Stupid frame pump questions...
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    44

    Question Stupid frame pump questions...

    I'm going to be in a very small miniority in my area when I get one of these - I think I've seen maybe two riders with these in the past year. However, I've considered the pros and cons, and opted to get one for several reasons (one of which apparently is that I don't give a crap what anyone thinks if they see one of these on my bike). However, I've got three questions about frame pumps...
    1) How do these stay in place? Before you think I'm an idiot, let me explain... The inside angle between the top tube and the steerer tube is >90 degrees. So what keeps the frame pump anchored in place at this junction? It would seem that one small bump would knock the pump off the bike. Maybe this is typically where the so-called "pump peg" is located? If so, I don't have one, so would I require a strap for the pump?
    2) The blackburn pump descriptions only give one length for each size (e.g., Medium=20.87"). Is this the minimum length of the space where the pump would fit? Or is this the maximum?
    3) Can I realistically use a frame pump to get a tire up to 130 psi?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    3,115

    Not stupid--real men don't use CO2...

    Question number one partly relates to number two--the spring tension in the pump is what keeps it pressed snugly between the head tube and seat tube. You need to measure that distance and get a pump that's an inch or so longer when it's not compressed. Most pumps I've seen have a description of the frame sizes they're meant to accommodate listed on the packaging. As for lacking a pump peg, I'm not convinced you need one; I've ridden fire roads and singletrack on 'cross bikes that didn't have pegs, and the pump never budged. It wouldn't hurt to use one of those straps, but you should be able to get by without one. If you don't mind the way it looks, you can use a zip tie around the head tube as a substitute pump peg. Just turn the little block to the rear; you might need to trim the corners with a razor a bit to get it to fit in the pump's hole. As for 130psi, I've never tried going that high, but if you do, just think of how buffed-up your arms will be.

  3. #3

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    344
    Quote Originally Posted by takeme
    I'm going to be in a very small miniority in my area when I get one of these - I think I've seen maybe two riders with these in the past year. However, I've considered the pros and cons, and opted to get one for several reasons (one of which apparently is that I don't give a crap what anyone thinks if they see one of these on my bike). However, I've got three questions about frame pumps...
    1) How do these stay in place? Before you think I'm an idiot, let me explain... The inside angle between the top tube and the steerer tube is >90 degrees. So what keeps the frame pump anchored in place at this junction? It would seem that one small bump would knock the pump off the bike. Maybe this is typically where the so-called "pump peg" is located? If so, I don't have one, so would I require a strap for the pump?
    2) The blackburn pump descriptions only give one length for each size (e.g., Medium=20.87"). Is this the minimum length of the space where the pump would fit? Or is this the maximum?
    3) Can I realistically use a frame pump to get a tire up to 130 psi?

    Thanks!
    There are clamp-on pump pegs or umbrella clips available.
    http://www.excelsports.com/new.asp?p...ajor=3&minor=9
    You could mount the pump along the left seat stay like this.
    http://www.mindspring.com/~d.g1/pumpmount.htm
    You really need to combine these with a velcro strap. The frame pumps are spring loaded. You compress them a few cm's, squeeze them between the peg at the headtube and the seat tube at the other end. The Blackburn or Serfas pump has a indentation with a hole in it at the handle end. This is where the pump peg fits. But, railroad tracks and large bumps will dislodge a frame pump that's secured with just a pump peg. I alway use a velcro strap along with the pump peg. It may "disturbe the aestetic lines" of your bicycle, but no more than a pump jammed into the mangled spokes of your rear wheel.
    You won't be able to get 130 psi with a frame pump. But you can ride a lot further on 100 psi than 0 psi.

  4. #4
    Arrogant roadie.....
    Reputation: Dave_Stohler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,232

    Answers:

    Quote Originally Posted by takeme
    1) How do these stay in place? Before you think I'm an idiot, let me explain... The inside angle between the top tube and the steerer tube is >90 degrees. So what keeps the frame pump anchored in place at this junction? It would seem that one small bump would knock the pump off the bike. Maybe this is typically where the so-called "pump peg" is located? If so, I don't have one, so would I require a strap for the pump?
    On the bike I own that lack a pump peg (all except my 'Dale tourer), I mount the pump along the seatpost.

    2) The blackburn pump descriptions only give one length for each size (e.g., Medium=20.87"). Is this the minimum length of the space where the pump would fit? Or is this the maximum?
    Dunno. Ask Blackburn.

    3) Can I realistically use a frame pump to get a tire up to 130 psi?

    Thanks!
    I've often pumped my tires up to 145, once up to 150 (you can do that with tubulars).
    We are the 801
    We are the central shaft

  5. #5

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    44

    Thumbs up Reply to posts...

    Thanks for the input thus far!

    I assume that if this is mounted on the seat tube, then I'll lose my extra water bottle cage, which won't be acceptable.

    Also, my bike has the rear brake cable running underneath the top tube, so I'm wondering if mounting along the top tube would be a problem for that reason. I see now how a zip tie or the gizmo from Excel sports would work.

    I typically run with 155 psi on the road. I don't expect a frame pump to get close to that with ease, however, if I cannot get up to 130-140 range, then I might as well get a crank brothers power pump, and top off with a CO2. My other choice is the road morph, which appears to be highly recommended as well, although I'd almost rather have a frame pump along my top tube rather than having a frame pump running down the side of the seat tube. If I choose to morph, it would be nice to mount it along the seat stay like the frame pump in the picture above. Is that possible?

    By the way, what do these efficiency ratings in the Performance catalog mean? For example, for the morph, they have efficiencey 158/85.

  6. #6

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    344
    Quote Originally Posted by takeme
    Thanks for the input thus far!

    I assume that if this is mounted on the seat tube, then I'll lose my extra water bottle cage, which won't be acceptable.

    Also, my bike has the rear brake cable running underneath the top tube, so I'm wondering if mounting along the top tube would be a problem for that reason. I see now how a zip tie or the gizmo from Excel sports would work.

    I typically run with 155 psi on the road. I don't expect a frame pump to get close to that with ease, however, if I cannot get up to 130-140 range, then I might as well get a crank brothers power pump, and top off with a CO2. My other choice is the road morph, which appears to be highly recommended as well, although I'd almost rather have a frame pump along my top tube rather than having a frame pump running down the side of the seat tube. If I choose to morph, it would be nice to mount it along the seat stay like the frame pump in the picture above. Is that possible?

    By the way, what do these efficiency ratings in the Performance catalog mean? For example, for the morph, they have efficiencey 158/85.
    I'd take a guess that it means it takes 158 strokes or pumps to get the tire up to 85 psi. Looks like all that internet porn will finally pay off.

  7. #7
    Power Napper
    Reputation: theBreeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,853
    Zefal HPX. accept no substitutes!

    Absolutly the best and easiest to use frame pump around. I have no trouble getting a tire up to 100 psi with about 100-120 strokes. (Why you want to run 150 I have no idea, but whatever...)

    I have mine mounted under the top tube of a Gunnar Roadie. It doesn't fit real tight so I use a couple poor man's pump straps. It's tied on with a two rubber bands. I did that after I lost my regular straps and haven't replaced them yet. My Gunnar has the brake cable running under the top tube too, but the cable guides are offset to the left, so they haven't been a problem. But that may be why the pump doesn't mount tight.

    Whatever pump you get, test it out at home before you need it on the road. It will give you an idea how many strokes it takes to get a rideable tire pressure.

  8. #8

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by theBreeze
    Zefal HPX. accept no substitutes!
    Yup. Unless you need a Silca with a Campy head for some retro project bike, Zefal is the way to go. And they come with a peg that'll mount on the TT. At least they used to.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,749

    Frame pumps....

    I do see a few roadies packing full length frame pumps where I live. I just came back to a full length Blackburn FP-1. As others have mentioned it's spring loaded and a .032mm zip lock tie can be substituted as a pump peg (one comes with the pump). I had to secure a small piece of velcro tape underneath the zip lock or it would slide around on my head tube (steel frame, lot's of wax). The FP-1's come in different lengths, but they are phasing out the current model and going to one with a rubber handle, maybe that's why you just saw one size listed.. They are also coming out with a CF FP-1, don't know what that would do, unless there is a big reduction in weight. The FP-1 are mounted underneath the TT, in an out of the way place. I use a velcro tie to cinch mine down, otherwise it rattles a tad, don't think it would pop off, I've tried, but a small rattle drives me nuts. I've seen guys work very fast with a full length pump, not quite as fast as co2. I'm at the point where I really don't care what people think or say, but a lot of the pros pack full length pumps on training rides. Blackburn lists the psi rating for the FP-1 as 130 psi- that's about 100 strokes.

  10. #10
    Arrogant roadie.....
    Reputation: Dave_Stohler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,232
    Who in the world regularily rides at 155psig??
    We are the 801
    We are the central shaft

  11. #11

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    36
    Totally unaesthetic, but easy.

    I lack a pump peg as well. I mount my Zefal HPX slightly "diagonal" from the seat cluster junction down to the steerer tube/down tube junction. This spares me from using straps, zip ties, etc., and keeps both water bottle cages available. Just get one long enough to reach and still have tension on the spring.

    Pump goes in quick and easy, comes out quick and easy, etc. Spring tension keeps it in place.

    It's fallen out exactly twice in 6000 miles, and not on rr tracks, major bumps etc. so I may not have had it in exactly right or some kind of vibration slowly worked it loose.

  12. #12

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,750
    Quote Originally Posted by theBreeze
    Zefal HPX. accept no substitutes!

    Absolutly the best and easiest to use frame pump around. I have no trouble getting a tire up to 100 psi with about 100-120 strokes. (Why you want to run 150 I have no idea, but whatever...)

    I have mine mounted under the top tube of a Gunnar Roadie. It doesn't fit real tight so I use a couple poor man's pump straps. It's tied on with a two rubber bands. I did that after I lost my regular straps and haven't replaced them yet. My Gunnar has the brake cable running under the top tube too, but the cable guides are offset to the left, so they haven't been a problem. But that may be why the pump doesn't mount tight.

    Whatever pump you get, test it out at home before you need it on the road. It will give you an idea how many strokes it takes to get a rideable tire pressure.
    yup...the hpx has never left me down. I don't have a pump peg (colnago), but it fits fine under the top tube using a pump strap to hold the front.
    Insanity in individuals is something rare - but in groups, parties, nations and epochs, it is the rule.
    Friedrich Nietzsche

  13. #13
    Diesel Engine
    Reputation: Mike Prince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    898

    Thumbs up Another approach...

    Quote Originally Posted by Dinosaur
    I use a velcro tie to cinch mine down, otherwise it rattles a tad, don't think it would pop off, I've tried, but a small rattle drives me nuts.
    The largest size Blackburn is just long enough for my 60cm top tube and rattles when in place. Instead of a strap, I have a narrow strip of thick foam pipe insulation between the pump and the top tube. It's about 1/2" wide and an inch or so long. It silences the rattle and you can't see it unless you are looking for it. Works like a charm and is a bit cleaner looking than the strap. Plus if I lose it, I can just cut another strip out of the supply at home.

    I've hit some serious bumps and have not dumped the pump yet. FWIW, I got a pump peg on my Steelman, but I'm sure the zip tie solution would hold too.

  14. #14
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    187

    Blackburn Framepump CF

    Blackburn's carbon fiber frame pump is an ounce lighter according to my postal scale at the shop. My medium measures 20.75 inches uncompressed, and compresses down to 19.25. Looks great, feels great, doesn't rattle at all even off road. I've had one under the top tube on my Rock Lobster cross bike, and I forget it's there unless I shoulder the bike or get a flat. I also take it off and use it along the seatstay on my road bike, which is a little larger and doesn't have a pump peg. Great pump. The new design fits bikes better, feels better and looks great.

  15. #15
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    777
    Quote Originally Posted by takeme
    I'm going to be in a very small miniority in my area when I get one of these - I think I've seen maybe two riders with these in the past year.
    If you ride with folks who use mini-pumps, you'll be the most popular person on the ride whenever someone gets a flat, because they'll all want to use your pump. Whether or not you let them is a diefferent story. I'd let 'em use it once. When they have to go back to a mini-pump, they'll go out and buy a real one ASAP.

    With regard to choosing a pump, I heartily concur with those who recommend the Zefal HpX. The spring lockout is the coolest thing ever designed for a bike pump, they last forever, and are completely rebuildable.

    For best retention and best inflation, get the longest pump that can fit your frame. The more you compress the spring, the tighter it holds. If you don't have a pump peg, spend the 5 bucks for the Zefal umbrella clip. A zip-tie around the head tube works, but the Zefal clip works better. Use a strap if you're worried, but I've never lost a top-tube mounted pump on any bike with a pump peg. On my Cannondale touring bike, I use a pump clip on the top of the seatstay, and run the pump from the rear dropout to the clip. I use a strap there, just because of proximity to the rear wheel.

    If the weight of your pump is an issue for anything besides your ego, don't sweat it, just grab a spare wheel from the team car. What, you don't have a team car following you around wherever you go?? Than shut up and quit worrying about what you pump weighs, weenie!!

    Shannon, who thinks that mini-pumps suck, in
    San Diego, CA

Similar Threads

  1. alternative method for pump pegs?
    By Dinosaur in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 08-10-2004, 03:49 PM
  2. Which CO2 system do you use?
    By bikewriter in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-17-2004, 07:10 PM
  3. Help me put a year/model to this frame!
    By Auriaprottu in forum Other Builders
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-09-2004, 01:38 PM
  4. Looking for a new frame...
    By TACSTS in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-02-2004, 06:03 AM
  5. Questions about an older OCLV frame
    By ks1g in forum Trek
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-11-2004, 03:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.