Total Knee Replacement - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    I had my first TKA (replacement) 19 days ago. Off Hydrocodone by the third night, Extra Strength Tylenol every 6 hours since. Swelling is difficult to manage, especially if I get carried away exercising or walking. Elevate and ice is the bottom line. Two days away from being cleared to drive, 3 weeks after surgery. Probably 1-2 weeks before I'll be ready to get back on my bike. Other knee is scheduled for mid-April.

  2. #27
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    I have seen many articles stating between 25-30% of TKR surgeries are unnecessary? Google it and have a read.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    both of my knees are thrashed, had a radical and a scope on the left, two scopes on the right.

    orthopedist said to delay TKR as long as possible. said I'd 'know' when it was time...

    some of the accounts in this thread convince me that's a good plan.
    I'm in the same boat as you. I tore the ACL in my left knee more than 30 years ago and now, at age 62, it is totally trashed. Bone on bone and horribly misshapen. My doctor looks at my X-rays and cannot believe I am not in constant agony.

    I ride year-round (road and mountain) and I think the cycling acts as a form of physical therapy. I rarely have any discomfort on the bike, but I am limited in other activities (too much walking or stair climbing can cause some swelling and pain).

    My doctor says I will know when its time for the TKR. I plan to put it off for as long as possible. This is not a procedure to restore your previous athletic ability; it is a procedure to relieve pain and suffering, and to restore mobility for people struggling in their day to day activities.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dino Sore View Post
    This is not a procedure to restore your previous athletic ability; it is a procedure to relieve pain and suffering, and to restore mobility for people struggling in their day to day activities.
    yeah, don't think that can be overstated. TKR is major surgery with significant rehab designed to reduce pain, not get you back out on the basketball court...

    I'm progressing towards the point where the knees are affecting my quality of life. was climbing a ladder to get on the roof of the house recently and wasn't sure they were going to let me get back to the ground...not good.

    would have hated for the fire dept come out to rescue me.
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  5. #30
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    I knew it was time to replace my knees when about the only thing I could do to remain somewhat in shape was ride. I'm a week away from completing PT for my first knee replacement. My riding buddies with hip, knee, and/or ankle replacements all said what an improvement in quality of life they experienced, and I saw how I became unable to keep up with them while riding. The longer you wait for replacement, the more difficult the recovery. I'm looking forward to getting my other knee replacement in seven weeks, and having two new knees.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dino Sore View Post
    I'm in the same boat as you. I tore the ACL in my left knee more than 30 years ago and now, at age 62, it is totally trashed. Bone on bone and horribly misshapen. My doctor looks at my X-rays and cannot believe I am not in constant agony.

    I ride year-round (road and mountain) and I think the cycling acts as a form of physical therapy. I rarely have any discomfort on the bike, but I am limited in other activities (too much walking or stair climbing can cause some swelling and pain).

    My doctor says I will know when its time for the TKR. I plan to put it off for as long as possible. This is not a procedure to restore your previous athletic ability; it is a procedure to relieve pain and suffering, and to restore mobility for people struggling in their day to day activities.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4slomo View Post
    My riding buddies with hip, knee, and/or ankle replacements all said what an improvement in quality of life they experienced, and I saw how I became unable to keep up with them while riding. The longer you wait for replacement, the more difficult the recovery. I'm looking forward to getting my other knee replacement in seven weeks, and having two new knees.
    I know several riders who got hip replacements (after bike falls) and recovered well. It would be helpful to hear more stories of cyclists who had great experiences with knee replacements; TKRs seem to be more hit or miss.

  7. #32
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    I had serial TKR's in 2015, the right in January and the left in August. I did some riding between the first and second and got some miles in after the second during 2015. 2016 was a rebuild year, and I rode 5k that year without much of an issue. 2017 I rode 6k with some issues in my left knee, and 2018 I rode another 6k but with much more climbing. In late 2016 I began developing some tendonitis issues in my left knee and I have significantly more scar tissue in that knee than in the right. The right knee is no problem at all, but I continue to have issues with the left, which is a popliteus tendon problem (maybe knicked during surgery the doc thinks). If I press too hard on climbs or use to big a gear on flats, that tendon becomes so sore I have to back off and rest it. One solution is to "release" the tendon with surgery, the other is just to live with it and adjust my riding to accommodate the problem. I'm still working on that.

    The TKR's significantly improved my overall quality of life: I can do things I want and need to do off the bike without pain. On the bike, I can do most of what I want to do, but in my case it is an ongoing adjustment trying to sort out how to mitigate some of the left knee issues. As my surgeon said: "No two TKR's are the same." So, in general I would be very hopeful about your recovery and cycling future. I used my bike extensively during recovery, putting it on a trainer and at first just getting on the bike and rocking the pedals back and forth until I could make a full revolution and then slowly adding resistance and time on the bike while I regained range of motion.

    I have had one significant crash since the TKR's, going over the handlebars on a downhill around a curve. I partially landed on my knee and embedded a bunch of gravel but there was no issue with the knee, although there was damage to some other body parts. My surgeon observed that what tends to happen in bike crashes after a TKR is a broken femur because there is just not much give in the joint after surgery. I do tend to ride less in groups now and I am careful of who I ride with when I do group rides.

    My experience is 95% positive and most people I know with TKR's who cycle have similar outcomes, but there are outliers. I would be hopeful that you will return to or exceed whatever level of cycling you wish to have.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dino Sore View Post
    I know several riders who got hip replacements (after bike falls) and recovered well. It would be helpful to hear more stories of cyclists who had great experiences with knee replacements; TKRs seem to be more hit or miss.
    I'd recommend that cyclists not postpone joint replacement surgery. Physical fitness is a big factor in recovery and is difficult to maintain once joints begin to fail. If your surgeon of choice is made aware of your fitness and concern during your first phone contact, you may well be moved up in waiting line.

    My wife had bilateral knee replacements and the outcome has been a life changer in a positive way.

    We both believe that the surgeon is the important element in the outcome--assuming that patient follow through is consistent. In her case, my significant research and outcome to bilateral hip replacements made the choice easy.

    We are convinced that, if a patient does not delay until physical fitness degenerates, having both worn out joints replaced at the same time is the best answer (assuming they are both shot). The benefit is that you have no "good leg" and the resulting limping dependency. In addition, recovery is easier because there exists little temptation to avoid doing the post surgery work.

    We both feel that our quality of life has been restored to our younger years. She is 70 and I am 75 and we are serious hikers, bikers and I ski about 30 days a year. Neither of us have any side affects and we could not be happier with the outcome.

  9. #34
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    I've said earlier in this thread, but it bears repeating. Make sure your Ortho understands how important sports and cycling in particular are to you. If they don't approve of an active life after the TKR, find one that does. Docs are all different. Mine is a very active person and understands that the ability to be active is important. I'm in Birmingham, AL and we have a lot of really great Ortho's here because of all the football etc nearby. Don't be afraid to "interview" your ortho. It's your future. If you have lingering doubt about the doc or your particular case--look for a second opinion. Check with the PT people they know who is really good and who is just good.

    Get in the best shape you can before you have the surgery and BO YOUR PT. Yes is is a bit painful, but not that bad. Ice is your friend use it. Don't be afraid, your life will be better after. I couldn't walk 100 yards without stopping because of the pain. Now I can hike for miles without a problem. I couldn't ride my bicycle nor cut the grass, now I can ride as far as I want. Cutting the grass though is still a problem .

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