What road bike to buy ? And on budget :) - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    It’s so hilarious to me how in almost every thread like this we start going in on each other’s ideas and completely lose sight of the OP and their needs in the process. Happens every single time lol. Welcome to RBR I guess. Anywho, given your budget OP, I would say go to a a local shop or an REI and focus on their aluminum entry level road bikes. Like others have said, most brands have something solid to start with in the $500-900 range. Going this route will help you build a relationship with a shop and provide a warranty. Here are a few examples of what’s out there. Many of these may be cheaper at the shop than they are online this time of year.

    https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/contend-3

    https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Bi...ntid=undefined

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/al...=237236-154231

    https://www.rei.com/c/road-bikes?ir=...sort=min-price
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  2. #27
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    This is a newer version of what I started with in 2011. Great place to start if you can swing it. I rode the crap out of that thing. Good memories. Could last you years as you progress as well. The Giant Contend and Specialized Allez are great options too IMO.

    https://feltbicycles.com/collections...ance-road-bike
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 4 Weeks Ago at 01:29 PM.
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  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    OK then answer this: SQUARE TAPER ugh
    non SLR brakes ugh
    non brakeshifters? ugh
    non Hollowtech crankset (which takes an allen key to swap! vs a special crank puller for square taper)
    old bike with stretched chain, worn out cogs .. and the bike shops nearby not stocking a chain that works with 6 speed thread on cassette
    not a question. if it is, it's a misinformed one.

    who needs a bike shop in the 21st century when you have an address, a credit card, and the internet?

    that's a question. and the answer is no one.

    obsolete vintage stuff is great .. for vintage enthusiasts only.
    another completely misinformed opinion.

    you don't know what the word obsolete means. if you think it means "stuff for people who don't race professionally," then i guess you're right.


    it will require a fair amount of knowledge for a newbie to figure out the old stuff, what it's worth, how to fix it, where to get parts and tools, etc. Unlike the new stuff.
    true, and anyone can do it with a little patience and desire. then it pays off for the duration.

    I worked in the vintage age of the 70s and 80s in many bike shops and know the stuff well. I am AMAZED how much better a Claris or Tiagra groupset is to live with and work with in comparison!! And I mean Claris 2015 leaps and bounds better than Campagnolo Super Record 1978.
    it's all relative. suntour cyclone is plenty old and can do anything you ask it to do all day long over any terrain.
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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    not a question. if it is, it's a misinformed one.

    who needs a bike shop in the 21st century when you have an address, a credit card, and the internet?

    that's a question. and the answer is no one.



    another completely misinformed opinion.
    You are just assuming everybody is mechanically inclined or has the time to build/re-build bikes. Maybe you and I have mechanical inclination, but there are plenty of people who are either hamfisted or just have too much else going on in their lives.

    So please stop with the "nobody needs a bike shop" and "anybody can do it" crapoly. You sound really clueless when you talk like that.
    Last edited by Lombard; 3 Weeks Ago at 05:04 PM.
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  5. #30
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    You may also want to consider asking us for advice on...
    Helmets
    The choices can be a bit overwhelming at first.
    Especially if your going the vintage bike route, you will probably be looking for a more retro like look to complement.

    Just remember, we’re all here to help.
    Last edited by rudge66; 4 Weeks Ago at 06:59 AM.

  6. #31
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    I feel extremely comfortable saying it is helpful to have a bike shop to ask questions and take test rides when you are starting out for most people. No doubt about it in my mind. When you don’t know the difference between how race and endurance geometry or a size 56 vs a 58 feels to your body or how braking differs on rim or disc brakes or the ride quality difference between high end aluminum and entry level carbon, you can’t really figure those things out online. You need to experience them and talk to people to figure out what works for you. That’s my experience anyway and I buy lots of bike stuff online.
    Last edited by Rashadabd; 3 Weeks Ago at 12:54 PM.
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    You are just assuming everybody is mechanically inclined or has the time to build/re-build bikes. Maybe you and I have mechanical inclination, but there are plenty of people who are either hamfisted or just have too much else going on in their lives. So please stop with the "nobody needs a bike shop" and "anybody can do it" crapoly. You sould really clueless when you talk like that.
    yeah, i "sould really clueless."
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  8. #33
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    It's very easy to say "buy a vintage bike and learn how to fix it yourself", and "with enough patience, anyone can do it" on the internet.

    I'll fully disagree with this. I'm an experienced bicycle and automotive mechanic. Pretty much can fix anything, minus a frame issue. But I bought my wife a new bike last year, and the first thing I did when shifting and the braking was a little out of wack, was take it to the shop I bought it from. I didn't have time to fix it and didn't cost me a thing to get it adjusted.

    Also, for the OP, being new to cycling, it's going to take him quite a bit of time to learn how to properly repair a bike.

    I have had customers who tried to learn, and ended up costing them more to fix the problem AFTER they had messed with it, then it would have been had they brought it to me in the first place. Some people are mechanically declined or they have zero interest, time or patience in learning how to fix a bike.
    You can't fix stupid.

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  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    OK then answer this: SQUARE TAPER ugh
    non SLR brakes ugh
    non brakeshifters? ugh
    non Hollowtech crankset (which takes an allen key to swap! vs a special crank puller for square taper)
    old bike with stretched chain, worn out cogs .. and the bike shops nearby not stocking a chain that works with 6 speed thread on cassette

    obsolete vintage stuff is great .. for vintage enthusiasts only. It will require a fair amount of knowledge for a newbie to figure out the old stuff, what it's worth, how to fix it, where to get parts and tools, etc. Unlike the new stuff. I worked in the vintage age of the 70s and 80s in many bike shops and know the stuff well. I am AMAZED how much better a Claris or Tiagra groupset is to live with and work with in comparison!! And I mean Claris 2015 leaps and bounds better than Campagnolo Super Record 1978.
    You forgot to be offended by threaded steerers and quill stems.
    Too old to ride plastic

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    You may also want to consider asking us for advice on...
    Helmets
    The choices can be a bit overwhelming at first.
    Especially if your going the vintage bike route, you will probably be looking for a more retro like look to complement.

    Just remember, we’re all here to help.
    Like this one?

    Name:  hairnet.jpg
Views: 114
Size:  10.3 KB
    Too old to ride plastic

  11. #36
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    My guess is the OP saw how looney this place is and left long ago.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rashadabd View Post
    My guess is the OP saw how looney this place is and left long ago.
    meh, if someone is too delicate to deal with innocent forum blather, they're not likely to survive riding in traffic...

    reading contentious and snarky posts is tame compared to the abuse you can get on the road.
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  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oxtox View Post
    meh, if someone is too delicate to deal with innocent forum blather, they're not likely to survive riding in traffic...

    reading contentious and snarky posts is tame compared to the abuse you can get on the road.
    Yeah, there is definitely a logical correlation between those things, lol. I don’t think it’s necessarily a sensitivity issue on their part either. Sometimes this place can just be a turnoff even for vets. It’s a taste thing more so.
    Every climb has its end, for verily with difficulty there is relief...

  14. #39
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    Well …. I have to say, if a person was getting a first car, knew nothing about cars, and had neither tools, nor a shop, nor any mechanical experience, no one would suggest getting a vintage car which needed work.

    Nothing I can think of would be more of a turn-off to someone who wanted to get into cycling, than buying a bike, being all excited, taking it home, going out to ride, and finding one more thing wrong every time he left his driveway.

    Sure, some folks can fix their bikes …. But a person who just spent all his cash on a bike, doesn’t want to wait for two weeks to buy tools, he wants to ride his freaking bike. He doesn’t want to spend all his free time watching YouTube videos, trying to figure out which ones actually apply to his situation … and looking for videos which deal with decades-old parts as opposed to new ones. He doesn’t want to spend his time scouring the internet trying to figure out which parts he has, and what replacements will fit.

    (Interesting … it turns out that for a while, Raleigh had a proprietary BB spec which was just close enough to BSA that a BSA BB would thread in … and never come out. That’s the kind of stuff you can’t always find online when dealing with a bike several generations out of production, when you don’t have a manual, the serial number list is missing huge swaths, and you don’t know what you are looking for anyway because it is your first bike.)

    Some guy who didn’t know a good bike from a bad one could get a beat-up bike and end up spending hundreds on having the shop repair it, because he literally didn’t know where to begin. (Anyone who has worked ion bikes knows about the creeping creak and the mystery tick, which goes away on the repair stand and comes back halfway through a ride …)

    Buying a vintage bike, unless the person knows somebody who knows the bike is ready to ride, is … well, it is buying a bike Not ready to ride, and a person who wants to ride a bike would be better served buying a bike he could ride. Seems pretty simple.

    Yes, for a person who has Already Invested in tools and training, who has already spent the time, money, and energy toget some basic repair and adjustment knowledge, can save a lot buying a older bike which just needs a little TLC. But we forget how much we have invested down through the years to get there.

    The guy who has nothing, starts from scratch … and he has to pay Somehow … in time, money, headaches, and days not riding his bike, to get the bike fixed up.

    It makes a lot more sense to buy a bike that already works and comes with a service agreement so the guy can roll on back to the shop I something isn’t working. If the rider cares, he can ask the mechanics about his bike …. Or look it up online, because the new bikes will have lots of related info online.

    That way the person can ride right out of the shop on his New Bike, and ride it all around any time he wants. Likely nothing will go wrong except some cable stretch, and he can get that fixed for free---and if he cares, can probably get a quick lesson on adjusting brakes and derailleurs from the mechanic. He can then take off riding again.

    People who come here wanting to buy a first bike don’t want a winter project—they want to Ride.

    Getting them out on the roads or trails on solid, reliable bikes is the kindest thing we could do for them.

    They aren’t going to appreciate the value of the tuned-up vintage bike until they have spent a few years riding, and learned some stuff … but if they try to start with that needs-work vintage bike, they might never stick with cycling.

    Me … I could buy an old bike … I have several, and like them a lot. But for someone who want to learn about Riding, not Repairing …. Get him a new bike.

  15. #40
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    Lots has been said here. My take from a guy who wasted all kinds of money on bikes back in tha day...and I'll state up front I don't know if you're just starting out or what.

    But if you are just starting out, you are likely best served to buy a vintage steel road racing bike (I assume this is your sport, not mountain biking) for about $200 on ebay and starting from there. Find every long group ride you can, talk to others about a good training program, and do the work. Do intervals after you've built up a couple months of good training base mileage each week.

    If you make it past six months, have a good set of wheels built. Light, well-built wheels will make a big difference. Keep riding.

    A year or two in, then you'll know if you want to spend more money on a new bike. eBay has plenty of great, vintage road bikes that'll get your started for the low price of $200 or so. How do I know? I ride a 32 year old Specialized Allez as my daily ride after trying the latest and greatest bikes. For entry-level races, the old tech will suit just fine.

    Bottom line: you'll do better with a less expensive bike that fits, with good wheels and tires, than going into debt for something newer.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    yeah, i "sould really clueless."
    So your only reply is to point out my typo? LAME.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    please stop with the ... "anybody can do it" crapoly.
    anybody can do it, given the time and gumption like i said earlier.

    there are those that say, "it's too hard" or "not everybody can do it." bullshît. if you have time, can turn a screw, lock two nuts together, and watch youtube, you can do it.

    it's not hard. that's why vintage is a great way to get into biking. you can buy a great bike for $2-300, some tools, and fix whatever needs to be fixed. it's all straightforward and makes simple sense. you can't say that about a lot of modern stuff where the technology and the necessary tools change nearly every year.

    to say otherwise is a defeatist mentality.

    it's also great for those on a budget. you can start small, flip a bike or two, and trade-up to whatever you want. after a year or two, you can put together a nice collection or maybe a nice modern bike that was out of your price range to begin.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    anybody can do it, given the time and gumption like i said earlier.

    there are those that say, "it's too hard" or "not everybody can do it." bullshît. if you have time, can turn a screw, lock two nuts together, and watch youtube, you can do it.

    it's not hard. that's why vintage is a great way to get into biking. you can buy a great bike for $2-300, some tools, and fix whatever needs to be fixed. it's all straightforward and makes simple sense. you can't say that about a lot of modern stuff where the technology and the necessary tools change nearly every year.

    to say otherwise is a defeatist mentality.

    it's also great for those on a budget. you can start small, flip a bike or two, and trade-up to whatever you want. after a year or two, you can put together a nice collection or maybe a nice modern bike that was out of your price range to begin.
    Come to think of it, maybe you should go back to criticizing my typos.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  19. #44
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    Kind Members let us not quarrel amongst ourselves.
    For surely we gather not to bicker, but rather to serve and counsel .
    I praise all contributions here in and all goodwill.

    However , does not a grave concern plague our minds and bear heavily on our soul’s?

    Where I pray is our dear Brother Julius?
    Does it not concern us that nothing has been heard of him; for well over five weeks now?
    Surely something grave , unspeakable must have occurred.

    Please Bro. Julius save this forum and your thread from its own peril and let us know you are well: lest our efforts be not in vain. Amen 
    Last edited by rudge66; 3 Weeks Ago at 06:57 PM.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Come to think of it, maybe you should go back to criticizing my typos.
    you're the guy that says, "it's too difficult."

    i'm the guy that says, "anyone can do it."

    i tend to believe in the human spirit and the will to learn.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    you're the guy that says, "it's too difficult."

    i'm the guy that says, "anyone can do it."

    i tend to believe in the human spirit and the will to learn.
    That is not what I said. You should go back and re-read what I wrote instead of putting words in my mouth.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  22. #47
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    Again, what we have here are people who seem to have forgotten how much time, money and energy it took to learn to be bike mechanics, advising someone who wants to Ride A Bike to instead buy a bike which needs repair and Learn to Repair Bicycles.

    I think learning to repair bicycles is great ... but it's not what the Original poster wants to do right now. But who cares ... after all, we are just here to support our own limited views, right? We aren't here to help people who want to start enjoying this wonderful activity, cycling, which has grown to be such a big part of all of our lives.

    Look at what you say Blackfrancois:
    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    i tend to believe in the human spirit and the will to learn.
    You acknowledge that learning to be a bike mechanic is a journey, a challenge a test of the will and spirit … And for You, it was ultimately a worthwhile journey, but you know there were obstacles.

    I am still on that journey … and there are Always obstacles.

    For anyone who wants to go through those travails I would offer all encouragement. It will be frustrating but also very satisfying, based on my experience.

    However … that is NOT what the OP wants.

    The OP wants to buy a bike he can ride Right Now. A bike which already works, a bike which a shop will fix if it needs fixing.

    If the OP later wants to delve into bike mechanics … Great!

    But that is NOT what the OP said he wants.

    We Could stop trying to force people to follow in our footsteps and instead actually listen to what other people are asking … that is an option we do have.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    you're the guy that says, "it's too difficult."

    i'm the guy that says, "anyone can do it."

    i tend to believe in the human spirit and the will to learn.
    Me too. But you forgot time. Some people's spirit and will pulls them in the direction or having better things to do with their time than learning bike mechanics.

    I'm sure the OP and any individual can decide for themselves if they want to delve into bike mechanics or just riding the thing.

    Over the course of several years I've learned to do most of my own work and now have the tools to do it. Getting all the knowledge and tools up front just to be able to ride would have been dumb, unless of course I was more interested in bike mechanics than riding.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    you're the guy that says, "it's too difficult."

    i'm the guy that says, "anyone can do it."

    i tend to believe in the human spirit and the will to learn.
    can just see the poor guy going into a nearby bike shop saying I bought this old bike and the stem is too long, what do you have for it .. and finding a selection of about 0 quill stems in all the 20 local bike shops. Then the 27x1-1/4 rear tire finally gives out when pumping up and the bike shop kids tell him such a size does not exist, they've never heard of it. Spirit is nice but end of his tether is where vintage will lead any newbie. It's too much a minefield

    don't get me wrong, I think vintage is cool, I own a much loved one myself. but it's like keeping a Model T in the garage. Has spirit, but is a wall ornament mostly
    Last edited by BCSaltchucker; 3 Weeks Ago at 08:13 AM.
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    can just see the poor guy going into a nearby bike shop saying I bought this old bike and the stem is too long, what do you have for it .. and finding a selection of about 0 quill stems in all the 20 local bike shops.
    and i can see thousands of other guys asking an internet forum for free suggestions and getting helpful answers in return telling him to go to his local co-op, shopping ebay, shopping for a new one online (like a nitto), and even getting some offers from forum members.

    Then the 27x1-1/4 rear tire finally gives out when pumping up and the bike shop kids tell him such a size does not exist, they've never heard of it.
    all the more reason to stay away from said bike shop. there's plenty of great tires in that size, or do like me and convert to 700c. or buy an '80s bike already with 700c wheels.

    Spirit is nice but end of his tether is where vintage will lead any newbie. It's too much a minefield. don't get me wrong, I think vintage is cool ...Has spirit, but is a wall ornament mostly
    more bullshît with a huge side of strawman.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

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