Worksman Cycles makes the Wall St Journal
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    waterproof*
    Reputation: Creakyknees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    41,589

    Thumbs up Worksman Cycles makes the Wall St Journal

    * not actually a Rock Star

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    226
    At the risk of sounding like a grumpy old guy ... I'm not sure I 'get' the concept of these 'hauler' bike's. They're cool to look at and probably even build - but $3000-5000 per?

    Going back to my delinquent youth where I spent my summers in Germany, many craftsman had simple wood bodied bike trailers. They just hung off the back of your regular bike. I used them to haul all kinds of stuff around.. The pros far outweight the cons - riding your bike, no weird geometry sacrifices, no major handling issues (weight aside, but the hauler bikes will have the same problem). They’re cheap, reliable, and did I mention you get to ride a normal bike that functions just like a normal bike w/o the trailer?

    And apparently they're even good for naps!!
    Dienstmannschlaf.jpg

    Maybe I should start building hipster cool trailers...

  3. #3
    waterproof*
    Reputation: Creakyknees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    41,589
    Quote Originally Posted by ClancyO View Post
    At the risk of sounding like a grumpy old guy ... I'm not sure I 'get' the concept of these 'hauler' bike's.
    I think $3-5k is the very high end... most are around/under $1k, and they are definitely not intended for the roadie enthusiast crowd... target market is big factories / campuses and they expect the riders to be regular people just using the bikes as a tool, a piece of capital equipment, a cog in the machine, so, they are built ultra-heavy duty, I mean you need to see one in person to realize what I mean... they are nearly indestructible.
    * not actually a Rock Star

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    1,100
    As Creaky said, a well-built work bike is pretty indestructible. Things like heavy duty frame with all powder-coated parts, good roller brakes, fully enclosed chain, internally geared rear hub, and stainless everywhere else all adds up. When you're carrying heavy loads a really solid bike with good geometry is worth a ton. A well made bike like this with heavy duty front and rear racks and center stand will be about $1500 - $2000 but worth it. You can spend less but end up with a bike thats squirrelly under load and requires a lot more maintenance.

    The front box bakfiets is great for hauling cargo and kids. It's easier to maneuver than a trailer, can carry a lot more weight, and for kids is great because they're in front of you where you can have a conversation instead of behind you looking at your butt all day. Similar to above, a well-made one that handles well and will last a couple of decades will cost you about $3k, but worth it.

  5. #5
    Matnlely Dregaend
    Reputation: DrSmile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,745
    CNN just had a video on Worksman:

    This is the last big U.S. bike maker - Video - Small Business

    Kind of sad that they're all that's left. Then again, there are lots of smaller U.S. builders that make high end stuff.
    “Bicycling has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world.” - Susan B. Anthony 1896
    "Cycling and ethical bankruptcy have always gone together." - Bike Snob NYC
    "White personifies this generation's obsession with superficiality, one in which a carefully curated social media post is more important than the actual ride" - Daimeon Shanks
    "I haven't been %^&* like that since I was an altar boy" Hank Moody

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    525
    When I first started my career, I worked at a huge chemical complex on the gulf coast. The instrument people had heavy industrial trikes and used them regularly. It wasn't unusual to see a sick gas chromatograph on one of them headed back to the shop for repair.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.