• 06-08-2008
    tindrum
    tips for surviving on 90 degree plus days?
    i have no problem in the winter when the wind chill takes things down below freezing, but i am sweating like mad now that the summer has hit full force. any tips from folks who live in chronically hot areas? i feel power-sapped. i guess a sleeveless jersey would help, but i'm without one at the moment. i haven't even been bothering wearing gloves.
  • 06-08-2008
    bsdc
    Go out early in the morning, ride hard and fast with lots of ice cold water and get home before it becomes crazy hot.
  • 06-08-2008
    Marc
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bsdc
    Go out early in the morning, ride hard and fast with lots of ice cold water and get home before it becomes crazy hot.

    Yep. Either crack of dawn or right around dusk.
  • 06-08-2008
    Cross Chained
    Usually I ride in the evening, but the other day I got up and went in the morning. Temperature-wise, it was cooler, but it did not feel cooler (it felt warmer) because the sun was overhead instead of low on the horizon. So I prefer evenings. I never, ever ride in the middle of the day.
  • 06-08-2008
    DrSmile
    Freeze the almost full bottles and put them inside a white sock to avoid condensation warming.
  • 06-08-2008
    Creakyknees
    When I start weekday rides around 5 pm it's near peak heat and the sun is still high in the sky. Last thing I do before rolling down the driveway is get the garden hose and soak my hair, neck, ears, shoulders, chest, arms, legs. Shake off the excess, put the helmet on and roll. This really helps with those first few minutes when the shock of the heat can get to ya. Of course it all dries in about 5 minutes.

    In general I put at least as much water thru my helmet vents as in my mouth. Also on my face and ears seems to help. And if I'm on a solo ride and starting to droop, I'll stop and re-douse myself from a water fountain or garden hose if I can find one. C-stores and churches are good places to look, though there have been plenty of times I've asked people in their front yard if I could use their hose and they were happy to help.

    Sunscreen. White full-zip jersey. I've considered trying the long-sleeve kind, still might. Have tried various kinds of ice in the bottles but never really thought it was worth the extra effort.

    I have had good luck with 2 things - electrolyte powder (there are lots of them, read the labels carefully) and BC headache powder in my 2nd bottle. BC is just powdered aspirin with a bit of caffeine, and it really takes the edge off of the last few miles of a long hot ride.

    Oh and also, most people need 2-3 weeks of regular exposure to acclimate. And just "being out in it" is not as good as actually riding in it.
  • 06-08-2008
    dom3333
    You have to drink plenty of water before you start your ride. Here in Arizona we ride in the mornings, but very soon it will still be 90 degrees in the morning. Not only can you become dehydrated on your ride, but most people are dehydrated before they even start. The best thing you can do is to always drink plenty of water before, during and after your ride. I have read that most people are chronicly dehydrated and I believe it. I know for my self that is true, and that my energy level is definetly tied to my hydration level.
  • 06-08-2008
    leviathans_child
    i hate riding in the super heat...in summer, i embark on most rides just as the suns coming up...but it's winter in australia at the moment so it's a good riding temp... 15-22C most of the time...
  • 06-08-2008
    Dinosaur
    h2o...as mentioned above... you need to stay hydrated. Drinks lot's of water before, during and after the ride. The first couple of days of summer are always hard here (90's is typical riding weather, gets to the 100's). You have ridden all the way through the winter, probably not used to drinking a lot of water. It takes a few weeks to get used to it. Try to find a place on your route where you can refill your bottles..I pack one bottle of water and one of sports drink. If you feel thirsty, it's too late..another thing I do if it's really hot is pick shady ride routes, even if it means riding the same roads up and back and so on..shade can knock 15o off the temp...
  • 06-09-2008
    al0
    I would give you unorthodoxal advice - try to limit fluid intake. And increase intake of salt (both natrium and potassium).
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tindrum
    i have no problem in the winter when the wind chill takes things down below freezing, but i am sweating like made now that the summer has hit full force. any tips from folks who live in chronically hot areas? i feel power-sapped. i guess a sleeveless jersey would help, but i'm without one at the moment. i haven't even been bothering wearing gloves.

  • 06-09-2008
    Andrea138
    Remember, sweating is a good thing- the faster/more you sweat, the better your body is at cooling itself off. I aim to drink a 24oz bottle of water/elete electrolyte add-in (light salt is a cheap alternative) every hour once the temps are over 90. Drinking more would be ideal, but it doesn't always happen. Electrolytes are just as important as water. You can get salt pills at Rite Aid drug stores for much less $$ than getting anything from the bike shop.
  • 06-09-2008
    VaughnA
    I don't need to say any more about hydration. Those before me have said it well, drink, A LOT. One thing I've found this year is that if you are a hairy dude like myself it really helps to trim your chest & back hair, I used clippers and #1 guard and it's like being 10 degrees cooler than before I lost the fur coat. An added benefit is that my wife likes it as well.
  • 06-09-2008
    Sprocket - Matt
    Don't do what I did yesterday...

    11:30 am start time for a 50 mile ride... temps were already in the high 80s
    No breakfast, Not enough water (timed correctly) then pound down a half bottle
    so that your body stops taking in water, then when the ride is done...
    4 & a half hours later (wtf???) promptly puke any water that you have taken in
    during the last half of ride into the bike shop parking lot.

    Next weekend will be better.
  • 06-09-2008
    logansites
    Drink lots and plan to take more breaks. Dont push yourself too hard. Are you riding solo? Find a group to share the work and it always helps to have someone there to take your mind off the heat.
  • 06-09-2008
    MB1
    We do lots of hot, hazy, humid centuries.
    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=98884
    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/sho...d.php?t=100680

    This is what works for us:

    Start really early. Just before sunrise is ideal.

    Plan a shady route.

    Polar water bottles full of ice and gatorade-we carry powder with us, ice is easy to find. Drink lots and lots.

    Eat salt crusted pretzels.

    Long sleeve white summer jerseys.

    Slow and steady gets it done.

    If you start to feel sick or dizzy; stop in the shade, rehydrate and cool off before continuing.
  • 06-09-2008
    jhamlin38
    it was HI of about 107 yesterday in NJ. Sleeveless v shortsleeve, black v white. The differences aren't going to make a damned bit of a difference.
    I'd say the most important factor to survival, is prehydrating like a madman, and putting as much water on you as in you.
  • 06-09-2008
    BuenosAires
    Also, get some Polar water bottles and pack them full of ice. They'll keep your water cold much longer than a standard bottle. You'll appreciate it an hour into your ride.
  • 06-09-2008
    cmg
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by MB1
    We do lots of hot, hazy, humid centuries.
    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=98884
    http://forums.roadbikereview.com/sho...d.php?t=100680

    This is what works for us:

    Start really early. Just before sunrise is ideal.

    Plan a shady route.

    Polar water bottles full of ice and gatorade-we carry powder with us, ice is easy to find. Drink lots and lots.

    Eat salt crusted pretzels.

    Long sleeve white summer jerseys.

    Slow and steady gets it done.

    If you start to feel sick or dizzy; stop in the shade, rehydrate and cool off before continuing.


    Try eating candy bars with salt in them. Planter's peanut bars are a favorite. Try to setup rides with a convience store or stop 10-15 mile intervals. Rest for at least 15 minutes long, enough to feel cool when you start again.
  • 06-09-2008
    tindrum
    thanks alot folks.... i always try and keep a bottle of water and one of gatorade (much cheaper to just buy it in bulk powder i've noticed). one question though, why the recommendation for long-sleeve jerseys? seems kind of counter-intuitive but i assume there's a good reason... i'm primarily interested because i was about to go on performance and order a white sleeveless jersey.
  • 06-09-2008
    Uprwstsdr
    Use a Camelback that is filled with ice, or fill 3/4 full the night before and freeze, add water before you start. the cold on your back helps a lot.
  • 06-09-2008
    MB1
    Make sure it is a "Summer" long sleeve jersey.
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by tindrum
    .... why the recommendation for long-sleeve jerseys? seems kind of counter-intuitive but i assume there's a good reason... i'm primarily interested because i was about to go on performance and order a white sleeveless jersey.

    We have been wearing these or similar from Terry for years now.

    http://www.bikejerseys.com/solwhitlonsl.html

    #1 It keeps the sun off and doesn't require you to wear sunscreen on your arms.
    #2 Once you start sweating they are the coolest (temp wise) jerseys we have ever worn.
    #3 YMMV
  • 06-09-2008
    JimP
    To increase the potasium intake, add a little salt substitute to whatever you are putting in your bottles.
  • 06-09-2008
    sidi45
    As a caveat to "drink lots" be sure you are getting electrolytes, sodium, etc with it. Drinking large volumes of plain water can result in hyponatremia, which is very serious.
  • 06-09-2008
    R1000
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JimP
    To increase the potasium intake, add a little salt substitute to whatever you are putting in your bottles.


    Hmm.. this sparked my interest... right now i do half gatorade/powerade/accelerade (not all three i mean either one) with water...

    So I should a little salt to this? I'm in NJ... and hope to ride today after work...
  • 06-09-2008
    MT Road
    All are good responses I hit the heat a bunch on Sat I started my ride at 5:00 AM it was 76 rode 92 miles and pulled in to the house it was 94 at 11:30

    My best tips

    Butt Cream
    Water - I start drinking the day before then during the ride - fill up every chance you can it will add time to your ride but worth it..
    I second teh drench the head and body this helps tons
    Electrolights... I use Sports Legs

    Outside of that you will get used to it the first few long rides will hurt you but you will get it..