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  1. #1
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    The ultimate saddle bag

    Several close friends and I have been working on a bicycle saddle bag prototype and would like to get some inputs and feedback from fellow cyclists here. We want to make sure we are on the right path to help address the issues that current saddle bags have.

    As avid cyclists ourselves, we often time have our dilemmas when it comes to saddle bag. Practical or aesthetic? Size or storage? At one hand we want the saddle bag practicality of carrying around the essentials items like spare tubes and multitools during our rides. On the other hand we want to keep the clean aesthetic of our bike. In the case where the practical sense won the first dilemma, we typically still need to trade off between storage space or utterly bulky saddle bag. Even the ones least concern with aesthetic would shake their heads staring at the brick like saddle bag hanging below the bicycle saddle. Majority of the saddle bags in the market today are boxy and black, which doesnít help to promote the saddle bagís stylish or aesthetic aspect.

    What do you guys look for when choosing a saddle bag? What is in your wish list of the ultimate saddle bag? If you are not a saddle bag user today, what is holding you back and what will make you switch camp?

    Would you be interested if there is a saddle bag that can do the following?
    1. Compact enough to carry most of your essential items. Think 2 spare tubes, 2 tire levers, 2 CO2 canisters, Multitools with chain tool, patch kit, all these in a compact form factor.
    2. Stylish enough to not ruin your bike aesthetic, this can be quite subjective and personal but assume it meets your styling requirement.
    3. Quick attach and release. Much faster than dealing with Velcro.
    4. Abundant styling/color choices.

    We love to hear your inputs and hopefully we will be able to create something that all the cyclists want to use. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    ditched the saddle bag long ago...

    use two ziploks in jersey pockets...one has two tubes in it, the other holds tools, money, ID, etc.

    no clunky under-saddle bag, clear plastic makes it easy to locate items, and they're dirt cheap.

    probably not what you were wanting to hear, but it's what works for me.
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  3. #3
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    Been a saddle bag user since forever, currently use a lenyze med/small, not sure that is really good, it's maybe a little small, but then it fit well uner the saddle withut geting in the way. Takes a decent multi tool (i use topeak hexas II) in a separate pocked underneath, then 2 tubes (road) and I think 2 levers (not sure a bout those, been a while since I used anything in there and multi tool had levers)...
    Things I think a bag needs,
    -needs to be secure, not fall off, but also not sway around a lot.
    -gotta take 2 tubes
    -the shape, most seem to taper so they fit...something, but then you cant fit stuff actually inside them
    -reflective
    -something to attach a light to, lots have a loop, but if you attach a light to it, its just all floppy
    -weather proof, not have to be totally waterproof, just a bit
    -never used them, but I'm thinking compartments for C02 would be handy
    -I don't really need a QR as the bag stay on the bike except for washing


    -also, make a decent mtb one that work with a dropper post.
    All the gear and no idea

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    ditched the saddle bag long ago...

    use two ziploks in jersey pockets...one has two tubes in it, the other holds tools, money, ID, etc.

    no clunky under-saddle bag, clear plastic makes it easy to locate items, and they're dirt cheap.

    probably not what you were wanting to hear, but it's what works for me.
    Most prefer to have the bike support the weight of incidentals. I sure wouldn't want that weight in my jersey pocket unless an emergency + cell phone + keys.

    OP, you have a pretty good list of metrics you prefer. Start with Topeak but you may end up with something very different.
    Aesthetics, function, size = personal preference.

  5. #5
    tka
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    I use a Banjo Bros Deluxe Seat Bag and it carries all the stuff you listed. It is easy to attach and remove from the bike, the only thing that would make it perfect is if the zipper were totally waterproof. No need to find anything else when near perfect already exists.

  6. #6
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    The ultimate saddle bag

    Quote Originally Posted by survivor82 View Post
    Several close friends and I have been working on a bicycle saddle bag prototype and would like to get some inputs and feedback from fellow cyclists here. We want to make sure we are on the right path to help address the issues that current saddle bags have.

    As avid cyclists ourselves, we often time have our dilemmas when it comes to saddle bag. Practical or aesthetic? Size or storage? At one hand we want the saddle bag practicality of carrying around the essentials items like spare tubes and multitools during our rides. On the other hand we want to keep the clean aesthetic of our bike. In the case where the practical sense won the first dilemma, we typically still need to trade off between storage space or utterly bulky saddle bag. Even the ones least concern with aesthetic would shake their heads staring at the brick like saddle bag hanging below the bicycle saddle. Majority of the saddle bags in the market today are boxy and black, which doesnít help to promote the saddle bagís stylish or aesthetic aspect.

    What do you guys look for when choosing a saddle bag? What is in your wish list of the ultimate saddle bag? If you are not a saddle bag user today, what is holding you back and what will make you switch camp?

    Would you be interested if there is a saddle bag that can do the following?
    1. Compact enough to carry most of your essential items. Think 2 spare tubes, 2 tire levers, 2 CO2 canisters, Multitools with chain tool, patch kit, all these in a compact form factor.
    2. Stylish enough to not ruin your bike aesthetic, this can be quite subjective and personal but assume it meets your styling requirement.
    3. Quick attach and release. Much faster than dealing with Velcro.
    4. Abundant styling/color choices.

    We love to hear your inputs and hopefully we will be able to create something that all the cyclists want to use. Thanks!
    1: seems like weíre about to get Kickstarter pitched, but without any glossy pics.

    2:Eh, not gonna lie, I wonít order yours on the interwebs over any of the major brands in this department.
    Because: 2b etc
    Weíre basically talking about a durable dingleberry... job 1- carry what I think I need, job 2, stay attached to the bike, job 3, when some semi-pro poser tells me Iím wrong for having it, donít fail on 1 and 2. Waterproof is overrated.... good tools wonít rust after a rainy ride or three and tubes will break down either way.

    I have 1 saddle bag per bike, and only 1 isnít from a ďMajorĒ manufacturer. It happened to be in the right shop at the right time [and fit the aesthetic of that frame well]. I donít give a flying **** about quick detach.. 1 bag per bike, no reason to detach on recreational rides... three velcro straps probably work better than what youíll come up with at that price point.

    Commute/transport rides means Iím carrying a larger bag of some sort and can put the dingleberry in the pannier or backpack.

    Good luck breaking into that niche market, but I just donít see the room on the practical side... go with aesthetics to match a color scheme and you might have a shot.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by kjdhawkhill; 12-14-2017 at 05:46 PM.
    The internet is a little like a bar, a wonderful place where we can bullsh(t our past, but it also, is full of reasonably reliable sources of information to be used as ammo to call "bullish)t."

  7. #7
    JSR
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    Itís got to have a clip on a leash for keys.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjdhawkhill View Post
    1: seems like weíre about to get Kickstarter pitched, but without any glossy pics.

    2:Eh, not gonna lie, I wonít order yours on the interwebs over any of the major brands in this department.
    Because: 2b etc
    Weíre basically talking about a durable dingleberry... job 1- carry what I think I need, job 2, stay attached to the bike, job 3, when some semi-pro poser tells me Iím wrong for having it, donít fail on 1 and 2. Waterproof is overrated.... good tools wonít rust after a rainy ride or three and tubes will break down either way.

    I have 1 saddle bag per bike, and only 1 isnít from a ďMajorĒ manufacturer. It happened to be in the right shop at the right time [and fit the aesthetic of that frame well]. I donít give a flying **** about quick detach.. 1 bag per bike, no reason to detach on recreational rides... three velcro straps probably work better than what youíll come up with at that price point.

    Commute/transport rides means Iím carrying a larger bag of some sort and can put the dingleberry in the pannier or backpack.

    Good luck breaking into that niche market, but I just donít see the room on the practical side... go with aesthetics to match a color scheme and you might have a shot.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thank you for your feedback. Major brand used to be tiny brand when they get started. Hopefully we will have something to win you over eventually. With that said, there is no one size fits all. Everyone will have their preferences. Our goal has always been creating a product that we will use it ourselves.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mik_git View Post
    Been a saddle bag user since forever, currently use a lenyze med/small, not sure that is really good, it's maybe a little small, but then it fit well uner the saddle withut geting in the way. Takes a decent multi tool (i use topeak hexas II) in a separate pocked underneath, then 2 tubes (road) and I think 2 levers (not sure a bout those, been a while since I used anything in there and multi tool had levers)...
    Things I think a bag needs,
    -needs to be secure, not fall off, but also not sway around a lot.
    -gotta take 2 tubes
    -the shape, most seem to taper so they fit...something, but then you cant fit stuff actually inside them
    -reflective
    -something to attach a light to, lots have a loop, but if you attach a light to it, its just all floppy
    -weather proof, not have to be totally waterproof, just a bit
    -never used them, but I'm thinking compartments for C02 would be handy
    -I don't really need a QR as the bag stay on the bike except for washing


    -also, make a decent mtb one that work with a dropper post.
    When we are designing our product we did make sure secure attachment is a must. Reflective is a good suggestion and we will see how we can incorporate that into our design. We did think about the light attachment and currently working on a solution that would be able to secure the light without it being floppy. Thank you very much for your inputs.

  10. #10
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    1. Compact enough to carry most of your essential items.
    - 2 tubes; 1 tire lever; 1 pva; 1 chain quick link; 1 tire boot; 2 CO2; 1 small thread on CO2 inflation thing; small allen set w/chain tool or separate chain tool; patch kit without patch kit box.

    2. Stylish enough to not ruin your bike aesthetic
    - Small; smaller in width than saddle; narrow enough that my legs never hit it; and absolutely no swinging ball sack

    3. Quick attach and release. Much faster than dealing with Velcro.
    - No. IME slower to detach means stays on for years; quick and easy detach means self detaching.

    4. Abundant styling/color choices.
    - Yes, any color as long as it is black.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by crit_boy View Post
    1. Compact enough to carry most of your essential items.
    - 2 tubes; 1 tire lever; 1 pva; 1 chain quick link; 1 tire boot; 2 CO2; 1 small thread on CO2 inflation thing; small allen set w/chain tool or separate chain tool; patch kit without patch kit box.

    2. Stylish enough to not ruin your bike aesthetic
    - Small; smaller in width than saddle; narrow enough that my legs never hit it; and absolutely no swinging ball sack

    3. Quick attach and release. Much faster than dealing with Velcro.
    - No. IME slower to detach means stays on for years; quick and easy detach means self detaching.

    4. Abundant styling/color choices.
    - Yes, any color as long as it is black.
    For #3, quick and easy detach doesn't necessary means self detaching. We have been testing our attachment system and it is pretty solid. We will share more details once the design has been finalized but the initial prototyping test is very promising.

    Looks like black is still the preferred color of many. Maybe black it is then.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by survivor82 View Post
    When we are designing our product we did make sure secure attachment is a must. Reflective is a good suggestion and we will see how we can incorporate that into our design. We did think about the light attachment and currently working on a solution that would be able to secure the light without it being floppy. Thank you very much for your inputs.
    Also something else, could you, somehow, make it so once you fill the thing up, for it to weigh nothing. I swear my saddle bag weighs more than my bike! (especially on the mtb) so antimatter or something would be the go...
    All the gear and no idea

  13. #13
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    1. I like color on my bikes but the saddle bag needs to be black. Its not really a feature I'd want to draw attention to. Just there to be practical.
    2. Hold all of the essentials so you aren't stranded 50 miles from home.
    3. I like the quick detach idea. Will be convenient for putting my bike in the work stand.
    4. A real selling point for me would be having a specific and secure place for each piece. Individual pouches or elastic straps for CO2, multi tool, tire levers, one shift cable, etc. to have their own place without them just floating around loose and falling out when I open my saddle bag. Tubes can just take the vacant space in the middle. With that being said a tight fit is good. As long as everything fits even if it means needing specific tubes and tools to fit within the compact space.
    5. A clip for keys is pretty critical. I probably wouldn't buy a saddle bag without one.

    As long as it holds everything I need when **** goes wrong I'll be happy but I'm all for improvements to keep it more organized!

  14. #14
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    I'd like something that is not designed by committee, and that is not described with corporate marketing speak.

    But, since a good product will serve cyclists, consider this. A quick release is a good idea, though there are others out there that do that. However, people seem to think about that in terms of other things being done with the bike like putting it in a work stand, not actually using the bag when riding the bike. So think about a tri fold wallet. Imagine a bag that when you have to access it, you snap off the bike and flip open. Everything in the bag is secured, and easy to see. You can lay it on the ground for working, or just hold it in your hand. When done with a tube change, or getting money, or whatever, flip it closed and clip on and go.

    This would give your design an advantage over most bags in terms of ACCESS to everything stored. That single word tells the world what they get with your bag compared to the eleventy other brands out there.

    This is not a new idea, most nothing is a new idea in cycling. But done right, marketed right, it could be the small type of product differentiation that makes it worth buying for enough riders to be commercially viable.

    At which point the big companies will swoop in and undercut you, so you better be ready for that.

    Good luck, you'll need it.
    .
    Stout beers under trees, please.

  15. #15
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    1) The road basics (two C02s, one inflator, one small patch kit, one tire tool, one set of fix-it sticks, one tube, one slim inside pocket for cash, copy of DL, insurance card, handi-wipe.
    2) Exterior pocket for keys, suggest on top of the bag. (can you believe how big they are?
    3) Velcro works great, no clips please
    4) Waterproof soft expandable material.
    5) Black
    6) Narrow nose and tapered like a normal seat, slimmer than seat.
    7) Attachment strap/loop for light

    I leave the stuff in the bag and only open the bag to store my keys, a PITA. A small exterior pocket is a great idea.
    Last edited by n2deep; 12-15-2017 at 05:47 AM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuiQuaeQuod View Post
    I'd like something that is not designed by committee, and that is not described with corporate marketing speak.

    But, since a good product will serve cyclists, consider this. A quick release is a good idea, though there are others out there that do that. However, people seem to think about that in terms of other things being done with the bike like putting it in a work stand, not actually using the bag when riding the bike. So think about a tri fold wallet. Imagine a bag that when you have to access it, you snap off the bike and flip open. Everything in the bag is secured, and easy to see. You can lay it on the ground for working, or just hold it in your hand. When done with a tube change, or getting money, or whatever, flip it closed and clip on and go.

    This would give your design an advantage over most bags in terms of ACCESS to everything stored. That single word tells the world what they get with your bag compared to the eleventy other brands out there.

    This is not a new idea, most nothing is a new idea in cycling. But done right, marketed right, it could be the small type of product differentiation that makes it worth buying for enough riders to be commercially viable.

    At which point the big companies will swoop in and undercut you, so you better be ready for that.

    Good luck, you'll need it.
    Thanks for the great advice. Easy access is one of our design criterias and from our early prototype it has never been easier to access the tools. I think what we have will achieve most of what you describe here.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by n2deep View Post
    1) The road basics (two C02s, one inflator, one small patch kit, one tire tool, one set of fix-it sticks, one tube, one slim inside pocket for cash, copy of DL, insurance card, handi-wipe.
    2) Exterior pocket for keys, suggest on top of the bag. (can you believe how big they are?
    3) Velcro works great, no clips please
    4) Waterproof soft expandable material.
    5) Black
    6) Narrow nose and tapered like a normal seat, slimmer than seat.
    7) Attachment strap/loop for light

    I leave the stuff in the bag and only open the bag to store my keys, a PITA. A small exterior pocket is a great idea.
    For #3, maybe I am biased but our clip design works great too. Maybe once we finalized the design we can win you over from the Velcro camp

    I have seen request for keys holder several times and we will take it into consideration when we finalized our design. Thanks for the great inputs.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by survivor82 View Post
    Thanks for the great advice. Easy access is one of our design criterias and from our early prototype it has never been easier to access the tools. I think what we have will achieve most of what you describe here.
    I suppose it doesn't hurt. But if a few seconds getting a tool makes any difference to me I need to worry about how taking better care of my bike before I worry about saddle bags.

    Fits what I want to carry, doesn't flop around or touch my legs when pedaling. That's all I care about. My intent isn't to 'use' it. I just want what I might need on the bike to eliminate the possibility of forgetting it.

  19. #19
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    Your challenge is...your list of metrics will end up limiting your market and demand. So I posit, you are starting with a false premise. There is no ultimate bag because bag requirements vary specific to each rider.

    For example, I don't want a bag as you describe for my road bike. Maybe for a touring bike. I may flat every couple of months or so and only time I need access. Keys and phone go in my jersey. I want minimalism, smallest size, lowest weight and Velcro attachment which allows the bag to be more integrated under saddle. In summary, I want the most innocuous bag to hold 2 inflators, a tube, a couple of levers, a couple of wrenches. If I need anything else, I get if from my riding buddies, or from a stranger on the road....or I call somebody with a castostrophic failure.

    So, one size doesn't fit all and basically you are starting in the middle, something closer to what I may use for touring if not carrying my panniers.

    You likely know you are penetrating a highly competitive market with big players that make pretty amazing product and moreover BIG diversity because they know instinctively one size doesn't fit all. Even the Lezyne Micro Caddy Small Saddle Bag comes with either a quick release or....Velcro attachment...I opt for the more minimalistic Velcrow as the bag is hardly noticeable on the bike and lightest weight possible which my objective....highest ratio of transparency to function. My bag will also fit snuggly in a bottle cage.

    As a Shark Tank investor ;-) you better bring game if you wanna compete in these waters and best of luck to you wading into this very deep pond.
    Last edited by 11spd; 12-15-2017 at 07:17 AM.

  20. #20
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    Saddle bags are for 'tards. Jersey pockets is all you need less you're touring.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11spd View Post
    Your challenge is...your list of metrics will end up limiting your market and demand. So I posit, you are starting with a false premise. There is no ultimate bag because bag requirements vary specific to each rider.

    For example, I don't want a bag as you describe for my road bike. Maybe for a touring bike. I may flat every couple of months or so and only time I need access. Keys and phone go in my jersey. I want minimalism, smallest size, lowest weight and Velcro attachment which allows the bag to be more integrated under saddle. In summary, I want the most innocuous bag to hold 2 inflators, a tube, a couple of levers, a couple of wrenches. If I need anything else, I get if from my riding buddies, or from a stranger on the road....or I call somebody with a castostrophic failure.

    So, one size doesn't fit all and basically you are starting in the middle, something closer to what I may use for touring if not carrying my panniers.

    You likely know you are penetrating a highly competitive market with big players that make pretty amazing product and moreover BIG diversity because they know instinctively one size doesn't fit all. Even the Lezyne Micro Caddy Small Saddle Bag comes with either a quick release or....Velcro attachment...I opt for the more minimalistic Velcrow as the bag is hardly noticeable on the bike and lightest weight possible which my objective....highest ratio of transparency to function. My bag will also fit snuggly in a bottle cage.

    As a Shark Tank investor ;-) you better bring game if you wanna compete in these waters and best of luck to you wading into this very deep pond.
    I totally agree that there is no one size fits all situation with saddle bag. Perhaps a saddle bag that is compact enough with sufficient storage space for majority cyclist population and adaptable enough for most needs could hopefully be the "ultimate" saddle bag, albeit it may still not fulfill the needs of some.

    From my testing experience with our earlier prototypes, I have to say our product meets most if not all of your requirements above. But perhaps it is best for you to be the judge when we finally have it ready. I will keep you posted.

    Thanks for the great inputs.

  22. #22
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    I pack what I need in my jersey pockets. What I pack in my saddle bag is stuff I reach for if I have a second flat. I like the Lezyne Micro Caddy Seat Bag. It's just the right size to squeeze in a spare tube, slots for a co2 cartridge and tire irons, a glueless tire patch kit, a couple of spare connecters for chains, a Park tire boot and a spoke wrench. It has one wide velcro strap and cinches tight to your seat post. I'm not too fond of velcro straps as I have lost a few of them on rides when the velcro gets old and looses it's grip. I like a snap on type on strap or a combination of velcro and a clip on. I replace my M caddy about every year so I don't have to worry about the velcro wearing out. There must be a sea of seat bags out there, what anyone needs probably already exists...

  23. #23
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    My biggest complaint about saddle bags I've owned in the past is that the attachment mechanism fails. Either it was a strap that was poorly stitched to the bag (both the strap that attaches to the seat rails, and the strap that wraps around the seatpost), or the plastic clip that attaches to the seat rails broke. Also zippers that broke or froze up. So whatever you come up with, make it robust. Ease of removal / attachment is nice for those of us with multiple bikes - just be sure it doesn't require any tools. Also, design the bag so that it attaches securely, i.e. it doesn't sway back and forth under the seat.
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  24. #24
    dcb
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    Not sure who needs tire leverS? Usually you don't need any but on rare occasions 1 will do. I like clips but the problem I've encountered with them at times is that they don't fit every saddle rail. For that reason velcro may be a safer bet. Plus it's easier to move from bike to bike. Black, of course.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dcb View Post
    Not sure who needs tire leverS? Usually you don't need any but on rare occasions 1 will do. I like clips but the problem I've encountered with them at times is that they don't fit every saddle rail. For that reason velcro may be a safer bet. Plus it's easier to move from bike to bike. Black, of course.
    I am happy to tell you that our clip design has a way to adapt to most saddle rails

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