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  1. #1
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    Whatís next ? ( got almost run over)

    Iíll make it short, yesterady during a overtake a motorist (cyclist himself) had a split second decision to take : ran me over and possibly kill me or drive off the road and total his car. Luckily he chose the second option.
    Shakey and orrified iíve decided to keep on going with my ride and of course it took me a full 2 hours to get back with myself.
    But what is next now ? My 8k euro brand new Colnago has a totally different mean to me now,I canít yet elaborate if iím just plain scared or whatever else. Seriously thinking of picking up gravel as there is no way iím going back mtb..

    Has this ever happened to you ? Should I just take some time off the bike ? I have a 3 years old kid ffs..
    Last edited by Devastazione; 12-13-2018 at 09:19 AM.

  2. #2
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    Hard to say as this is very particular to your exact situation. Was there anything that could have been done avoid the situation as in choice of roads, being more attentive to when a car is trying to pass etc and there are oncoming cars?

    I've had some close calls that required emergancy braking and have had cars buzz me but I've never had a situation where I'm almost run off the road. We tend to stick to quite back roads or when they are busier roads they usually have a wide breakdown lane. I haven't had anything happen that made me want to "switch" to gravel or mtb. My most serious injury biking has been on a mtb when I went over the bars in a rock garden and broke a rib. I have an 11 yo and a 2 yo.

    I've also seen my dad (62 next month) injure himself pretty bad without the involvement of any cars on a completely empty road (rut/crack on a curve) where he factured several vertabrae, dislocated shoulder, broken ribs, fractured orbital. Luckily I was with him to call 911. This was a couple years ago and he is now a little shorter but was back on the bike as soon as he was able to.
    Last edited by taodemon; 12-12-2018 at 09:27 AM.

  3. #3
    Slowski
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Iíll make it short, yesterday during a takeover a motorist (cyclist himself) had a split second decision to rake : ran me over and possibly kill me or drive off the road and total his car. Luckily he chose the second option.
    Shakey and orrified iíve decided to keep on going with my ride and of course it took me a full 2 hours to get back with myself.
    But what is next now ? My 8k euro brand new Colnago has a totally different mean to me now,I canít yet elaborate if iím just plain scared or whatever else. Seriously thinking of picking up gravel as there is no way iím going back mtb..

    Has this ever happened to you ? Should I just take some time off the bike ? I have a 3 years old kid ffs..
    My advise would largely depend on what size the Colnago is and your willingness to ship it.

    Seriously, the choice to take time off, or quit all together depends on your perception of risk verses reward. If it is just not worth what you perceive to be an unacceptable level of risk, then don't do it. If you simply need a break, do that. I would suggest maybe look at different routes, the visibility of your bike and your kit, and if there are groups that you can ride with. Fear sucks, and can suck the enjoyment out of an activity that should be fun. By mitigating the risks perhaps you will lessen the fear.

  4. #4
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    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  5. #5
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    TBH every time I think about Michele Scarponi it really gets me down. It shouldn't be as unsafe as it is to ride the roads. Cell phones, drunks, idiots... drunk idiots talking on their cell phones... just too many of them.

  6. #6
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    I've been bounced off of the front end of vehicles twice, the 1st time in the later '70s where I ended up in the hospital for a week, my bike was totaled and the car had over $700 damage(70's dollars). Stuff happens.

    On another note, the guy that owned the tavern that my Grandfather hung out at was partially paralyzed from falling out of bed when he was a kid.

    Can't stop living your life because of what may, or may not, happen.
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  7. #7
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    Life is too short. And you can do everything right--and still get hit and killed by a distracted or drunk idiot. Around these parts, amazingly, a drunk idiot got jail time for hitting and killing a local racer/organizer and activist and all around good man:

    https://journalstar.com/news/local/9...34780dafa.html

    I deal with it by riding much less on paved roads. Most of my miles are now on rails/trails and gravel roads. Drivers give much more room, are generally travelling slower, and take much more care. Oh, and there are a hell of a lot fewer of them.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  8. #8
    Devoid of all flim-flam
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    Try to ride easier, safer rides. If they aren't as fulfilling, so be it. When your confidence returns, gradually work your way back to what you were doing prior to the close-call. BTW, I did return to bicycling in the wake of a motor vehicle encounter that put me in a coma and kept me in the hospital for a couple months. To be sure, I was considerably less frisky on the bicycle...for reasons both psychological and physical.
    Last edited by Mapei; 12-12-2018 at 01:20 PM. Reason: grammar
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    BTW, I did return to bicycling in the wake of a motor vehicle encounter that put me in a coma and kept me in the hospital for a couple months.
    Jesus Christ man...planning to get back on the bike tomorrow but this one got me thinking..

  10. #10
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    Ride with some buddies for a few days before venturing out alone again. I got sideswiped and went over the bars and took a few stitches to the forehead. Pre -helmet days but i had practiced the tuck and role so no concussion. Called up my training partner for the next few rides and set a firm time to meet. I was pretty nervous before starting but once we met up there were no problems and after a few days I was back to normal.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Has this ever happened to you ?
    Pffffffffffffffffffffftttt! Between road biking, motorcycles and mountain biking; if I listed all the times I was seriously injured, almost ran over, hit, could have been killed (exiting the track at over 100mph, I'm going to have to go out on a limb here and say "not on everyone's bucket list") , I wouldn't do half the stuff I do. It all depends on how you deal with it. I have no time to waste thinking about. I know there is a possibility something might happen, I just don't dwell on it.

    If I had kids my attitude would probably be different. I'd still go out and ride. Maybe not as often.

  12. #12
    xxl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Iíll make it short, yesterday during a takeover....
    What's a "takeover?"

    Is this something like a Critical Mass event?
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by xxl View Post
    What's a "takeover?"

    Is this something like a Critical Mass event?
    Sorry,I meant overtake. Sorry,English is not my first language.

  14. #14
    xxl
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Sorry,I meant overtake. Sorry,English is not my first language.
    No problem. I thought perhaps it was yet another bit of hip post-Millennial slang I wasn't aware of.

    Glad you survived.
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  15. #15
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    I was brushed by the tires of a large semi-trailer a few months ago and came really close to quitting. However, I love this sport. I love the camaraderie, our group rides, striking out on my own to explore new roads, and the health benefits that cycling provides.
    Rather than quit I decided to look at the way I ride (position on the street), visibility issues and preventative measures that will reduce my chances of becoming a statistic. In short, you can reduce your risks but never eliminate them. Statistically, I believe that a side and or a front end crash is more likely event but I worry more about whatís behind me.. I used to hug the extreme right side of the road but learned that if I took more of the lane that cars would not try to slide by but would have to make a real attempt to pass me, safer for the cyclists. I bought a small light for my helmet and a brighter light for the rear of my bike. I try to plan rides to keep from riding into the sun and to be as visible as possible. I ride defensively; I watch the traffic in front of me and react accordingly.
    Iím glad you survived and hopefully we will see ya on the road again..


  16. #16
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    Maybe look into the Garmin Varia stuff. I know it won't stop anyone from hitting you but can make you more aware of when cars are coming up behind you. I don't use it myself but one of the guys I ride with has it and it is pretty impressive how early he calls "car back".

  17. #17
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    This is a tough question due to the 3 yr old. I mean, if you die, that 3 yr old is not going to have a dad and his life instantly becomes difficult without him/her realizing it yet.

    Having said that, we/you need to understand what could be done to avoid the situation. Was visibility an issue? Was the road an issue? If it's an accident, then it's usually something that could have been avoided, and we need to know what could have been done. There are many people in the cycling world and the motorcycling world that ride for decades without having a "close call" near death, and usually the common themes among these folks are they they're very careful riders and they make themselves visible.

    Having said that, in my opion, here are the factors that I have found or believed to mitigate risk greatly:

    1. ride in a group, 2-4 people is a nice group. Most fatal hits involve solo cyclists.
    2. use BRIGHT front and rear lights. This works well for drivers about to make a right- or left-hook or pulling out/in of parking lots.
    3. wear visible clothing. I know not everyone will like to wear neon-yellow on every ride, but using hi-vis clothing on certain "high risk" roads is prudent, which leads to my next point
    4. avoid high risk, high speed road if possible
    5. learn when to take the lane, when to take the shoulder, and when to just avoid the road completely. Unfortunately, ususally you need ride these roads a few times to gain the experience, and hope that you don't get hit during your experience-accumulating process
    6. ride only at times of days that is low traffic. I try to avoid riding on weekdays and do longer weekend rides. If I do ride during weekdays, it'll be between 10 AM - 2 PM when everyone is in their work office. I neve ride 7 AM - 10 AM or 3 PM - 6 PM because this is when folks are getting to/from work, and they are in a rush. Simply put, the less cars there are, the less chances of being hit by them. I don't do "just riding along" on the road anymore unless I'm going on the road to get to a bike path to do my riding

    All in all, I mitigate my risks by doing the combination of the above. I have ridden on the road on and off for probably 10 years now, and I have not had one "close call" due to drivers not able to see me. I've had some ahole drivers who purposely flipped me off, or drivers that see me but still try to squeeze thru me or make a turn in front of me anyway, and I have spotted all of them and slow my speed down in them to let them by. But, all things considered, I'm ok with the aholes who "see me", because if they see me, they won't hit me (despite their ahole actions).

    Lastly, get a great life insurance. You need life insurance anyway, cycling or no cycling.

  18. #18
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    What is next ? ( got almost ran over )

    Zwift?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    This is a tough question due to the 3 yr old. I mean, if you die, that 3 yr old is not going to have a dad and his life instantly becomes difficult without him/her realizing it yet.

    Having said that, we/you need to understand what could be done to avoid the situation. Was visibility an issue? Was the road an issue? If it's an accident, then it's usually something that could have been avoided, and we need to know what could have been done. There are many people in the cycling world and the motorcycling world that ride for decades without having a "close call" near death, and usually the common themes among these folks are they they're very careful riders and they make themselves visible.

    Having said that, in my opion, here are the factors that I have found or believed to mitigate risk greatly:

    1. ride in a group, 2-4 people is a nice group. Most fatal hits involve solo cyclists.
    2. use BRIGHT front and rear lights. This works well for drivers about to make a right- or left-hook or pulling out/in of parking lots.
    3. wear visible clothing. I know not everyone will like to wear neon-yellow on every ride, but using hi-vis clothing on certain "high risk" roads is prudent, which leads to my next point
    4. avoid high risk, high speed road if possible
    5. learn when to take the lane, when to take the shoulder, and when to just avoid the road completely. Unfortunately, ususally you need ride these roads a few times to gain the experience, and hope that you don't get hit during your experience-accumulating process
    6. ride only at times of days that is low traffic. I try to avoid riding on weekdays and do longer weekend rides. If I do ride during weekdays, it'll be between 10 AM - 2 PM when everyone is in their work office. I neve ride 7 AM - 10 AM or 3 PM - 6 PM because this is when folks are getting to/from work, and they are in a rush. Simply put, the less cars there are, the less chances of being hit by them. I don't do "just riding along" on the road anymore unless I'm going on the road to get to a bike path to do my riding

    All in all, I mitigate my risks by doing the combination of the above. I have ridden on the road on and off for probably 10 years now, and I have not had one "close call" due to drivers not able to see me. I've had some ahole drivers who purposely flipped me off, or drivers that see me but still try to squeeze thru me or make a turn in front of me anyway, and I have spotted all of them and slow my speed down in them to let them by. But, all things considered, I'm ok with the aholes who "see me", because if they see me, they won't hit me (despite their ahole actions).

    Lastly, get a great life insurance. You need life insurance anyway, cycling or no cycling.
    Belive me,except for the fact that I was riding solo I did ALL of the above. Iíve been using daylights for more tha 4 years now,my friends consider me a nerd. But it happened anyway,even if I live in the most isolated region of my country and tourists are all gone. Thatís why the whole thing pisses me off so bad even more..
    Last edited by Devastazione; 4 Weeks Ago at 08:46 AM.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Belive me,except for the fact that I was riding solo I did ALL of the above. Iíve been using daylights for more tha 4 years now,my friends consider me a nerd. But it happened anyway,even if I live in the most isolated region of my country and tourists are all gone. Thatís why the whole thing pisses me off so bad even more..
    Then it appears that you have encountered an act of god. Tough call. But I think overall nobody will be able to go thru life and avoid all risks. In spite of all the close-call stories we read on a cycling forum, I think it's still a statiscally safe sport if you follow most of things you are following. Can't do much about riding solo if you have no buddies to ride in a group.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by aclinjury View Post
    Then it appears that you have encountered an act of god. Tough call. But I think overall nobody will be able to go thru life and avoid all risks. In spite of all the close-call stories we read on a cycling forum, I think it's still a statiscally safe sport if you follow most of things you are following. Can't do much about riding solo if you have no buddies to ride in a group.
    I pretty much guess so.

    Had the chance to do a group ride with a bunch of racers two days ago. It felt relatively safer and enjoyable. But at some point I've visualized my son smiley face and I guess a panic attack kicked in : I started to hear cars from behind with engines and rolling tires roaring a lot more than reality,became short of breath and my whole body stiffened up. Took me a bunch of deep breaths and reality checks to pull myself together. I definitely need some time off the bike.

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