/ tell-tales of the end of its service life?
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  13. #13
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    bah, just ride it till is starts failing and replace it. I did about 220 hours last year, though I don't have a Roubaix.

    My wife does have a Roubaix. The thing came with 3 different springs for the top half of the cartridge one of which we installed - the light one installed in a minute. It came covered in grease, so I imagine just keep both springs greased and get long life. super simple mechanism.

    $55 is what I pay for one tire, and get about 200 hours out of one on the rear.
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    500 hours is 7500 to 10000 miles of riding (15-20mph average). So 1-3 years at specialized CYA replacement schedule. I don't really consider 10000 miles a year average or typical though, so for your average cyclist that would pick a roubaix over a more aggressive bike you will probably get 2-4 years out of it if it was your only bike which seems reasonable.
    Last edited by taodemon; 05-09-2018 at 05:56 AM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by taodemon View Post
    500 hours is 7500 to 10000 miles of riding (15-20mph average). So 1-3 years at specialized CYA replacement schedule. I don't really consider 10000 miles a year average or typical though, so for your average cyclist that would pick a roubaix over a more aggressive bike you will probably get 2-4 years out of it if it was your only bike which seems reasonable.
    Though keep in mind that if you normally ride more hilly terrain, most people won't be riding a 15-20mph average.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Though keep in mind that if you normally ride more hilly terrain, most people won't be riding a 15-20mph average.
    Yes, If you ride in the mountains all year or are a much slower rider that could be the case. My 62yo dad (only started biking at 58) managed an 18mph average riding in MA with 292k ft of climbing over 6k miles, which isn't an extreme amount of climbing by any means but definitely not a flat lander either so 15mph should still be pretty attainable by your average rider on "average" terrain.

    You are still going to change tires/chain more often and depending on cost of the spring (no idea what it costs to replace) you can always cheap out and use one of the harder/softer ones that come with the bike before you actually have to spend anything.

    You have the 3 springs that are good for 1500 CYA hours, and depending on rider weight/road conditions I wouldn't doubt if you couldn't get double that time out of them, it isn't like too many of us regularly ride cobbles.

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    You know, as I mentioned, when I see these guys on their Specialized Roubaix with FutureShock, it is always when it is known the ride/race is hitting cobbles or pave-with-clothes sections (explained later). Everyone I've asked swears by thing, a few mentioned that is is better than the Domane's frontend (but I truly wonder how they know that).

    Anyhow, I guess 500 hrs wouldn't be a bad thing if you were only pulling the bike out every so often, which is what all the guys I know who have the Spesh FutureShock do. Any other times, they are all on different bikes. I gotta admit, I am wondering now, and curious. I am getting older now, and these pave sections, especially the ones not maintained well, and also the so-called "pave with clothes" streets/sections (these are streets where Belgium couldn't see fit to dig up the pave, so they tried to lay a thin layer of asphalt over it, and then leave it go for years, and, well, let me just say they are nearly as nasty as outright pave)...both of these tarmacs beat the living pee out of me when we hit them (on those days, I am on my titanium running 28mm rubber).

    Just wish Specialized made the Roubaix with Futureshock without forcing me to go to disc brakes. I am not ready to go there (disc) yet, so it looks like a no-go for me. I guess I could go the route of getting a Diverge, which has the Futureshock and is offered in a frame with rim brakes.....but I am not one who gets off to take the road less well traveled, which is what the Diverge is for.

    Thanks everyone for responding.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    I am getting older now, and these pave sections, especially the ones not maintained well, and also the so-called "pave with clothes" streets/sections (these are streets where Belgium couldn't see fit to dig up the pave, so they tried to lay a thin layer of asphalt over it, and then leave it go for years, and, well, let me just say they are nearly as nasty as outright pave)...both of these tarmacs beat the living pee out of me when we hit them......
    Now you know. Isn't getting older fun??

    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    (on those days, I am on my titanium running 28mm rubber).
    And what is wrong with that? As you know, I run my Cannondale Synapse Carbon with 700x28 tires.

    Quote Originally Posted by BelgianHammer View Post
    Just wish Specialized made the Roubaix with Futureshock without forcing me to go to disc brakes. I am not ready to go there (disc) yet, so it looks like a no-go for me. I guess I could go the route of getting a Diverge, which has the Futureshock and is offered in a frame with rim brakes.....but I am not one who gets off to take the road less well traveled, which is what the Diverge is for.
    Well, I have to admit that while for a long time, I dismissed disc brakes as unnecessary. Then I owned a hydraulic disc brake gravel bike and have actually grown to like them. Not that there is anything wrong with good rim brakes like Ultegra 6800s, but hydraulic disc brakes have excellent modulation, braking power and being hydraulic, they are self adjusting as the pads wear. The downside is that you have to be extra careful not to pull a brake lever when the wheel is out or the adjustment will be out of whack.

    My point is not to argue one type of brake over another here. My point is that a bike decision should not be made because of whether it has rim or disc brakes - with the possible exception that I would avoid mechanical disc brakes.

    If you don't want to go to a gravel bike, you should look into the 2018 Cannondale Synapse Carbon (disc brakes) which has clearance for 32mm tires. Another road bike worthy of a look is the Jamis Quest Elite Steel (rim brakes) which I believe can take 30mm tires.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    The downside is that you have to be extra careful not to pull a brake lever when the wheel is out or the adjustment will be out of whack.
    Or.... the piston will pop right out of the caliper. Dumping hydraulic fluid all over the floor.
    not that I've ever done that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tlg View Post
    Or.... the piston will pop right out of the caliper. Dumping hydraulic fluid all over the floor.
    not that I've ever done that.
    Yikes! I've never done that thank goodness! The worst that happened to me was when I removed the front wheel to put the bike in the back of the car. The front lever was inadvertently pulled and when I re-installed the wheel - brake rub! At the time, I didn't know much about disc brakes, so back to the shop where I bought it. They spread the calipers and all was good.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  21. #21
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    FYI. 2019 Future shock has new lower progressive spring and upper spring not needed. It comes with 3 upper springs to add more stiffness if desired. Now delivered without upper spring.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Sounds like one more thing that can go wrong. It also sounds like Specialized was not upfront about maintenance....um, I mean replacement of the cartridge every 500 hours. So they wait for you to go down the rabbit hole, then they hit you with this.

    And who the heck measures the hours they are on the bike?
    Does the Futureshock thingy give you any warning before the cartridge is about to self destruct?

    Personally, I would pass and get a bike with room for wider tires instead.
    Cough-Strava-cough

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    By this post I hope to help others understand one potential maintenance item (and possible drawback of the Future Shock (FS) system ...

    I just experienced a terminal problem with a FS cartridge in a 2018 Diverge. Not that many hours into the bike (which bike btw I REALLY like), maybe only 4,000 miles, the unit began sticking, operation became unbearably rough and was rapidly getting worse. This happened after a year hard riding in the Florida heat (light touring & gravel riding), and - as I discovered - the issue failure is almost certainly due to me constantly dripping "toxic" forehead/chin sweat right onto the top of the steerer tube & FS cartridge.

    The simple part of the FS cartridge is the progressive rate spring that can be swapped out / is greased in the cartridge, etc., etc. That part's not the issue at all; it's probably indestructible / is not the more complex moving part of the FS system that failed on my bike. After pulling the cartridge out and then noting that the bottom of the cartridge was dripping with lots of cancerous rust -- at a level that clearly signaled total internal destruction -- I disassembled the bottom of the FS cartridge.

    IMPORTANT - that bottom end of the cartridge is NOT user servicable. But the damage was so evident and severe that I decided I had nothing to lose except to figure out what on earth happened - so I could possibly prevent this from happening again / avoid issues with a new replacement FS cartridge (which I'm presently trying to track down). BTW, since Specialized's warranty does nor cover "corrosion" (a fact I learned after a Roval rear hub on my Tarmac began to bubble / shed its paint), I wasn't going to spend hours of frustration trying to get the FS cartridge replaced under warranty.

    It was immediately evident on FS disassembly that the roller bearings and their races were completely corroded. These 3 banks, each of 13 roller bearings, are the fairly complex, hidden (and non-user servicable) mechanism that allows the outer race of the inner shaft to move up/down within the outer FS cylinder (hope that gibberish is clear). So - since the bike design is utterly dependent on having a FS cartridge - my only hope to avoid having to pay for / find a new cartridge every one or 2 riding seasons is to devise some kind of cover over my replacement cartridge that would divert my sweat from seeping into the top of the cartridge (clearly around the circumference of inner shafting, despite a close-fitting, but not sweat-proof, rubber boot. I hope some Specialized engineer takes this comment to heart and the company avoids the mistake of dismissing this as a crank complaint. It's a weakness inherent in the design - but one that a good engineering staff can remedy (perhaps a really watertight seal at the top?). The Diverge is a great, useful bike. So I hope this item can and will be improved.

    BTW - the dealer parts system says the FS cartridge is $125. But it shows as no stock at all in the company's system?! I'm really hoping that just isn't correct, as the dealer is helpfully trying to hunt one down for me. Very Interesting Note: I just discovered that the collar / clamping mechanism that holds the FS cartridge into the steerer tube is under recall as failure would mean loss of steering. 3 guesses as to the issue being addressed in the recall - yep! susceptibility to corrosion and failure. Waterproofing the top of the rubber boot may help that as well. I'm actually glad my FS system signaled signs of slow destruction early, as now I can remedy that as well without having to learn the very hard and painful way. Hope this helps someone.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamRider View Post
    By this post I hope to help others understand one potential maintenance item (and possible drawback of the Future Shock (FS) system ...

    I just experienced a terminal problem with a FS cartridge in a 2018 Diverge. Not that many hours into the bike (which bike btw I REALLY like), maybe only 4,000 miles, the unit began sticking, operation became unbearably rough and was rapidly getting worse. This happened after a year hard riding in the Florida heat (light touring & gravel riding), and - as I discovered - the issue failure is almost certainly due to me constantly dripping "toxic" forehead/chin sweat right onto the top of the steerer tube & FS cartridge.

    The simple part of the FS cartridge is the progressive rate spring that can be swapped out / is greased in the cartridge, etc., etc. That part's not the issue at all; it's probably indestructible / is not the more complex moving part of the FS system that failed on my bike. After pulling the cartridge out and then noting that the bottom of the cartridge was dripping with lots of cancerous rust -- at a level that clearly signaled total internal destruction -- I disassembled the bottom of the FS cartridge.

    IMPORTANT - that bottom end of the cartridge is NOT user servicable. But the damage was so evident and severe that I decided I had nothing to lose except to figure out what on earth happened - so I could possibly prevent this from happening again / avoid issues with a new replacement FS cartridge (which I'm presently trying to track down). BTW, since Specialized's warranty does nor cover "corrosion" (a fact I learned after a Roval rear hub on my Tarmac began to bubble / shed its paint), I wasn't going to spend hours of frustration trying to get the FS cartridge replaced under warranty.

    It was immediately evident on FS disassembly that the roller bearings and their races were completely corroded. These 3 banks, each of 13 roller bearings, are the fairly complex, hidden (and non-user servicable) mechanism that allows the outer race of the inner shaft to move up/down within the outer FS cylinder (hope that gibberish is clear). So - since the bike design is utterly dependent on having a FS cartridge - my only hope to avoid having to pay for / find a new cartridge every one or 2 riding seasons is to devise some kind of cover over my replacement cartridge that would divert my sweat from seeping into the top of the cartridge (clearly around the circumference of inner shafting, despite a close-fitting, but not sweat-proof, rubber boot. I hope some Specialized engineer takes this comment to heart and the company avoids the mistake of dismissing this as a crank complaint. It's a weakness inherent in the design - but one that a good engineering staff can remedy (perhaps a really watertight seal at the top?). The Diverge is a great, useful bike. So I hope this item can and will be improved.

    BTW - the dealer parts system says the FS cartridge is $125. But it shows as no stock at all in the company's system?! I'm really hoping that just isn't correct, as the dealer is helpfully trying to hunt one down for me. Very Interesting Note: I just discovered that the collar / clamping mechanism that holds the FS cartridge into the steerer tube is under recall as failure would mean loss of steering. 3 guesses as to the issue being addressed in the recall - yep! susceptibility to corrosion and failure. Waterproofing the top of the rubber boot may help that as well. I'm actually glad my FS system signaled signs of slow destruction early, as now I can remedy that as well without having to learn the very hard and painful way. Hope this helps someone.
    Maybe you can design and patent a new product - the FSC (Future Shock Condom).
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  25. #25
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    500 hours is a lot even for someone who rides a lot unless it’s their only bike

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