when buying a new bike what should be a priority besides fit
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  1. #1
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    when buying a new bike what should be a priority besides fit

    I have a 2006 Specialized allez comp which has treated me well but i am looking to upgrade with a newer bike, looking to spend $2.5k or lower. Bottom line is i really dont know to much about components etc.. so a bike store salesman may be telling me all this great things and i wont know if they are great or not lol. Any tips or suggestions. Basically i go out and ride, plan is to get up there and do some long distance riding.

  2. #2
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    what is 'long distance riding'...?

    for some, that's 30 miles, others it's 130...

    what's wrong with your current bike that you want to improve on...?
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  3. #3
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    for one its hooked up to my trainer, i was looking to shed some weight, may be go tubeless, brakes, and i would like to do do 100 plus mile rides

  4. #4
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    apologies, but i think you are going about this all wrong. instead of asking us what your priorities should be , think about what your bike isn't doing well or failing in its mission. once you identify that you can decie how to best go about solving that problem.

    i'll give you an example. i like my c-59. its close to perfect but i do some cycling trips to europe with long descents and climbs. sometimes the weather doesn't exactly cooperate. my issue was braking under that environment so i thought about a bike, not quite gravel but that could accomodate 25 mm tires and more importantly disc while preserving those qualities i already like.

    my analysis had me focusing on upgrading to disc in this example. your example could be a different feature.

  5. #5
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    Color... definitely color... red is faster. lol

    As you already stated, fit is most important. As for components, at your price range, you will be mechanical, not electronic unless you find a heck of a deal.

    Anymore the components are all fine. Shimano 105, or Sram Apex or anything better will work fine if set up correctly. For components at the higher levels you get higher cost and lighter weight and some gains in crisper shifting and some functionality. I'm guessing for a carbon frame you will end up with 105 or apex setup which is great performance for the price. You may be able to find an Ultegra or force setup on closeout somewhere, but that's just timing there.

    $2500 will get you a fine ride. Something along the lines of this : https://rideblue.com/road-store/axino-105 would be a very nice ride.

    Trek has a nice option.. https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...Code=black_red

    Have fun on your new ride.
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  6. #6
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    Tire size.

    A frame that allows higher volume tires can be run with lower volume tires, the reverse is not true. The larger volume tires will make your 100 mile rides more comfortable which equals easier. Many will also say the larger tires, as long as they're good quality, are faster. But the bike isn't tied to the high volume tires so you are able to run low volume tires if you prefer.

    The ability to run a larger volume tire is about the only thing that can't be upgraded on a given frame.
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  7. #7
    ngl
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    My recommendation would be for you to learn the differences between frames, groupsets, components, wheels etc.. There's lots of good information on Youtube. Also, visit some Manufacturer's Web Sites. Once you've narrowed down your search, test ride some bikes.

  8. #8
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    I suggest don't pigeon hole yourself to any particular type of bike and/or rides. Have the shop pull out all options within your budget, and test ride them all and see what feels "right" to you. From there, you can drill down to the details such as component choices. In short, how the bike feels should be your priority. I know plenty of folks that are hung up on frame type, components, brands, etc. and later discovered that they really didn't like the way the bike rode, and now they are stuck with it.

  9. #9
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    when buying a new bike what should be a priority besides fit

    Quote Originally Posted by velodog View Post
    Tire size.

    A frame that allows higher volume tires can be run with lower volume tires, the reverse is not true. The larger volume tires will make your 100 mile rides more comfortable which equals easier. Many will also say the larger tires, as long as they're good quality, are faster. But the bike isn't tied to the high volume tires so you are able to run low volume tires if you prefer.

    The ability to run a larger volume tire is about the only thing that can't be upgraded on a given frame.
    Agree. You ride now and your goal is volume so I’d think comfort is a priority. Wider tires can help a lot. Frame geometry is also important. Some bikes are designed for responsiveness, crit racing and they can have characteristics very different than a bike that’s built to ride for hours. Of course, your terrain, your flexibility and other things will have significant impacts on your choice, but the actual geo can’t really be changed, I mean you can try with fitting, but a frame is what it is... Comfort Geo is popular. Frames tend to favor more upright riding position. There is a lot of good feedback here...
    Last edited by PBL450; 03-13-2019 at 09:40 AM.
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  10. #10
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    I would get one with a threaded bottom bracket and as others have said, with forks/chain stays large enough for 28 tires.
    Test a bike with sram & shimano to determine which of those you like.
    Having flat top handlebars are nice. As far as carbon/alum frame, not a huge deal, get one you think is nice.
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  11. #11
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    Pretty much everything current with disc brakes can handle 28mm tires without issue. Quite a few come with 32's. With a $2500 budget, a 105 carbon road bike will be your market area with money left over to upgrade wheels to go tubeless.

    But I would focus on fit. The bike that fits you the best will be the most comfortable, no matter what the ride distance is.
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  12. #12
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    Look at Canyon. $2500 gets you what $4k would at Trek or Specialized. I have a Trek and love it, but definitely check out Canyon.

  13. #13
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    Short answer: Fit.

    Long answer: Test ride a lot of bikes and see what "wows" you and makes you want to ride more. Which bike makes you smile when you ride it? The more you want to ride, the more you WILL ride and the stronger you will get. Don't focus on brand. There are many great brands out there. I would pick something that has room for wider tires. Disc brakes are nice, but not really necessary unless you will be riding a lot in wet or dirty conditions. However, disc brake bikes generally have more clearance for wider tires. Shimano 105 components are the "work horse" and a good level to shoot for. I have bikes, one with 105, the other with Ultegra and can't tell a difference - they both shift flawlessly, so IMO, Ultegra components aren't worth the extra $$.

    Did I mention fit? Yep, the bike that fits you right will make you more efficient on the bike and you will be less likely to develop aches and pains or repetitive use injuries which will make you stop riding. On this note, make sure the shop you choose will give you a detailed fit where they will put you and your new bike on their trainer, watch you pedal and make fine adjustments to tweak your fit just right. Choosing the right shop is just as important as choosing the right bike.

    Good luck!
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  14. #14
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    The most important thing of ALL...everything else comes second :

    do you like the bike ? do you go crazy about how it looks ?

    Seriously, you have to ogle at your bike even when on a bike stand,everything else will follow..

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chain View Post
    Color... definitely color... orange is faster. lol

    As you already stated, fit is most important. As for components, at your price range, you will be mechanical, not electronic unless you find a heck of a deal.

    Anymore the components are all fine. Shimano 105, or Sram Apex or anything better will work fine if set up correctly. For components at the higher levels you get higher cost and lighter weight and some gains in crisper shifting and some functionality. I'm guessing for a carbon frame you will end up with 105 or apex setup which is great performance for the price. You may be able to find an Ultegra or force setup on closeout somewhere, but that's just timing there.

    $2500 will get you a fine ride. Something along the lines of this : https://rideblue.com/road-store/axino-105 would be a very nice ride.

    Trek has a nice option.. https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...Code=black_red

    Have fun on your new ride.
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  16. #16
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    First and foremost geometry as it relates to both fit and handling. A frame that fits perfectly is no good if it handles like a track bike and you like relaxed 120 miles rides with a rack.

    Tire clearance can be a big issue for some. Should be a big issue for others who don't know any better. No downside to having a lot of it.

    Depending on use fender and rack mounts might be a considerations.

    Some components are better than others but if that's what the sales dude thinks the most important thing to talk about is he doesn't have your interest in mind. Not saying he's trying to screw you, he probably just doesn't understand what makes a "good" bike for a particular person and purpose.

  17. #17
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    at that pricepoint most mainlin companys will be very close as to what you get. Get a bike that fits from a shop near you that has a color you like. Dont overthink it. If you can afford more spend more.

  18. #18
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    If you search around you might find a leftover model with Di2 well with in your budget. If you know it will fit you.
    Have fun in your quest.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmach View Post
    If you search around you might find a leftover model with Di2 well with in your budget. If you know it will fit you.
    Have fun in your quest.
    I agree with bmach. Be careful with the price though.

    Prices depend very much on location and the wheel-builder, but using top end components say $200 for Hope hubs, $100 for Sapim spokes and maybe $300-ish for Enve rims leaves just the build cost and this varies.

    Good luck.

  20. #20
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    thanks for all the replies. I am starting to visit local shops to get some info and doing some research as well.

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