What road bike to buy ? And on budget :)
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  1. #1
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    What road bike to buy ? And on budget :)

    I'm trying to buy a new road bike, this is my first time to buy a bike and i dont know what to buy. Any suggestion ?? My budget is only $300 - $600

    Sent from my CPH1727 using Tapatalk

  2. #2
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    Most manufacturers have bikes at the top end of your budget. Head to your local LBS and test ride.

    I've always advised customers that 1/3 of the budget should be for accessories. My suggestion is to save a little longer so you have the funds to purchase the add ons - spare tube, seat bag, inflation kit (pump or CO2), cyclometer, helmet, clothes, etc.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by juliusciptajaya2000 View Post
    I'm trying to buy a new road bike, this is my first time to buy a bike and i dont know what to buy. Any suggestion ?? My budget is only $300 - $600
    Question. Is there a reason you want a road bike? Do you have cycling goals and/or expectations?

  4. #4
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    When you say this is your first time buying a bike, are you saying you're new to biking? What is your riding history? Do you ride in a bike share or are you new to riding?

    $300-600 won't get you more than a used bike or a knock-off brand. Even a new steel entry level road bike from a reputable brand will run you $700:

    https://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/questsport.html

    Good solid bike, but heavy as road bikes go. More money will get you better componentry and less weight. Also, as ferdfandc said, you will need to budget in necessary accessories like a helmet, clothes, spare tubes, seat bag, inflation kit (pump or CO2), cyclometer, etc.

    If you have a good bike shop near you, head on over there and test ride some bikes.


    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  5. #5
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    Do you have friends? Maybe someone is looking to upgrade and you can get a deal. $300-$600 is not a very friendly budget. You'll be getting something quite basic

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    I got my first bike at the link below, for $500, a while ago. It has about 10K miles and I'm still happy with it and looking forward to spring. At this point I've replaced almost everything. Be aware that if you buy on line you're mostly on your own regarding support. Budget for a helmet, pump, spare tubes, and at least enough tools to change a tire.

    I wouldn't buy anything used unless you know the seller.

    https://bikeisland.com/index.cgi

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtrac View Post
    I got my first bike at the link below, for $500, a while ago. It has about 10K miles and I'm still happy with it and looking forward to spring. At this point I've replaced almost everything. Be aware that if you buy on line you're mostly on your own regarding support. Budget for a helmet, pump, spare tubes, and at least enough tools to change a tire.

    I wouldn't buy anything used unless you know the seller.

    https://bikeisland.com/index.cgi
    Looks like most of the products on this site are either no-name brands or new/old stock. If my budget were severely limited and I wanted a bike, I would go for new/old stock on a known brand before I would trust a no-name brand.

    If you have replaced almost everything in 10K miles, you have probably spent at least $1,000 in new parts. Unless you enjoy replacing parts, you may as well have bought a $1,500 bike.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtrac View Post
    It has about 10K miles and I'm still happy with it and looking forward to spring. At this point I've replaced almost everything.
    In 10K miles on my bikes, I would have replaced only tires and a chain. Not sure you saved any money compared to a higher line bike that would have required only maintenance replacements.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by juliusciptajaya2000 View Post
    I'm trying to buy a new road bike, this is my first time to buy a bike and i dont know what to buy. Any suggestion ?? My budget is only $300 - $600

    Sent from my CPH1727 using Tapatalk
    Best bet would be a used bike, IMO. For $300.-600. you could get an aluminum frame with Shimano Ultegra or "105" shifters and rear derailleurs, and B or C level components, A being top of the line. It'll weigh 17-22#, a nice weight for climbing and a responsive ride.

    Correct size is essential. Determine from the online programs, and don't get the wrong size. Plenty of nice $1200. road bikes out there in NOS condition, people bought but never rode, wrong size, not enough time, too hard. Private sellers would gladly take $500., although they may ask for more.

    Factor in $300. for helmet, shorts, jersey, spare tube, tire levers, water bottles. Of course you don't have to get all that stuff right away. A $40 helmet will get you legal in most jurisdictions.

    I wore out at least 2 pairs of denim jeans and two pairs of khaki shorts before finally springing for padded lycra. Got strong and fit wearing t-shirts and tennis shoes before going to sweat wicking jerseys and nice stiff cleated shoes. Gloves are entirely optional.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Looks like most of the products on this site are either no-name brands or new/old stock. If my budget were severely limited and I wanted a bike, I would go for new/old stock on a known brand before I would trust a no-name brand.

    If you have replaced almost everything in 10K miles, you have probably spent at least $1,000 in new parts. Unless you enjoy replacing parts, you may as well have bought a $1,500 bike.
    Sometimes it's easier to spend over a period of time than all in one go. It's why I recommend sometimes for someone to buy the cheapest bike with the best frame they can get, then replace the components over time as parts wear out. Although these days, even the low end drive trains perform like the top end ones from a few years ago

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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    Sometimes it's easier to spend over a period of time than all in one go. It's why I recommend sometimes for someone to buy the cheapest bike with the best frame they can get, then replace the components over time as parts wear out. Although these days, even the low end drive trains perform like the top end ones from a few years ago
    Easier? Well it certainly is a false economy because buying the parts is WAY more expensive than buying them as part of a bike. Especially since in this buyer's price range he really should get a used bike. And at the quoted price range a new bike will have very low-end parts.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Easier? Well it certainly is a false economy because buying the parts is WAY more expensive than buying them as part of a bike. Especially since in this buyer's price range he really should get a used bike. And at the quoted price range a new bike will have very low-end parts.
    And a low end frame to match.

  13. #13
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    I did not say buy new, I said best frame they can get for their budget, which includes used. And while yes, new parts individually cost more over time, if you only have $X dollars to spend, you only have $X to spend. Spending $500 now, and then $50 here, and $100 there over time is feasible. Spending 600 now is not if you only have 500.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    I did not say buy new, I said best frame they can get for their budget, which includes used. And while yes, new parts individually cost more over time, if you only have $X dollars to spend, you only have $X to spend. Spending $500 now, and then $50 here, and $100 there over time is feasible. Spending 600 now is not if you only have 500.
    Well, sure, the used bike will not only be a better frame, but will also have better components, unless previous owner stripped them off and put cheaper stuff on to sell the bike.

    Chances are good, the way mid-level road bikes go, the used bike won't have all that many miles on it to require replacing components. Put on a new chain if the bike has over 2000 miles on it, maybe new cassette gears if over 6000 miles. Check the tires. If everything works, upgrades could be put off for another 10,000 miles. How long would that take?

    A high quality frame will have high quality components, except for wheels. Nobody notices the wheels, distracted by the 105 or Ultegra shifters and derailleurs, but cheaping out on the wheels is the first thing manufacturers do to lower the price. A nice set of wheels would be worth the investment. They could be transferred to the next build when the itch gets strong, and take care of the second most important component determining the ride quality of the bike, the frame being the first.

    Also, a $2000. bike with Ultegra might be the exact same frame as its budget oriented brother with 105 or Tiagra components, priced at $1500.

  15. #15
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    Save your money.the more you spend the longer it last. Don’t rush to buy!

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    Last years Trek 01 road bike was $600.00bucks now it’s 900.00! I’m sure the parts are better but spend more 𝐆𝐞𝐭 more!

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    Look for a used Cannondale with Shimano 105 components. If you don't know what to look for in a used bike ask around for help locally.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by juliusciptajaya2000 View Post
    My budget is ... $600
    buy a vintage* road bike in your size for $300, $100 in tools, $100 of additional components you may need, $100 worth of new consumables, and you will have a bike that will last forever along with the tools needed to maintain it. you'll also have the tools needed to overhaul and flip another bike to add funding to your future bike budget.

    .

    * chromoly frame or better
    * forged dropouts front and rear
    * cotterless 3-piece crankset
    * all aluminum components, incl. rims
    * on-frame rear derailleur hanger.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by juliusciptajaya2000 View Post
    I'm trying to buy a new road bike, this is my first time to buy a bike and i dont know what to buy. Any suggestion ?? My budget is only $300 - $600

    Sent from my CPH1727 using Tapatalk
    Based on all the info you have given, and the effort put forth by our family to provide assistance...
    I think you should buy This Bike
    Attached Images Attached Images

  20. #20
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    disagree on the vintage bike idea. so much of that tech is pretty bad, obsolete, harder to maintain and not supported these days, while even a bike with Shimano Claris is generations better and reliable. I lived through those years and so much is solved with modern inexpensive componentry, hollowtech cranks, brakeshifters, modern indexing, modern gearing, modern brakes etc.

    We were looking to buy some used road bikes to keep at my vacay home for visitors to use. Kind . of amazing how great a bike you can buy used for $250-350USD, really. Many fairly late model bikes with 2x10sp compact gearing and Tiagra, 105 or even ultegra. People buy these bikes for $700-1300 then never use them and put them up for sale cheap - in the US (here in Canada they do not do that - my dad buys a bike down there every winter and brings it to canada to sell for profit lol. His SWorks Venge Red was 1500usd in Tucson fercrissakes)
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  21. #21
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    Bike island is a scratch-and-dent outlet for Bikes Direct. If you do a little research you would find that Bikes Direct sells some decent bikes at decent prices. They are up front about what components are included and all that ... and the frames come from the same factories (like Kineses frames on some bikes) that sell frames to just about every other manufacturer.

    I have a fair bit of experience with the company (not an employee or shill) and i can attest to this: they sell solid bikes, with no BS.

    When you buy Trek or Cannondale---particularly low-end---a lot of what you are paying for is the decal on the down tube. There is only so much any company can do with that tight a budget.

    Check out the components on the Bikes direct bikes---they list them all---and tell me where the danger lies?

    The real issues with Bikes Direct for a new rider are fitting (you Can send the bike back and get a different size but you Will pay shipping and lose whatever you might have saved over going to a shop) and assembly and service.

    The bikes generally only need the handlebars, seat, and pedals attached, but they almost certainly will need a little adjustment to the cables ... and after a few rides, due to cable stretch, will need more adjustment, and while a bike shop would usually do that for free on a bike it sold, they will charge you for a bike you bought elsewhere.

    Also, about half of the two dozen I have dealt with needed some wheel retruing after a few hundred miles. I figure they were never stressed and retrued at the shop .... just made straight and stuck in the box.

    If the buyer knows what size s/he needs and/or can read a geometry chart, Bikes Direct offers excellent value.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Irons View Post
    Easier? Well it certainly is a false economy because buying the parts is WAY more expensive than buying them as part of a bike. Especially since in this buyer's price range he really should get a used bike. And at the quoted price range a new bike will have very low-end parts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fredrico View Post
    And a low end frame to match.
    I cannot recommend upgrading Any entry-level bike. As Fredrico notes, the frame isn't worth the better parts. And it does cast a Lot more to buy parts individually.

    The best way to get started cycling, though (unless you have a good friend who knows his stuff and can help you get a good used bike) is to buy cheap, ride the thing for a season or two, and be saving for an better bike the whole time. Don't put a penny into upgrading a loss-leader---it won't pay off.

    After a season or two hopefully a rider will know what kind of riding and thus what kind of bike, is best suited, and can go buy a "real" one (yeah, I know I will get flack for that, but we all know what I mean, so i will ignore the quibblers.)

    Starting out with a $500 bike and riding for two years beats getting the Wrong used bike and sinking several hundred into it. Truly, for a person who has never really ridden a bike .... who knows?

    The person might turn out to be a daily rider, a commuter, a weekend dabbler, a racer, or a century-each-weekend rider .... or might use the bike to take up space in the garage. The new rider might discover a love for gravel and rails-to-trails, and want a bike with really wider tires, or might want a bike with lugs for full racks and fenders for daily commuting.

    Get into biking for cheap, with a bike which will work reliably---which is often not a random used bike (yes, there are good and great deals, but a new rider won't know if s.he is buying a wreck or a gem.) A new bike---with all new components---will certainly last a few seasons (In my case, several thousands of miles) and will expose the rider to the varieties of cycling.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    disagree on the vintage bike idea. so much of that tech is pretty bad, obsolete, harder to maintain and not supported these days...
    that's all complete bs. actually, it's super easy and none of it is "obsolete." you can buy anything at the ready for vintage bikes and nearly anyone can overhaul everything on one of them, given the time and gumption.
    Yossarian: don't worry. nothing's going to happen to you that won't happen to the rest of us.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfrancois View Post
    that's all complete bs. actually, it's super easy and none of it is "obsolete." you can buy anything at the ready for vintage bikes and nearly anyone can overhaul everything on one of them, given the time and gumption.
    OK then answer this: SQUARE TAPER ugh
    non SLR brakes ugh
    non brakeshifters? ugh
    non Hollowtech crankset (which takes an allen key to swap! vs a special crank puller for square taper)
    old bike with stretched chain, worn out cogs .. and the bike shops nearby not stocking a chain that works with 6 speed thread on cassette

    obsolete vintage stuff is great .. for vintage enthusiasts only. It will require a fair amount of knowledge for a newbie to figure out the old stuff, what it's worth, how to fix it, where to get parts and tools, etc. Unlike the new stuff. I worked in the vintage age of the 70s and 80s in many bike shops and know the stuff well. I am AMAZED how much better a Claris or Tiagra groupset is to live with and work with in comparison!! And I mean Claris 2015 leaps and bounds better than Campagnolo Super Record 1978.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    OK then answer this: SQUARE TAPER ugh
    non SLR brakes ugh
    non brakeshifters? ugh
    non Hollowtech crankset (which takes an allen key to swap! vs a special crank puller for square taper)
    old bike with stretched chain, worn out cogs .. and the bike shops nearby not stocking a chain that works with 6 speed thread on cassette
    For a person who doesn’t have a shop full of tools and a head full of knowledge, buying a vintage bike is a bad idea, because the buyer will spend time Not riding.

    Does the potential buyer realize the difference between freewheel and freehub? 6-7-8 chain vs. 9,-, 10-, 0r 11-speed? Des the buyer know how to change cables?

    Does the prospective buyer have the right sized cone wrenches? Any cone wrenches? The specialized BB puller that bike needs?

    Will the buyer know the difference between a bent derailleur hanger and a badly adjusted derailleur?

    (A conversation on another site raised the issue that before about 1988, almost all frames were 126-mm rear dropout spacing---and thus could Not be fit with a modern wheel. Would a layman know that?)

    Does the buy want to buy a bike and go ride, or does the buyer want to take the bike home, strip it down, clean it up, and start making lists of parts to search for online. It is all out there—but not everything is compatible.

    The deal with getting a new bike is that everything already works, and if anything goes wrong, the buyer can go back to the shop for free service.

    On top of that … let’s all be honest, the new stuff works at least as well and generally better than the old stuff.

    Many of us came up through the years and have done lame sidepull brakes on steel rims and 2x6 friction shifters on 35-pound Schwinns. And most people don’t want to go back.

    As someone said above, new Claris is better than most stuff which was available twenty years ago. No one needs integrated brake shifters … but they are better. No one needs lighter, strong cranks, stems, frames, wheels … but we all want them.

    And yes … a person can get lucky and find that garage queen, the excellent bike that someone bought five years and never rode and is selling for a third of its sale price. A person can also wait for a long, long time for a bike which might never show up in that market.

    For quite a while I followed local listings for old steel-frame bikes because I have a lot of modern parts and enjoyed rebuilding them. And there simply aren;’t a lot being sold in my area. As for decent older bikes I could just get on and ride with just a little chain lube—forget it. Nada.

    If the OP lives in a market where he can find vintage bikes easily, and if he knows enough to pick a bike which is ready to go and not ready to junk … great. But no one who knows all that come here asking for general advice on a first bike.

    The OP needs a solid, reliable, Guaranteed ready-to-roll bike …. Not a fair chance to win or lose. And that means a new bike from a shop with a service contract (free tune-ups for a year at least.)

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