What is up with Giro riders' bikes???
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  1. #1

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    Unhappy What is up with Giro riders' bikes???

    I was watching yesterday's stage and noticed that everyone in the break was riding a bike that looked to be 2 sizes too small -- the seat posts had at least 14" exposed, and they were all hunched over.

    Is this the latest trend in bike fitting? I understand the flat back aero ideal position and all, but these guys looked pretty ridiculous and not a little bit uncomfortable.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Compact geometry is all the rage. Smaller, lighter, stiffer, faster is the theory. Personally I think they look goofy.

  3. #3
    Unrepentant Mountainbiker
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    They look just fine to me!

    But maybe that is just my MTNBiker side crossing over. We are used to seeing bikes with sloping top tubes.
    It's no fun unless it hurts!

  4. #4

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    within reason, I agree

    Quote Originally Posted by freezin_is_the_reason
    But maybe that is just my MTNBiker side crossing over. We are used to seeing bikes with sloping top tubes.

    I'm talking about what looks like a 6' rider on a bike that would fit Simoni with a shorter seatpost. I just don't get eet.

  5. #5
    Quit upgrading & ride!
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    So you won't like my De Rosa then! ;-)

    My "compact" pride & joy
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    Put me back on my bike

  6. #6
    DonRacer
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    Not all compact frames either...

    ... Petacchi is riding a regular frame, but it has a 54 c-c seattube and a 58 c-c toptube! He's about my size and I ride a 57 c-c in both dimensions.

  7. #7
    BrooklynVelo
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    You call that "compact"

    Now this is compact. My TCR team.
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  8. #8

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    that's more like it

    is there some advantage to this setup? I'd be curious to know what it is.

  9. #9
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Don't use hot water to wash that thing, it might disappear!

  10. #10
    BrooklynVelo
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    Believe it or not

    Quote Originally Posted by crashjames
    is there some advantage to this setup? I'd be curious to know what it is.
    This bike fits me like a glove. The TCR Team frame is light and stiff as it is, but in the small size it's extra stiff. Also the large drop between the saddle and the bars keeps me pretty aero, even on the hoods (not to mention what happens on the drops. I'm a pretty flexible guy with short legs and a long reach, so this works for me.
    Damn the Man, Save the Empire
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  11. #11
    off the back
    Reputation: rufus's Avatar
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    i noticed it with axel merckx last year. he's a tall guy and the bike he was on looked to be about two or three sizes too small for him. check him out if you can and see what you think.

  12. #12
    Old, slow, and fat.
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashjames
    I was watching yesterday's stage and noticed that everyone in the break was riding a bike that looked to be 2 sizes too small -- the seat posts had at least 14" exposed, and they were all hunched over.

    Is this the latest trend in bike fitting? I understand the flat back aero ideal position and all, but these guys looked pretty ridiculous and not a little bit uncomfortable.
    Latest trend? They've been doing that for years. Even when there wasn't such a thing as a compact frame the pros would have bikes built longer than stock. IIRC Boardman used to ride a 52cm ST x 57-8cm TT bike.

    Some of the guys I've seen on the Giro footage look like they need another fit session, but you can't argue that they're not faster than we are...

    M
    I've moved back to NoVA. PLEASE change the weather!

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by MShaw
    Latest trend? They've been doing that for years. Even when there wasn't such a thing as a compact frame the pros would have bikes built longer than stock. IIRC Boardman used to ride a 52cm ST x 57-8cm TT bike.

    Some of the guys I've seen on the Giro footage look like they need another fit session, but you can't argue that they're not faster than we are...

    M
    So what's the perceived advantage to riding this way? There are many pros who have more traditional frame setups (as in LA, Tyler, etc.) and they seem to do just fine.

  14. #14
    hi, I'm Larry
    Reputation: bimini's Avatar
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    I'm currious if Mutant body Geometry

    is a factor.

    Long legs, long arms, little bitty torsos and heads. At that level I'm certain that mutant genetics that are advantagious to pedaling come into play and probably creates some weird bike geometries to accomodate the freaks of nature.


    Quote Originally Posted by MShaw
    Latest trend? They've been doing that for years. Even when there wasn't such a thing as a compact frame the pros would have bikes built longer than stock. IIRC Boardman used to ride a 52cm ST x 57-8cm TT bike.

    Some of the guys I've seen on the Giro footage look like they need another fit session, but you can't argue that they're not faster than we are...

    M

  15. #15

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    It Makes Total Sense!

    The old school big tri-angular "A" frame bikes are more flexible. They are a little heavier, because you have all the unnecessary tubing around. Compact makes sense. All you care about is Top tube length and seat tube angle. You don't need 3x more tubing to achieve that! ;)

  16. #16
    Cipo's long lost cousin
    Reputation: Steve-O's Avatar
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    Moreau's bike

    Christophe Moreau's Bike makes my back hurt just looking at it... A while back there was a thread about his stem... Is that a 140 or 150mm length!?
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    "Cycling is like a church - many attend, but few understand." -- Jim Burlant

  17. #17
    Bike Dude
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    Changes, boo hoo

    Quote Originally Posted by crashjames
    I was watching yesterday's stage and noticed that everyone in the break was riding a bike that looked to be 2 sizes too small -- the seat posts had at least 14" exposed, and they were all hunched over.

    Is this the latest trend in bike fitting? I understand the flat back aero ideal position and all, but these guys looked pretty ridiculous and not a little bit uncomfortable.
    "Stop your bloody whining yewwwww!" (say it with a Scottish accent) The pros ride what the pros ride due to the sponsers and palm-greasing by the different bike manufactuers and suppliers. I didn't hear anyone whining when "expensive-nolo" (campy) came out with 10 speed. I didn't hear you guys whining when bikes went to crappy aluminum. Tell me something experts; why do aluminum bikes come with carbon on the rear triangle and carbon forks? Remember those shitty Canondales with the god-awful aluminum front forks?????!!!!!!! Ever ride one, pure ****! I've said it before and I'll say it again for the uneducated: "aluminum should be used for beer and not bicycle frames"! If I may quote the Foster Farms Chickens (I think they ride canondales) "you disgust me!" If you don't want to be one of the ten-percenters that have to follow every new fad, then don't!
    Just so you know, this is not a direct attack upon you. So don't get all bent out of shape like an aluminum frame.

  18. #18
    Get me to In&Out
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve-O
    Christophe Moreau's Bike makes my back hurt just looking at it... A while back there was a thread about his stem... Is that a 140 or 150mm length!?
    I think part of the deal with his bike is the fact he rides a KG486. They don't make the frame in 1cm increments, so I guess he opted for the one that was one size too small instead of one size too big.
    Cyclists really need to learn a little Rule #5.

  19. #19

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    let's see the winner's bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by crashjames
    I was watching yesterday's stage and noticed that everyone in the break was riding a bike that looked to be 2 sizes too small -- the seat posts had at least 14" exposed, and they were all hunched over.

    Is this the latest trend in bike fitting? I understand the flat back aero ideal position and all, but these guys looked pretty ridiculous and not a little bit uncomfortable.
    then we comment...
    www.flaviocolker.com.br
    i am in love w/a black woman.

  20. #20
    Opus was just napping
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thommy
    "Stop your bloody whining yewwwww!" (say it with a Scottish accent) The pros ride what the pros ride due to the sponsers and palm-greasing by the different bike manufactuers and suppliers. I didn't hear anyone whining when "expensive-nolo" (campy) came out with 10 speed. I didn't hear you guys whining when bikes went to crappy aluminum. Tell me something experts; why do aluminum bikes come with carbon on the rear triangle and carbon forks? Remember those shitty Canondales with the god-awful aluminum front forks?????!!!!!!! Ever ride one, pure ****! I've said it before and I'll say it again for the uneducated: "aluminum should be used for beer and not bicycle frames"! If I may quote the Foster Farms Chickens (I think they ride canondales) "you disgust me!" If you don't want to be one of the ten-percenters that have to follow every new fad, then don't!
    Just so you know, this is not a direct attack upon you. So don't get all bent out of shape like an aluminum frame.

    That was pretty filled with venom, did someone on a small bike drop you during the last group ride you were on? Worse yet was he on an aluminum bike with carbon stays? I have read alot of whining on this site over the years and that was just a simple question.
    Whining usually starts with, "I just started biking last week and can only average 25 mph on the flats, when am I going to get faster." So you might want to switch to decaf...
    In the time of battle you don't rise to the occasion you resort to the level of your conditioning...

  21. #21
    Old, slow, and fat.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve-O
    Christophe Moreau's Bike makes my back hurt just looking at it... A while back there was a thread about his stem... Is that a 140 or 150mm length!?
    In the old steel bike days you used to see this too... I remember looking at some of the guys' rides and scratching my head over the 130-140mm stems. They'd just ride a 52-3cm frame when they really needed a 55-6cm to get smaller, stiffer, lighter.

    Nothing's changed but the material the bikes are made out of. (remember when AL wasn't to be found in the pro peloton? I don't want no steenking Vitus!)

    M
    I've moved back to NoVA. PLEASE change the weather!

  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by crashjames
    I was watching yesterday's stage and noticed that everyone in the break was riding a bike that looked to be 2 sizes too small -- the seat posts had at least 14" exposed, and they were all hunched over.

    Is this the latest trend in bike fitting? I understand the flat back aero ideal position and all, but these guys looked pretty ridiculous and not a little bit uncomfortable.
    It works great... if you are an elite athlete with millions of dollars on the line. Most recreational riders can't manage such an extreme saddle-to-handlebar drop, and are probably better served by more traditional fitting. If you need both comfort and occasional aerodynamics, consider a higher bar position and a deep-drop bar. I wish Cinelli would bring back the Mod. 66 in a 26.0 clamp diameter and a 46 cm width.

    Gorilla bars rule.

    --Shannon

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thommy
    "Stop your bloody whining yewwwww!" (say it with a Scottish accent) The pros ride what the pros ride due to the sponsers and palm-greasing by the different bike manufactuers and suppliers. I didn't hear anyone whining when "expensive-nolo" (campy) came out with 10 speed. I didn't hear you guys whining when bikes went to crappy aluminum. Tell me something experts; why do aluminum bikes come with carbon on the rear triangle and carbon forks? Remember those shitty Canondales with the god-awful aluminum front forks?????!!!!!!! Ever ride one, pure ****! I've said it before and I'll say it again for the uneducated: "aluminum should be used for beer and not bicycle frames"! If I may quote the Foster Farms Chickens (I think they ride canondales) "you disgust me!" If you don't want to be one of the ten-percenters that have to follow every new fad, then don't!
    Just so you know, this is not a direct attack upon you. So don't get all bent out of shape like an aluminum frame.
    Just found and read a comment you posted about an aluminum framed Specialized Roubaix last month. Here is the interesting part:-
    "Great looking bike. Nothing beats a new bike......"
    Now I could have sworn you just said aluminum was not a suitable ("crappy") bicycle frame material.
    Admittedly it did have carbon stays and forks but still had that nasty "beer can material" for the rest of the tubes.;)
    "Better to light a few candles than complain about the dark"

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