Strobes at night
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  1. #1
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    Strobes at night

    Do new school high intensity lights come with any instructions? Running them in strobe mode at night blinds oncoming traffic. Not what you'd want riding towards a car. Just saying

  2. #2
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    I think the impact depends on the light, settings, and installation. I run strobes at night, front and rear on the bike. Solid lights are on the helmet front and rear.

    The front strobe is set to a lower setting and aimed down at the road, away from oncoming cars. I want drivers to know it's a bicycle, not a motorcycle or walker.

  3. #3
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    Instructions to do what, when to strobe? I suspect not as all cyclists have immaculate common sense and know exactly when strobing should be used.

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  4. #4
    tlg
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    Sure they have instructions. You could just go to their web sites and read them.

    https://www.cateye.com/en/products/d...D630-F/manual/
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  5. #5
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    I'm not a proponent of using a strobe during the day, but I just don't understand using a strobe at night.

    This ain't no disco, this ain't no party, this ain't no foolin' around.
    Too old to ride plastic

  6. #6
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    I believe they are not helping driver/cyclist relations. Personally find them annoying when Im driving and I come up to a super bright blinking head light day or night. I can imagine it really pisses off someone who is not a cyclist when they realize that bright blinky is just someone on a bike.

    You will get noticed when using it that's for sure.

  7. #7
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    The instructions read, "go to nearest internet forum and join in endless, inconclusive, ongoing loud argument." Excuse me, that should read "lively discussion."

    Just point it down a bit so it doesn't shine directly in people's eyes.
    "None of us knows for sure what's out there; that's why we keep looking. Keep your faith; travel hopefully. The universe will surprise you, constantly." The 13th Doctor.

  8. #8
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    Better to annoy them than getting that run down feeling.
    In nighttime darkness, a strobe makes little sense. At least worthless for seeing junk on the road. Maybe use in tandem with another light, but point the strobe down down down.
    Over the past fifty thousand miles, my daytime strobe has saved my neck on several occasions, judging by the last-second double takes before a vehicle or pedestrian turned in front of me.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    I'm not a proponent of using a strobe during the day.
    A year-long cycling experiment in Denmark among 4,000 cyclists, found "that those who used front and rear daytime running lights had 19% fewer crashes that caused injury than those in a control group."

    Clemson researchers found, during the day, "that from a distance of 200 meters...a flashing tail light is significantly more conspicuous than an always-on tail light, which in turn is significantly more conspicuous than" no tail light at all.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fast ferd View Post
    Better to annoy them than getting that run down feeling.
    That is what I do, but I don't ride at night. It works during the day also. With vehicle interactions they will never be able to say they never saw me.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    A year-long cycling experiment in Denmark among 4,000 cyclists, found "that those who used front and rear daytime running lights had 19% fewer crashes that caused injury than those in a control group."

    Clemson researchers found, during the day, "that from a distance of 200 meters...a flashing tail light is significantly more conspicuous than an always-on tail light, which in turn is significantly more conspicuous than" no tail light at all.
    I've been known to use a flashing tail light in dim conditions, but when night falls it's head and tail lights on. Might supplement the tail light with the flasher, but I've never used a flashing head light.

    I've never used a flashing head light and probably never will. I find some of the intensely bright blinking head lights that some use so distracting that I've had the urge to remove them from the bike and throw them to the ground. I haven't though.
    Too old to ride plastic

  12. #12
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    One of my biggest pet peeve is with those that strobe head lamp on the bike trail/path after dark. I'm fine with strobing on roads/in traffic, but it makes absolutely no sense to do so on a trail/path as it blinds oncoming cyclists, why do people do it?

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  13. #13
    bas
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    My peeve is those with their lights pointing straight ahead on the path completely blinding you and full wattage.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nova_rider View Post
    One of my biggest pet peeve is with those that strobe head lamp on the bike trail/path after dark. I'm fine with strobing on roads/in traffic, but it makes absolutely no sense to do so on a trail/path as it blinds oncoming cyclists, why do people do it?

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
    Well, in my case, it happens if I'm riding the road, but then jump onto a MUP. Sure, I'll point the front light down, but I'm too lazy to stop and reposition the rear. (Especially if I'm just going to be back on the road shortly).
    Capt Willard: "Every minute I stay in this room, I get weaker, and every minute Charlie squats in the bush, he gets stronger."

  15. #15
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    considering you have a steady light, strobing is never superior.
    An observer can locate a steady light in three-dimensional space, but cannot locate a flashing or strobing light in 3 dimensional space.

    The mind has to gestalt the info in order to locate the light - it cannot when flashing.

    When I was new here, a decade ago, I stumbled upon this question, and dug up genuine science articles.

    Also: consider trying to track a firefly.

    Also, here is a weird anecdote. I was a guest at a friend's place, in a basement room - totally dark except for the red light on the motion detector. I laid down in bed, settled in, then saw the light. My saccadic eye motion made it seem that the light kept moving. I thought some weird type of firefly was in my room - I was in Colorado (before legal MJ) and thought it was a different kind of firefly - I have had only brief Colorado visits.

    I eventually got up and turned the lights on and saw it was the "off" indicator for a security cam - this was a vacation home unoccupied for more than half the year. I was surprised at how my eye movement made it impossible to locate the stationary light in 3d space.

    Another time, I was traveling at night from TX to AL. A big traffic-warning sign, with a blinking light, was being pulled form one place to another. So, I was following it, and approaching gradually. The blinking light seemed like it was floating around in the air barely above the roadway, sometimes seeming to come at me, and sometimes seeming to move away, sometimes higher, sometimes lower. Once I closed the distance enough, I could perceive the entire trailer / vehicle, and it gestalted into a coherent whole.

    Finally, one study said that a blinking light has the unintended effect of drawing a fatigued or intoxilicated driver toward the light - kind of like how you shoot a line when cycling - you do not focus on the pot hole you are trying to avoid, but on the line right by it, lest you end up right in the pot hole. Flashing lights keep drawing the attention of the fatigued driver.

    I think it is not good to use blinkers or flashers ever; steady lights allow an observer to locate you in 3d space.

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