tips for surviving on 90 degree plus days? - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MT Road
    I second teh drench the head and body this helps tons
    Only if you're in a relatively dry-heat. In NowHere where the dewpoint gets 25C+ the temp to 35-40C with near 100% humidity-sweat stops evaporating meaningfully and head to toe drench quickly adds to the discomfort once the water is no longer cold.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  2. #27
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    Slow down

    Taking the edge off the speed helps.

    I often ride in long-sleeve jerseys -- the kind you can get at Target, Sports Authority, etc. Not bike jerseys but light, white ... I dunno. Undershirts, I guess, made of nylon-ish material.

    I was surprised to find that long sleeve does not equal quick death.

  3. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea138
    Remember, sweating is a good thing- the faster/more you sweat, the better your body is at cooling itself off. I aim to drink a 24oz bottle of water/elete electrolyte add-in (light salt is a cheap alternative) every hour once the temps are over 90. Drinking more would be ideal, but it doesn't always happen. Electrolytes are just as important as water. You can get salt pills at Rite Aid drug stores for much less $$ than getting anything from the bike shop.
    +1 - I paid $4.00 for a bottle of 300 buffered sodium/potassium pills. I'll take one every couple of bottles of H2o on hot days
    "Better to pin a number on and finish last, than never to pin a number on at all. Racing's cool."

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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by MB1
    We have been wearing these or similar from Terry for years now.

    http://www.bikejerseys.com/solwhitlonsl.html

    #1 It keeps the sun off and doesn't require you to wear sunscreen on your arms.
    #2 Once you start sweating they are the coolest (temp wise) jerseys we have ever worn.
    #3 YMMV
    I strongly disagree with wearing the long sleeve summer jerseys. First, I want to say up front that I have not used the kind mentioned above, but I have ridden in Phoenix and Tucson, through the summers, for 20 years. Second, I am only talking about sleeveless vs. long sleeved jerseys.

    As to the long sleeve jersey issue, IMO, it is a sun exposure vs. sweat evaporation issue. I am always cooler in a sleeveless jersey. As to one's arms, I think it is better to have faster evaporation than less sun exposure. I use plenty of sunscreen and my arms have adapted to the exposure.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by R1000
    Hmm.. this sparked my interest... right now i do half gatorade/powerade/accelerade (not all three i mean either one) with water...

    So I should a little salt to this? I'm in NJ... and hope to ride today after work...
    Look at the difference in sodium & potasium in the different drinks. The Accelerade has the most potasium. Gatorade Endurance used to be available here and had enough potasium but the plain Gatorade doesn't cut it any more.
    Jim Purdy - Mansfield, TX

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tschai
    ...... First, I want to say up front that I have not used the kind mentioned above,.....
    Well, there you go then.

    I have.

    If the sun is shining I no longer ride without 'em.

    I do wear sleevless when we are riding in the afternoon into the night.
    Quote Originally Posted by the_dude
    these are better than i was expecting, and my expectations were already rather high.

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by sidi45
    Drinking large volumes of plain water can result in hyponatremia, which is very serious.
    That's kinda rare you know. I use top drink close to 2 gallons a day on a low sodium diet and had ZERO issues.
    DIRT BOY

    "Pain is a big fat creature riding on your back. The farther you pedal, the heavier he feels. The harder you push, the tighter he squeezes your chest. The steeper the climb, the deeper he digs his jagged, sharp claws into your muscles." - Scott Martin


  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRT BOY
    That's kinda rare you know. I use top drink close to 2 gallons a day on a low sodium diet and had ZERO issues.
    I had an issue with that at the Death Valley Double Century one year. Dry heat (very dry and very hot) and lots of of plain water caused all sorts of problems for lots of pretty good riders that day.
    Quote Originally Posted by the_dude
    these are better than i was expecting, and my expectations were already rather high.

  9. #34
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    Well that's kind of normal weather for us around here.

    First thing I do now come June is get out by 6am and be back before 9-10pm before it get too hot.

    Drink 20-24oz of water before you head out. Maybe like 30-45min before you go out. Take 2 or 3 bottles of water with you. If you ride more that 1 1/2 then have 1-2 bottles of a good sports drink that your stomach can tolerate.
    This way you have water to start and SD near the end. Also pouring some water on your head near the end will cool your core down.

    I use several sports drinks. Some I can handle others I can't. Like Enverit or Gatorade Endurance. Fro rides over 2hrs r wear I skip breakfast, I will use Accelerade. Gatorade Endurance works very well for me as I sweat like a pig and lose a lot of sodium in the summer. When I come home, not only is my face and helmet crusted with salt and most my body is a well.

    Then I hydrate with more water when I get home and some salted nuts.

    Most people, including me a chronically dehydrated (too much coffee for me.) and it's best to correct this first before summer hits. I am in the process of that now.

    Again water before you head out, then plenty more during your rides including a sports drink or a electrolyte drink.

    I take 2 bottles and finish them with the hr. So I stop half way during the ride to get more form a gas station or 7-11. 1 water and 1 Gatorade to take me home. So that's (2) 24oz and (2) 20oz bottles for a 2-3 hr ride.
    Last edited by DIRT BOY; 06-09-2008 at 11:46 AM.
    DIRT BOY

    "Pain is a big fat creature riding on your back. The farther you pedal, the heavier he feels. The harder you push, the tighter he squeezes your chest. The steeper the climb, the deeper he digs his jagged, sharp claws into your muscles." - Scott Martin


  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by MB1
    I had an issue with that at the Death Valley Double Century one year. Dry heat (very dry and very hot) and lots of of plain water caused all sorts of problems for lots of pretty good riders that day.
    Really? Most Drs I know and other sports specialists and coaches I know say it's rare.

    Now doing 200 miles in Death Valley is NOT normal. Thos extreme temps with too much plain water might lead to mild from of it. But DEATHS are extremely rare!

    I have only hike in temps like that in Utah and NV. 3-4 hrs and putting down 100-150 oz of plain water was fine for me. But then again I would eat some salty snacks.

    Again deaths or sickness in rare. Riding 200 miles+ in DV is rare.

    That's also crazy! But so is riding Slick Rock trail in August at 2pm!

    Next time, drink some Pickle brine. Yes, it works!
    DIRT BOY

    "Pain is a big fat creature riding on your back. The farther you pedal, the heavier he feels. The harder you push, the tighter he squeezes your chest. The steeper the climb, the deeper he digs his jagged, sharp claws into your muscles." - Scott Martin


  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MB1
    Well, there you go then.

    I have.

    If the sun is shining I no longer ride without 'em.

    I do wear sleevless when we are riding in the afternoon into the night.
    What, are these things made from magic pixie dust? Riding in Phoenix in the summer with long sleeves just might cause me to faint. If in fact these jerseys improve sweat evaporation, than I suspect they would also be better for riding into the afternoon and night.

  12. #37
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    I use Gatorade in one form or another, and drink lots of it. I rarely carry just water on the bike. I'm not pimping Gatorade, but for me it's got the mojo and plain water doesn't. If you have to go out in the heat of the day (I do because I'm commuting) take it slow. Every day doesn't have to be race day. Every pedal stroke doesn't have to be an effort. You don't really have to try to beat your best time eery time you ride. Gear down, go slower, look at the scenery, take breaks. Get off the bike, sit under a tree for 10 min, and drink. You'll get there.
    Before you criticize someone walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them you'll be a mile away & you'll have their shoes.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhamlin38
    it was HI of about 107 yesterday in NJ. Sleeveless v shortsleeve, black v white. The differences aren't going to make a damned bit of a difference. .
    I disagree on both points. I am cooler in a white sleeveless. You've got to agree that you aren't going to be cooler in a black shirt? I've got a black and white cat that loves laying in the sun. The black fur is much warmer than the white fur cause the black absorbs heat from that ball of fire in the sky & white reflects it. The slower a person rides, like mountain biking, the more light colors help IMHO. I noticed that there were no dark colored shoes worn in the Giro de italia. Think that's cause all the teams are racist against dark colored shoes?

    twinkles

  14. #39
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    Tip: donít binge drink the night before, as it will seriously impede the ability for your cells to engage in an isotonic manner.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRT BOY
    That's kinda rare you know. I use top drink close to 2 gallons a day on a low sodium diet and had ZERO issues.
    Yes, I know it's rare. Just noting that it's possible to overdo it.

  16. #41
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    Get hydrated prior to the ride, then follow almost any tip already listed here. Also the body is an amazing thing, in time you will acclimate to the heat, but it takes time.

  17. #42
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    move to Seattle, hoping to make 60 today

  18. #43
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    Wear regular shorts, not bib shorts.
    Take along a couple squares of paper towels to wipe the sweat from your face and forehead.
    When you stop, take off your helmet and squeeze the sweat from the pads. When you put the helmet back on, you'll feel the coolness.
    Don't overstress yourself. If your speedometer tells you you're going slower than usual, so be it.

    I regularly ride when it's in the high nineties. I only balk at riding when it gets into low hundreds.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  19. #44
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    We get some really hot days here in MO during the summer. I try to drink LOTS of fluids, I usually take one bottle of water and one of an energy drink. I'm really sold on the Polar water bottles, they keep drinks cold a lot longer than the regular ones. Don't push for any personal records when it's sweltering, heat stroke is a real danger in the summer. Try to get out in the early morning if you can.
    Smokey

  20. #45

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    What's your guys' takes on UnderArmour type spandex shirts? I see aero benefits, moisture wicking benefits, the only thing to detract is the lack of back pockets.

    Now, the acutal UA brand stuff is like 50$ but similar materials can be had for closer to $10. I've worn the legs to be warmer, but not sure about arms to be cooler.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by djh2
    What's your guys' takes on UnderArmour type spandex shirts? I see aero benefits, moisture wicking benefits, the only thing to detract is the lack of back pockets.

    Now, the acutal UA brand stuff is like 50$ but similar materials can be had for closer to $10. I've worn the legs to be warmer, but not sure about arms to be cooler.
    I gnabbed a $10 one from walmart the other day and it really seems to pull the sweat from the body. My shirt was still wet (not soaked( throughout the ride, but the HOT wind felt COOL. **Gasp** I might have caught on to something! IMO, just make sure the shirt is skin tight, but doesn't impede at all on chest movement (breathing) while riding.

  22. #47
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    Well the heat is on here in Dallas already...

    The things that help me the most besides starting the ride at 7am, which is only for weekend rides for me, usually I'm starting up at 5-6pm.... So frozen water bottles to start... and like several have said... dump some on your head from time to time.. this seems to really help me.

    Also eat plenty of banana's(not so much when you are actually riding)... and make sure you have enough electroytes, everyone is a bit different on what works.

    And... when it is really hot, just remember you can't go as hard and don't worry that you are not going quite as fast or producing the watts you are used to...

  23. #48
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    Awesome thread. Thanks to the thread starter for posting it and thanks to all the contributers. As a person that's been riding for just over a year, I've learned a lot from it.

  24. #49
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    Sounds a little weird, but when I'm not planning on doing any intervals or hard rides, i will wear a black short-sleeved jersey and bibs, then head out during the hottest hours of the day (2-6pm). I drink a ton of water, but the best thing for me right now is to get used to the heat.

    It takes ~2 weeks to get acclimated to high temperatures. Personally, I need to get this done before superweek in july, when temps often hit 95+ (with lots of humidity). 2 years ago it was 105 degrees during one of the races and in a near 100 rider field, only 1 of the top 20 guys was not from the west/south -- no one from the midwest/east/north was used to the heat. More than half the field dropped out.

    In short, my long and easy rides are during the worst of the sun so I can get ready for when it gets really bad. If I need to stay cool during intervals or hard rides, I follow much of the above advice.

  25. #50

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    Sounds silly but the best way to gauge your hydration level is the color of your piss. The clearer it is the more hydrated you are. The more yellow the more you need water. If it's really bright you should be chugging down water. I learned this at a wrestling camp i went to before my senior year of high school where we wrestled outside in 90 degrees and 90% humidity in the middle of summer (gotta love Minneapolis). Always worked for us.

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