strictly road,...or hybrid
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  1. #1

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    strictly road,...or hybrid

    Hello,

    I'm sure you'll are tiered of newbie questions, but here's one more for ya'll. I'm rideing in a bike tour that is only 150 miles o couple months from now. The problem is I don't have a bike. Now I'm highly considering getting a road bike that is fitting for a little off roading. I don't want to invest in something that is restricted to only nicely paved roads. From what I hear you can't go off a paved course what-so-ever with a road bike. So if you guys don;t mind giving a little feed back, what's your opinions? Road bike or cyclcross?

  2. #2
    NeoRetroGrouch
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    How "off road" ?...

    Quote Originally Posted by littletommy2
    Hello,

    I'm sure you'll are tiered of newbie questions, but here's one more for ya'll. I'm rideing in a bike tour that is only 150 miles o couple months from now. The problem is I don't have a bike. Now I'm highly considering getting a road bike that is fitting for a little off roading. I don't want to invest in something that is restricted to only nicely paved roads. From what I hear you can't go off a paved course what-so-ever with a road bike. So if you guys don;t mind giving a little feed back, what's your opinions? Road bike or cyclcross?
    If your looking at a well maintained non-paved bike path, a road bike with 25 or 28 tires would be fine. Just make sure the frame you get has room for a little wider tire.

    For less maintained paths or light single track, a cyclocross bike would be (and is) my choice. A cyclocross (CX) bike is a road style frame with more room between the stays, fork and brakes for wider tires. One set of tires for the road and another in the 30 to 38 range for the trails. Having an extra set of wheels with the tires mounted makes it even handier. I use this bike for 95% of my riding, both on and off road.

    That said, my first bike was a $308 hybrid and it was the best biking decision I ever made. I used it on everything from a century on the road to some pretty serious single track until I found what I wanted to do.

    Hope this helps,
    TF
    "Don't those guys know they're old?!!"
    Me, off the back, at my first 50+ road race.

  3. #3

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    You might want to consider a "Flat Bar" road bike - one with flat handle bars, twist shifters, and a more upright seating position. They usually have wider tires, and are better on varied terrain. One example is the Jamis Coda.

  4. #4
    Every little counts...
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    Or, for the cyclocross option, the Jamis Nova. I use mine to race cross, winter train. Great with fat tires and fenders for touring also.

    I see a cross bike as a more viable option than a hybrid.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spunout
    Or, for the cyclocross option, the Jamis Nova. I use mine to race cross, winter train. Great with fat tires and fenders for touring also.

    I see a cross bike as a more viable option than a hybrid.
    The Nova is an excellent bike. For us old guys (60), the more upright position of the Coda is easier on or backs!

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Touring Bike?

    You might consider a touring bike.

    I don't have one myself, but I've ridden with a couple of guys who have them and they ride them just about anywhere there's a path.

    I was riding on a tour in Arizona with a guy who took off on a 40-mile fire trail "short-cut" with his Trek touring bike with no problem. I don't know the model, but it was full tourer with fenders and a rack. His rear tire was a 28.

    Having had a hybrid, I don't think you'd want to go with one if you're going to be doing any decent amount of road riding -- they feel too slow after awhile.
    Last edited by StewartK; 02-26-2004 at 11:17 AM. Reason: My Cybersitter program edited out the word "model".

  7. #7
    Game on, b*tches!
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    A cross bike, for sure.

    They are the "jack of all trades" of bicycles. You can do most anything with a crosser.
    Originally Posted by tetter
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  8. #8

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    3 years into it

    I recommend a cyclo-cross bike.

    I started mtbing about 3.5 years ago. I bought a Jamis Coda to do some road miles. It was a cool bike. However, within 6 months I was ready for much more mileage. I bought a used road bike. I kept the Coda for commuting and shorter winter training rides. Then I lost the Coda in a car accident. With the insurance money, I bought a Lemond Poprad frame and a good durable wheelset (XT hubs / Mavic Open Pro rims). I built the bike up with the re-useable Coda components and drop bars. I put a riser stem on it to make it a little more comfortable and still areo-dynamic. Now, I am ready to upgrade the original triple chain ring to a 36/47 cyclo-cross set up.

    It is a good ride for a lot of different occasions. It will be a struggle to decide between that bike and my aluminum race bike to use for some of my summer ultra-endurance excursions.

    In the short: a cyclo-cross bike will allow you to do a lot more than you are currently expecting to do, without having to constantly spend money on upgrades to meet your needs.

  9. #9
    NeoRetroGrouch
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    And if a CX, get a triple...

    There's no valid reason not to and you will appreciate the gearing. Unless your going to race CX, you don't need the closer true CX front end (i.e. 48-39) and, most of all, don't fall for the latest fashion statement with a compact crankset (50-34). A triple works just fine and gives you the full range of gearing.

    TF
    Last edited by TurboTurtle; 02-26-2004 at 01:43 PM.
    "Don't those guys know they're old?!!"
    Me, off the back, at my first 50+ road race.

  10. #10
    SoCal--S Beach to the Dam
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barton
    You might want to consider a "Flat Bar" road bike - one with flat handle bars, twist shifters, and a more upright seating position. They usually have wider tires, and are better on varied terrain. One example is the Jamis Coda.
    I have a near new flatbar Felt for sale.

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