"Who's friendlier, roadies or mtb'ers" continued...
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  1. #1
    Nat
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    "Who's friendlier, roadies or mtb'ers" continued...

    This topic has come up a lot in the past few weeks, both here and on mtbr.com. I even had a couple of mtb'ers bring it up when we met out on the trail. It's been my experience that both groups are equally friendly, but then again I dress the part when I do each activity, and I smile a lot.

    I've noticed friendliness and coldness from both camps, but I thought of one possible reason that some people get more greetings on an mtb: When you pass someone on singletrack, you're within inches of them, so you're almost within their personal space. You can look them in the eye and make out their facial features.

    On the road, someone going the opposite direction is 20, 30, 40 feet away or more. It's not as personal.

    I've noticed that when I ride mtb in winter with a full balaclava covering my face, most people look blankly at me and don't say "hi" unless I say it first. I think it's because I'm faceless, anonymous, and they can't see if my face is friendly or not.

    Discuss.

  2. #2

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    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

  3. #3
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by t0adman
    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
    Boring? I know, I know.

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    The poor dead horse just wants a grave already. Nothing against you.

  5. #5
    A wheelist
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    Neither. The answer is - my street conner crack dealer, that's who.
    .

  6. #6
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    MTB riders generally seem to be friendlier than roadies; but no road bicyclist has ever buzzed by me close enough to knock me into the poison ivy at the edge of the trail.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  7. #7
    Nat
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    Quote Originally Posted by t0adman
    The poor dead horse just wants a grave already. Nothing against you.
    No offense taken. It's the same discussion I got into back in, ohhh, 1989 I think it was. I figured since the thread below got 600+ views and 30 replies since yesterday, someone was still interested in the topic.

  8. #8

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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    ..... but I thought of one possible reason that some people get more greetings on an mtb: When you pass someone on singletrack, you're within inches of them, so you're almost within their personal space. You can look them in the eye and make out their facial features.

    On the road, someone going the opposite direction is 20, 30, 40 feet away or more. It's not as personal.

    Discuss.
    I posted the same topic on this board back in 2001 when I was new to road cycling. After riding mtn bikes for 14 years, I was a little taken back by what I saw as snobbiness by other road cyclists.
    But I think you're right, I don't think roadies are less friendier, I think it's more of the nature of the sport. In mtn biking you're passing the cyclist by a few feet and things are coming at you quicker and changing much more often than on the road., you're focused on fast changing terran. Mentally, your more "heads up" and you "see" the other riders.
    On the road your workout is covering alot more mileage over a much longer period of time. You're just are alot more "Heads Down" or more focused for the long haul.........a look and a nod from across the road is much easilier missed.....

    That's my two cents.......

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