Tubular Tire Questions
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  1. #1

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    Tubular Tire Questions

    I"ve been riding for years but have always stayed away from tubular tires b/c I've heard about some drawbacks for everyday riding. I have little to no knowledge or understanding about how they work and what the perceived drawbacks may be. Can someone help out? Specifically, are they good for everyday use? Can you change on the road if you get a flat? Any difference in feel from clinchers? Any other pertinent info. would help me out. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    First off, no, they are not good for everyday use, they are superior though for track racing...will you be doing any of that? I didn't think so!!! I rode and raced on tubulars for 15 year, then about 15 years ago I switched to clinchers and I have no regrets! BUT before the dogs of war come and chew my head off, please read these web sites and then decide.

    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.17.html read the conclusion towards the end.
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html written by Sheldon Brown
    http://www.yarchive.net/bike/tubulars.html written by Jobst Brandt

    And yes you can change a flat on a tubular on the road and do it about 2 minutes faster than a clincher. And tubulars are more susceptable to flats. BUT, you have to carry a spare tubular with you, but what do you do once that spare goes flat? Oh yes thats right, now I remember, you have to remove the tubular, cut the stitches open about 6 inches where the leak is, pull the tube out and do your patching thing, then replace tube and restitch tire closed and replace. Sounds like fun to you? How about spending about 30 minutes on the side of the road doing this? With a clincher all you have to do is remove about 8 to 12 inches of one side of the tire with the leak in the center, pull out about 6 inches of the tube, do the glue thing; I use Park glueless patches and they work just fine even as a permenant patch, and it's faster; I am currently riding on a tube with one glueless patch that is 3 years old and another that is a year old with no problems. You do of course still have to rough the tube up before applying a glueless patch. But once your done patching the tube, you stuff it back in and put the tire back on, this whole process will take about 5 minutes with a front tire including reairing with a hand pump! You can carry as many patches as you want, I carry 6 along with a tire boot patch. I also carry a spare tube and a very light weight racing tire just in case, because I ride in remote areas unsupported. So that's why I carry more crud than most on this forum would.
    Last edited by froze; 06-14-2004 at 08:42 PM.

  3. #3
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    I've been riding tubulars for the last 18 years. One of the drawbacks to them is that you really can't repair them on the road. When I was in my 20's and poor I used to repair my silk sew-ups. It was a hassle but I got pretty good at it. I usually carry my spare tubular under my saddle. If I flat during my ride I tear off the old one and put the spare on. I don't carry glue with me so I usually ride home gingerly after a flat. I like to use a Continental as a spare because they fit nice and tight on the rim.

    Lately I've been getting great mileage out of my tires. Sometimes 1500-2000+ miles. I've been totally wearing the tread out. I like Vittoria CX tubulars. They are comfortable and grip like glue in the corners, and they are easy to put on. You can also pump them up to around 170 psi. Hope you found this helpful.
    Last edited by il sogno; 06-14-2004 at 09:09 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by b6d6
    I"ve been riding for years but have always stayed away from tubular tires b/c I've heard about some drawbacks for everyday riding. I have little to no knowledge or understanding about how they work and what the perceived drawbacks may be. Can someone help out? Specifically, are they good for everyday use? Can you change on the road if you get a flat? Any difference in feel from clinchers? Any other pertinent info. would help me out. Thanks.
    This debate comes up about every two weeks or so. Try a search.

    We've hashed and rehashed the same arguments that are about to come up again here...

    For every day, I'd been riding my S22 Tufos on my GL330 wheels. I keep a tube of the Tufo goop and a spare tire with me. In the weeks I was riding them, I didn't have a problem. (knock on wood)

    It don't really much matter if you're riding a pair of tubulars or a pair of clinchers. Flats happen. It is a fact of life.

    HTH,

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  5. #5
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    Tubies are made to be a racing tire......Period.
    25 years ago, clinchers were all crap. That's why tubies were used by everyone.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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  6. #6
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    i recently tried tubies for a vintage ride i was building up. i had never used them before for probably the same reasons. but in keeping with the 'spirit' of the original build and being curious about tubies i built a set of wheels.

    my limited experience has shown me that the issues with tubies are getting flats on the road. with clinchers all you fix is the whole or replace with a small tube, with tubies you gotta replace the whole tire unless you can squirt some goop in the tube-in-the-tire, hence you're carrying more stuff; replacing a tubie with a fresh one is not a big deal i found. in someways it's easier then clinchers. but if you replace the tire on the road without proper gluing(i.e. letting it dry overnight) it's recommended you 'gingerly' head home. the glue thing can be a hassle but not a big deal and i hear the tape is good and cleaner. the ride quality some feel, some don't. cheap tubies v. nice clinchers, the tubies feel more supple and softer on the road. it's kind of hard for me to describe but i do feel a difference. it's subtle but noticable. if you get nice tubies you can send them off and get them repaired for less then buying another nice tubie.

    i ride clinchers on my primary ride. it's what i'm more familiar with. but i also take my tubie geared bike out for something a bit different.

  7. #7
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    More on how tubies ride...

    Comparing tubies to clinchers is somewhat like comparing mocassins to running shoes. Good $50. tubies are delicate and thus flat prone. In my experience, they accelerated and climbed well, and were a dream banked over in corners, but I found their uneven roundness compared to clinchers slightly increased their rolling resistance, cancelling out some of their weight advantage.

    A tubular rim, the sides of which don't have to "clinch" the tire, is not as heavy and stiff as a clincher rim, so is more compliant and comfortable, nicely complimenting the sure-footed tire that will hold its shape in corners, and not distort like a clincher will.

    Since pro racers started using clinchers in the mid 90's, I still carry a romantic fondness for tubulars, but they're so expensive and such a pain to take care of, I rebuilt my tubular wheels with nice clincher rims, run Conti Ultra 2000s on them, and haven't really missed those wonderful tubies.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by moschika
    i....................... with tubies you gotta replace the whole tire unless you can squirt some goop in the tube-in-the-tire,.................
    Huh? Unless you're riding Tufos, you repair the things with thread and a patch kit.


    BTW, Tufo's aren't uneven.
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  9. #9
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    I have not found good tubulars to be delicate or flat prone. My front Conti Comp has 6000 miles on it, flat free. The rear tire has 2000 miles, though it recently did flat. It was such a slow leak that I just pumped it up and rode a lap around Central Park before going home. I fixed the flat when I got home, and the tire has been fine ever since.

    Neither tire seems anywhere near the end of their lives.

    Weight savings are negligible. Roundness can be an issue. But if they don't flat on NYC streets, they should be fine just about everywhere.


    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico
    Comparing tubies to clinchers is somewhat like comparing mocassins to running shoes. Good $50. tubies are delicate and thus flat prone. In my experience, they accelerated and climbed well, and were a dream banked over in corners, but I found their uneven roundness compared to clinchers slightly increased their rolling resistance, cancelling out some of their weight advantage.

    A tubular rim, the sides of which don't have to "clinch" the tire, is not as heavy and stiff as a clincher rim, so is more compliant and comfortable, nicely complimenting the sure-footed tire that will hold its shape in corners, and not distort like a clincher will.

    Since pro racers started using clinchers in the mid 90's, I still carry a romantic fondness for tubulars, but they're so expensive and such a pain to take care of, I rebuilt my tubular wheels with nice clincher rims, run Conti Ultra 2000s on them, and haven't really missed those wonderful tubies.
    It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the most responsive to change.

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  10. #10
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    Stand corrected.

    Quote Originally Posted by purplepaul
    I have not found good tubulars to be delicate or flat prone. My front Conti Comp has 6000 miles on it, flat free. The rear tire has 2000 miles, though it recently did flat. It was such a slow leak that I just pumped it up and rode a lap around Central Park before going home. I fixed the flat when I got home, and the tire has been fine ever since.

    Neither tire seems anywhere near the end of their lives.

    Weight savings are negligible. Roundness can be an issue. But if they don't flat on NYC streets, they should be fine just about everywhere.
    I"m just remembering the cheap 22 dollar tubs I used. They had soft rubber tread, and thin inner tubes. They were difficult to sew up and had bulges in them. Racers back then (80's) were getting good mileage out of their Conti Sprinters and Comps. I ran Sprinters once, and probably got at least 3000 miles on them.

    Bike messengers used to like tubulars. They're light and nimble and roll over pavement cracks and steel plates with aplomb.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Stohler
    Huh? Unless you're riding Tufos, you repair the things with thread and a patch kit.


    BTW, Tufo's aren't uneven.
    i know about the tufos but when i got a flat on a relatively new tubie, my local shop had some other stuff. i don't remember what it was but this shop knows there bike stuff. problem is my valve stem didn't/doesn't come out to squirt that stuff in so i didn't get it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by b6d6
    I"ve been riding for years but have always stayed away from tubular tires b/c I've heard about some drawbacks for everyday riding. I have little to no knowledge or understanding about how they work and what the perceived drawbacks may be. Can someone help out? Specifically, are they good for everyday use? Can you change on the road if you get a flat? Any difference in feel from clinchers? Any other pertinent info. would help me out. Thanks.
    I have never understood the argument against sew ups. Sew ups are for everday use and they are not more prone to flats than clinchers, I would say clinchers flat more than tubies. They are easy to change on the road if they flat. You do not have to carry all kinds of extra crap or limp home after you change one. I wouldn't compete in a crit race but you can certainly finish a training ride. Your spare should have a few layers of dried glue already applied and the residual glue on your rim will be sufficient to hold. Give me a sub 300gm sew up over any clincher/tube combo that weighs the same anyday. The sew up will last longer and be better suited for the harsh conditions of real roads. How many miles can you get out of a Conti Supersonic with a 100grm tube as compared to a Sprinter or Podium that weighs about the same? And you can buy Sprinters all day long for under $40 US.
    Have clinchers gotten better over the years? Yes, but that doesn't mean that sew-ups are still back in the dark ages. We are not still riding Wolber Gentlemans, but new generation sew ups that have the same technology that the clinchers are using. Higher durometer rubber, multi ply carcass construction, flat protection, etc. You can't compare yesterdays sew up with todays anymore than you can compare yesterdays clinchers with todays.

  13. #13
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    I think it's fairly accepted that cheap tubulars are way worse than cheap clinchers. However, I have received Comps that were fairly out of round even though the LBS sells them for over $100 each. Since I bought them from overseas, I wasn't about to send them back. I'd say 1 out of 3 were enough out of round that I could feel it riding. I still love the way they ride.

    I don't believe that there's a significant difference in resistance to flats between clinchers and tubulars. There doesn't appear to me to be anything about the structure of either one that would be a help or a hindrance with the exception of pinch flats for clinchers.

    As for changing flats, I must be a total weakling because it took me half an hour just to take my glued tire off the rim! I now realize that I way overdid the glue due to my inexperience. When I remounted it, I put a much thinner layer on the rim, and I still have no worries about rolling a tire. Comps are so tight that I wouldn't worry riding them unglued except for the tightest, fastest turns. At 8 bars, there's no way those things are coming off the rim.

    Sprinters are a whole different story. They don't even need to be pre-stretched, IME. So, a good glue job is mandatory. Still, at pressure, they'll be thoroughly pressed to the rim.

    I absolutely love the ride of tubulars, and if I continue to have good luck with flats I won't have any qualms about riding them every day. But a few flats narrowly spaced could quickly become a royal PITA, not because of the effort required to repair them (I actually enjoy opening the tire, patching it and resewing), but because of the difficulty I had in getting the tire off the rim. Luckily, my QR worked fine as a tire iron.


    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico
    I"m just remembering the cheap 22 dollar tubs I used. They had soft rubber tread, and thin inner tubes. They were difficult to sew up and had bulges in them. Racers back then (80's) were getting good mileage out of their Conti Sprinters and Comps. I ran Sprinters once, and probably got at least 3000 miles on them.

    Bike messengers used to like tubulars. They're light and nimble and roll over pavement cracks and steel plates with aplomb.
    It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the most responsive to change.

    Charles Darwin

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    Unless you've done a real crappy glue job, a tubie won't roll off in a turn. The problem is when you clip a pedal in a turn. When you do that correctly, you can launch yourself over two feet sideways. The sideways impact on the tire and rim is what rolls the tire. With a clincher, the tube will just blow from this.
    Why pedal through a turn, you ask ?.....In a crit, sometime you have to, to keep your speed up. On the bell lap, just about everybody does.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR_GRUMPY
    Unless you've done a real crappy glue job, a tubie won't roll off in a turn. The problem is when you clip a pedal in a turn. When you do that correctly, you can launch yourself over two feet sideways. The sideways impact on the tire and rim is what rolls the tire. With a clincher, the tube will just blow from this.
    Why pedal through a turn, you ask ?.....In a crit, sometime you have to, to keep your speed up. On the bell lap, just about everybody does.
    Clip a pedal, highside, and roll a tubular or clip a pedal, highside, and blow your clinchers off the rim. What's the difference? You're still going to crash.

    The type of tires you're running isn't going to make a bit of difference in the amount of road rash you get from sliding on the pavement.

    The trick to pedaling thru the corners is to learn how to do it right. You can actually stand up and sprint thru corners if you know the right technique. That's one of those things I learned as a begining cyclist way back in the late 80s... Guess no one's teaching that particular skill any more.

    M
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    Quote Originally Posted by purplepaul
    I think it's fairly accepted that cheap tubulars are way worse than cheap clinchers. However, I have received Comps that were fairly out of round even though the LBS sells them for over $100 each. Since I bought them from overseas, I wasn't about to send them back. I'd say 1 out of 3 were enough out of round that I could feel it riding. I still love the way they ride.

    I don't believe that there's a significant difference in resistance to flats between clinchers and tubulars. There doesn't appear to me to be anything about the structure of either one that would be a help or a hindrance with the exception of pinch flats for clinchers.

    As for changing flats, I must be a total weakling because it took me half an hour just to take my glued tire off the rim! I now realize that I way overdid the glue due to my inexperience. When I remounted it, I put a much thinner layer on the rim, and I still have no worries about rolling a tire. Comps are so tight that I wouldn't worry riding them unglued except for the tightest, fastest turns. At 8 bars, there's no way those things are coming off the rim.

    Sprinters are a whole different story. They don't even need to be pre-stretched, IME. So, a good glue job is mandatory. Still, at pressure, they'll be thoroughly pressed to the rim.

    I absolutely love the ride of tubulars, and if I continue to have good luck with flats I won't have any qualms about riding them every day. But a few flats narrowly spaced could quickly become a royal PITA, not because of the effort required to repair them (I actually enjoy opening the tire, patching it and resewing), but because of the difficulty I had in getting the tire off the rim. Luckily, my QR worked fine as a tire iron.
    The first flat I had was a rude awakening to the consequences of gluing that tire really good on the rim. I came to theorize the ideal might be an extremely tacky contact surface as opposed to a tight glue bond. The tire pressure does the rest.

    Once knew a triathlete who had 6 or 7 tubular tires he would go through during the season. He'd save up all his flat tires and repair them on snow days during the winter. He and his friends joked about it being a winter ritual.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by b6d6
    I"ve been riding for years but have always stayed away from tubular tires b/c I've heard about some drawbacks for everyday riding. I have little to no knowledge or understanding about how they work and what the perceived drawbacks may be. Can someone help out? Specifically, are they good for everyday use? Can you change on the road if you get a flat? Any difference in feel from clinchers? Any other pertinent info. would help me out. Thanks.
    First off, all the valid points have already been discussed. We can't really advise you either way. As someone that's ridden on clinchers for 10+ years and tubulars for 2.5+ I'd have to say you'll only find out for yourself what you prefer if you decide to get tubulars. I prefer the ride of tubulars - potentially, nothing is lighter. Sure they can be a pain, but imagine being able to use a 140 gram tyre inclusive of inner tube (my TUFO elite 650c) with a correspondingly lighter rim (Zipp 303 ~245gram). As I said, nothing is lighter, but they're not everyday wheels. I like the fact that the lightest overall wheels a still tubulars. I got them because I was curious, despite what my LBS said about them.
    Also tubulars normally are higher pressure than clinchers. The rest of you clincherphiliacs: name me one clincher that can reach 200psi.

    I think it all boils down to: if you're on a budget, tubulars are more expensive to replace. Getting a flat in the middle of nowhere also sucks, but you'll never ever get a blown inner tube pumping the things up at home. OK for the rest of you: no it doesn't happen to me anymore with clinchers --- but you don't even get that nervous feeling pumping up a tubular.

    As someone else said, if you plan on doing extended rides solo/unsupported, clinchers are the way to go, as it would be defeating the purpose carrying more than one spare tubular with you. I can't imagine anyone fixing (rather, patching) a tubular by the side of the road. The few times I have had flats on tubulars, I have not carried spares; if I'm near to home I just ring up for a lift, and if not, I hope I'm near enough to a train station. Ride over.

    I've only ever fixed one tubular, a right pain that was, so I'll probably stick with TUFOs from now on. Note that that tufo goop you're hearing about doesn't work beyond about 80psi, which isn't high enough for such a narrow tire.
    So when you get a puncture, it costs ya big time. $$$

    Perhaps you should only get tubulars if you can afford a second set of wheels. Bottom line is: Fixing normal clinchers is a snap out on the road or when you get back home.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by moschika
    i know about the tufos but when i got a flat on a relatively new tubie, my local shop had some other stuff. i don't remember what it was but this shop knows there bike stuff. problem is my valve stem didn't/doesn't come out to squirt that stuff in so i didn't get it.

    Observation #1: Tufo sealant is the only one that works. Nothing else works with high pressure tires

    Observation #2: You need to remove the valve core. If the tire you have doesn't have removeable cores, you can't use sealant. Any bike shop knows this, and should know which tires have removeable cores. They also have the core removal tools.

    Observation #3: Sounds like your shop doesn't know sh!t from shinola...
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synchronicity
    [IMG] but imagine being able to use a 140 gram tyre inclusive of inner tube (my TUFO elite 650c) with a correspondingly lighter rim (Zipp 303 ~245gram). As I said, nothing is lighter, but they're not everyday wheels. Also tubulars normally are higher pressure than clinchers.

    I think it all boils down to: if you're on a budget, tubulars are more expensive to replace. Getting a flat in the middle of nowhere also sucks, but you'll never ever get a blown inner tube pumping the things up at home

    As someone else said, if you plan on doing extended rides solo/unsupported, clinchers are the way to go, as it would be defeating the purpose carrying more than one spare tubular with you. I can't imagine anyone fixing (rather, patching) a tubular by the side of the road. The few times I have had flats on tubulars, I have not carried spares; if I'm near to home I just ring up for a lift, and if not, I hope I'm near enough to a train station. Ride over.

    I've only ever fixed one tubular, a right pain that was, so I'll probably stick with TUFOs from now on. Note that that tufo goop you're hearing about doesn't work beyond about 80psi, which isn't high enough for such a narrow tire.
    So when you get a puncture, it costs ya big time. $$$

    Perhaps you should only get tubulars if you can afford a second set of wheels. Bottom line is: Fixing normal clinchers is a snap out on the road or when you get back home.
    Well as always there is something to agree with and disagree. I don't fault you riding on tubs if that is what you want. True as you said tubulars are lighter, but lighter does not mean better, the higher you go up the scale to increase performance and lower weight the lower the life expectancy (this even applies to motor sports). And if you want light weight clinchers today American Classic makes a 350gram wheel, and you can get 145 gram tires and you can also get 50gram tubes...but the racing tub setups are still a tad lighter.

    Also true tubs are a pain to fix on the road (I know, I've done it many times) assuming you don't have a spare available. But tubs overall get more flats than clinchers so the pain you experience is greater. But with clinchers or tubs, I have never blown a tube while filling it, so not sure where that came from.

    And I hate being dependent on anyone, so if I get a flat I want to be able to deal with it right then and there; the same is true with mechanical issues. My wife is my wife, she is not my mommy; and over the last 25 years we have been married I only had to call her three times...twice for accidents from the hospital and once when I got so sick with the heavie jeevies I could not physically make it home-though I did try.

    Also the higher air pressure of 200 or close is not an advantage on the road...it is on a track! On the road the higher pressures will make the tire skittish on semi rough surfaces. I had my tubs pumped to about 140psi but you had to go that high because the sidewalls are not as strong as clinchers and very narrow thus anything much lower and you would be riding on the sidewalls (this was in the day of the silk tubs, but the cotton today is not as strong as the silk!).

    And also true tubs are more expensive to use.

    But read those web sites I mentioned in my earlier post.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Stohler
    Observation #1: Tufo sealant is the only one that works. Nothing else works with high pressure tires

    Observation #2: You need to remove the valve core. If the tire you have doesn't have removeable cores, you can't use sealant. Any bike shop knows this, and should know which tires have removeable cores. They also have the core removal tools.

    Observation #3: Sounds like your shop doesn't know sh!t from shinola...
    observation #1: you may be right. but i thought they showed me something else but it could've been the tufo stuff.

    observation #2: that's what i said too but the valve core on the tubies i have doesn't come out. that's why they didn't sell me the stuff because there would've been no way to put it in.

    observation #3: i'ld have to disagree as i'm sure all the world class pros in cycling and triathelons that use the shop think they know a thing or two about bikes. or they wouldn't use the shop for services when in town.

  21. #21
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    I don't know how you ride but I have had many more flats with clinchers than tubulars. I weigh about 190 lbs and have to have the rear tire of a clincher at 135 psi to avoid a lot of pinch flats. I am able to ride a Conti Sprinter at 95psi front and 105 psi rear without any problems. I ride on a lot of grainy pavement and the difference in the ride is considerable. As to the cost, I usually buy 3 tires at a time and the last order cost me $105 including shipping for the Sprinters.

    Jim
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimP
    I don't know how you ride but I have had many more flats with clinchers than tubulars. I weigh about 190 lbs and have to have the rear tire of a clincher at 135 psi to avoid a lot of pinch flats. I am able to ride a Conti Sprinter at 95psi front and 105 psi rear without any problems. I ride on a lot of grainy pavement and the difference in the ride is considerable. As to the cost, I usually buy 3 tires at a time and the last order cost me $105 including shipping for the Sprinters.

    Jim
    You are exact reverse of anyone I have ever known!! First off I weigh 165 but your weight difference is not an issue. With tubs it's impossible to get a pinch flat, but then again I have never got a pinch flat on a clincher...but I have know folk who did. Your also running your pressure different then I have personally or others I have known in that you ran higher pressure in your clinchers than you do in the tubs! All tubs I ever owned I ran a mininum of 160psi with as much as 180 during races, and clinchers I run a mininum of 90 to a max of 110. So this PSI thing got me curious (George), I got out a bike catalog and looked at their recommended PSI for both; the lowest tub was 130 for a cheap tub, and the highest was 180 for the expensive ones; the clincher's lowest was 90 for a cheap tire and 150 for the expensive ones. Your Conti Sprinter is recommended at 170psi, why are you running your pressure with so much lower PSI? And at 190 pounds you should be running them at about 160 give or take 5psi; at your 105 and 95 you would be riding partially on the sidewalls because tubs have very thin sidewalls made of cotton or silk (do they still use silk?), that's why they feel a bit better riding on them due to the give or flex in the sidewall.

    Makes me think you don't ride tubs at all!!

  23. #23
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    You are confusing maximum with recommended tire pressure. Look carefully at the attached picture of my bike and you will see that I am riding on an Aegis with Nimble Crosswind tubular wheels with Conti Sprinters.

    Jim
    Last edited by JimP; 03-17-2010 at 12:27 PM.
    Jim Purdy - Mansfield, TX

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    The only time that I've had a problem with that was in a crit with a downhill, off-camber, left turn. There was a hill right after the turn., so you had to really jump on it. On the bell lap, I went for it, and ended up eating it.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimP
    You are confusing maximum with recommended tire pressure. Look carefully at the attached picture of my bike and you will see that I am riding on an Aegis with Nimble Crosswind tubular wheels with Conti Sprinters.Jim
    If you read my post I said you could ride with less air; however you have way less air then I have ever seen ran in a tubular. Even Rivendell, who are real big on riding with lower air pressure because they like comfort, suggest only about 20psi lower than the rated max and thats for a 180 pound person.

    Then after searching the web to see if by some slim chance I was wrong, I found this: [email protected]: That it is inadequate inflation that often allows tubulars to roll. They used to be capable of taking higher pressures, had lower weight and mounted onto stronger, lighter rims than clinchers. Clinchers have now largely caught up, but many cyclists thinking hasn't. The reasons people give for deflating tubulars are generally false and are given for lack of understanding. This is what makes it sound like an old wive's tale. Most people do it just to be doing what they think is "professional" when in fact the protected sidewalls and pressure of most road tubulars makes deflation as meaningless for them as it is for clinchers.

    The above was quoted from one of the foremost knowledgeable experts on cycling in America.

    So I'm not going to apologize to you about this matter because I still think your in error. If anything I am more concerned for your safety if you are truly riding on tubs and that bike is yours and not a picture clipped from a web site...which is what it looks like.

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