2020 Domane Gravel build - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    What a great looking awesome custom build bike! It looks very fast. You better be fast!

    I can't even imagine the amount of spare change lying around for such a beauty.

    Congrats!

  2. #27
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    Single, no kids, prime earning years. I'd rather have a wife and kids but that never worked out. So now I have time to train and a few bucks to spend on toys

  3. #28
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    Nice looking bike. I'm curious, do you also have a road bike? If so, how does this compare in terms of the size you selected? Did you go for the same top tube length as your roadie or something different? I'm planning on building a gravel rig this year. My two road bikes have 575mm top tubes. Not sure if I want the same size or not. I've heard some people go down a size for gravel and CX for a little more agility and standover room. TIA.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimV View Post
    Nice looking bike. I'm curious, do you also have a road bike? If so, how does this compare in terms of the size you selected? Did you go for the same top tube length as your roadie or something different? I'm planning on building a gravel rig this year. My two road bikes have 575mm top tubes. Not sure if I want the same size or not. I've heard some people go down a size for gravel and CX for a little more agility and standover room. TIA.
    Top tube is a useful reference point but what I look for is reach and stack. The height of my bars relative to the bottom bracket between my road and cross bikes is significant, ~60 mm or so. My goal with the Domane was to be about 30mm above my road bike bar height. My Cervelo S5 disc is very low in front, focused on aero. Fore-aft reach, I was aiming for about 10 mm closer than the reach on my S5. Those targets were impossible with the standard Domane geometry but fit perfectly with the optional Pro geometry.

    My cross bikes are shorter reach and taller bar height. Make sure you have measurements for the relationship between the bottom bracket centerline of the bars and seat. Then your relationship from the seat to the wheelbase will dictate weight distribution and how the bike handles. I did not intentionally choose a smaller frame for handling.
    Last edited by Emilio700; 01-29-2020 at 03:36 PM.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimV View Post
    Nice looking bike. I'm curious, do you also have a road bike? If so, how does this compare in terms of the size you selected? Did you go for the same top tube length as your roadie or something different? I'm planning on building a gravel rig this year. My two road bikes have 575mm top tubes. Not sure if I want the same size or not. I've heard some people go down a size for gravel and CX for a little more agility and standover room. TIA.
    Top tubes tend to be longer and stems shorter for gravel bikes ... the overall reach to the bars is basically the same, but the center of gravity is different on gravel bikes.

    I wouldn't use the same geometry as your road bike ... but look at what should be considered an equal size gravel bike for your size road bike ... so, S/M/L/XL, etc. figure out what those dimensions are and go from there.

    If you don't know ... test ride, test ride, test ride.

    Myself ... My set up is similar to that of my road bikes, however the reach is 1cm longer and the stem 1cm shorter. I'd prefer to have 2-3cm more reach in the frame with a shorter stem ... but I have a weird fit with long arms and body and short legs: If I get a bike with the correct reach, I can't stand over it and the bar is "WAY' to tall, so I have to size down 1-2 sizes and make it work.

    I have also eliminated all my road bikes now and just have my gravel bike with an extra set of wheels so I can switch out between road and gravel tires easily ... works just fine, but being on a 1x drivetrain the gaps can be a little large on the road, but not a huge deal overall since I'm not road racing any longer.
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  6. #31
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    Update after a few thousand miles of mostly offroad use. Had the nuts that hold the isospeed trunion in place come loose. Misdiagnosed as a loose headset so I rode on it for a while that way. Doh. Thankfully, the nuts (#22 in schematic) have a conical versus shank seat design. So the bosses in the frame weren't ovalized. A bit of tiny carbon fragments but I escaped a major frame repair. The nuts have an integral eccentric washer that keeps them from spinning as you turn the center bolt (#21) to torque down. The nuts were blue loctited from the factory. Cleaned and red loctited, then probably over torqued a wee bit. No play, all good now. The bolts on my Boone with front isospeed never came loose with maybe 3x the miles and a bunch of cross races. Maybe a different fastener design on the '18 Boone, dunno

    So if you have a 2020 Domane and ride it off road, might not be a bad idea to preemptively pull those fasteners and red loctite them to factory torque spec.

    isospeed_nut.JPG
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  7. #32
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    Update after a few thousand miles of mostly offroad use. Had the nuts that hold the isospeed trunion in place come loose. Misdiagnosed as a loose headset so I rode on it for a while that way. Doh. Thankfully, the nuts (#22 in schematic) have a conical versus shank seat design. So the bosses in the frame weren't ovalized. A bit of tiny carbon fragments but I escaped a major frame repair. The nuts have an integral eccentric washer that keeps them from spinning as you turn the center bolt (#21) to torque down. The nuts were blue loctited from the factory. Cleaned and red loctited, then probably over torqued a wee bit. No play, all good now. The bolts on my Boone with front isospeed never came loose with maybe 3x the miles and a bunch of cross races. Maybe a different fastener design on the '18 Boone, dunno

    So if you have a 2020 Domane and ride it off road, might not be a bad idea to preemptively pull those fasteners and red loctite them to factory torque spec.

    isospeed_nut.JPG

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  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emilio700 View Post

    So if you have a 2020 Domane and ride it off road, might not be a bad idea to preemptively pull those fasteners and red loctite them to factory torque spec.

    So what is the torque spec?

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSR View Post
    So what is the torque spec?
    I believe it is in the image posted of the parts list, 5.2nm
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  10. #35
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    Ah, I see it now. Thanks.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSR View Post
    Ah, I see it now. Thanks.
    Yah, tiny font if you'r viewing on your phone :P
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  12. #37
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    From Belgian Waffle Ride - Cedar City, UT. Oct 17
    2020_BWRCC_2_1024.jpg
    2020_BWRCC_1_1024.jpg


    Last edited by Emilio700; 4 Weeks Ago at 11:06 AM.
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  13. #38
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    Just saw this tread , some good info Emilio. And nice to finally see someone on this forum with the physical flexibility to set the bar/ stem height, in a similar fashion as me.
    After all, performance is comfort.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    And nice to finally see someone on this forum with the physical flexibility to set the bar/ stem height, in a similar fashion as me.
    Cervelo S5 disc is my road bike, about 2cm lower
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  15. #40
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    LOL you get it! ... fitness, flexibility, and bike fit; all come together to enhance performance. And comfort is the sum total.
    It doesn't work the other way around.
    I'm strictly on the road, Giant TRC, and winter/wet bike BMC RoadMachine.
    Both bikes kick ass.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by rudge66 View Post
    Just saw this tread , some good info Emilio. And nice to finally see someone on this forum with the physical flexibility to set the bar/ stem height, in a similar fashion as me.
    After all, performance is comfort.
    You're still obsessed with this, aren't you?
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  17. #42
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    Nice! Looks like you got second in your AG. Anything you'd change? Tire size, bardrop, gearing etc. Would love a report.

  18. #43
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    Uh-oh... looks like your knee is leaking!



    I'm still in love with that solid orange build

  19. #44
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    BWR Cedar City report and bike setup

    Quote Originally Posted by carlosflanders View Post
    Nice! Looks like you got second in your AG. Anything you'd change? Tire size, bardrop, gearing etc. Would love a report.
    Thanks.
    Results link from BWR CC https://www.omnigoevents.com/events/...y-2020/results

    Video from Vegan Cyclist (Tyler Pearce). We saw him during our pre ride and popped up in both videos
    Orange Domane, yellow safety vest, blinky lights and white helmet. You can see me several times up to about the 7 minute mark where he gets ahead of me.
    Race
    https://youtu.be/APie78U_c3I

    Pre ride
    https://youtu.be/FGH5k1SO5bk?t=424

    Joe Goettl's video really showed what the surface, race conditions and visibility were like at the front. I was about 10-20 riders behind Joe up until about mile 22.

    Bike was perfect save the mechanical that was my fault, details below. After pre-riding a bit I decided to go all in for low rolling resistance. Locally, I run like 30psi. For BWR CC I ran 45 F, 55 R in the 40c Pirelli Gravel H on 24mm internal wheels. It was fast and the right choice. Much of the dirt road sections were washboards but even running 30psi would not have changed the pummeling much. I rely on carbon bars, a good saddle and the Iso decouplers to do the shock absorption. So much of the course was hardpack or pavement that the tradeoff was worth it. If your bike handling skills aren't solid though, I would run lower pressure.

    The Gravel H is almost a slick in the center and has just a short tread off center. For this course, a solid center rib is a must. No need for huge tread lugs off center unless your handling skills are weak.

    Wish BWR allowed aero bars. I would have ran them.

    Ran my Bontrager Ion/Flare DRL's with remote button. Open public roads so a rear blinky is a must.

    The burly Bando cages are a must. No lost bottles. I calculated that 8x26 oz bottles would be just enough, barely. I ended up sucking down a 9th 21oz bottle at my 3rd stop.

    For fuel I relied on Hammer Perpetuem in 250ML hydrapak soft flasks. Each holds 675 calories mixed pretty thin. Caffeinated clif bloks just before last climb. French's mustard packets to stave off cramps. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B008L4NAMW
    Some folks prefer pickle juice or malt vinegar packets. Hammer fizz tablet for electrolytes in one bottle.
    Small top tube bag at stem and second, smaller TT bag up against seat mast plus what I had in my pockets.

    The mechanical was a recurring issue I've had with my Shimano drop bar hydro levers, rear brake going dead. Lever goes back with no resistance, losing rear brake. Turns out even when they feel bled, they can have a tiny air bubble trapped somewhere that gets knocked loose on rough terrain (washboard) and sucked into master cylinder, creating the dead lever. Crashed on first descent as a result, the bloody knee, sprained left hand and road rash on left hip. The correct bleeding procedure involves loosing the stem to rotate the bars back and forth to work any bubbles out. Also involves both using syringe to fill brake from caliper and pushing fluid back down from lever. My lack of thoroughness in prep cost me probably 30 minutes over race distance with the crash, no rear brake after mile 23 and needing to slow down on rough sections to reduce the pain in my left hand.

    I carry a spare tube and Trek multitool in the downtube compartment. Seat bag has patch kit, another tube, 2x 25g CO2's, inflator head, steel core lever, bit of microfiber to wipe hands.

    The race itself was intense, like the start of Kanza, BWR or any big gravel race. Full gas once the flag drops. Big watts just to stay anywhere near the front. Low to zero visibility with the dust. Sometimes gravel roads are all buffed hardpack. Other times there is a layer of pea gravel and silt on top. Often those layers are in long furrows like a plowed filed, made by the local car traffic. Most of BWRCC was the latter type, loose and ultra sketchy. You're blasting along at 25mph hitting these furrows longitudinally, catching front and back wheel and squirming around. Of course you can't see the furrows its as if you're riding at night without lights. Meanwhile you're just below threshold at 6,000' gasping for O2 but getting mostly dust. There must have been 5-10 crashes in the top 100 before we even hit the first real climb.

    My rear brake failed on the first descent when I was in the top 40 riders or so. After that my left hand was throbbing so bad I thought I broke a finger. I run my rear brake on the left so every descent was ridden sorta one handed, left hand floating on top while dragging front brake to keep speed/ vibration down. I'm typically one of the fastest descenders but at BWR, I got passed by everybody.

    Due to Covid, BWR allowed outside/personal feeds. There were 6 official stations but I chose to do just 3. Friend handing up bottles without me needing to stop. If you are going for a high placing in any gravel race and they allow outside feeds, I highly recommend getting someone to hand up bottles. Saves the long delay filling from a big cooler. Plus you can have specialized items you like, spares, tools, whatnot.

    After the 1st feed, the course flattened out with lots of wide gravel roads and a particularly intense section of double track through rolling terrain. This section of dusty double track made the main selections that stuck for the rest of the day. Grassy/rocky center between lanes on the double track meant the actual rideable groove you desperately tried to stay on was maybe 10" wide. Sand, rocks, holes, twisting, turning, up and down at 16-25mph but pretty much blind because of the dust. This wa by far, the hardest section to stay in the group I was in. Some 25 year old 180lb dude churning out 400w on the front it felt like.

    After that section we passed and aid station that dumped onto the first of a long paved section. At that point the groups you would ride with to the finish were pretty established. Still lots of chasing groups ahead but usually just a few riders, mostly shelled.

    After my 2nd stop I rode the second half of race solo for the most part. Occasionally getting into groups for short periods. I managed to ride almost the entire final climb which was washboard gravel that got progressively steeper and softer. Last 500m were 14-20% with 3" of cake mix. Stopped to let presure out before the final technical 4.4 mile MTB single track sector, 30 pis I'm guessing. That made a huge difference. Rocked that section but sadly my Garmin 530 had frozen about 2hrs earlier. Locked screen. I'm told Wahoo's are more reliable. Finished strong. Wasn't terribly dehydrated or under fueled so recovered pretty quickly. The guy that beat me is a long time competitor in my age group, he's usually faster. I suspect I would have been much closer with the brake failure and messed up hand.

    Overall, the course is fantastic. If you're not aiming for a high placing, I'd lay back at the start to avoid the dust and crashes. It's really dry so drink more than you think. A buff to block some of the dust in the first hour is probably a good idea. Assuming a similar course next year and if you aren't in a hurry, I'd start with lower pressures then crank them up after Aid #2 for the long road sections. Then drop back down for the final climb and single track. Aid stations usually have floor pumps. Bring chain lube, you'll need it at least once during the race. Don't underestimate that last climb. You won't run out of top end gear range anywhere on the course but you will definitely wish for lower gears on that climb. I'm Cat 1 and ran 46/34 x 11-40.
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  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emilio700 View Post
    Great writeup, thanks for spending the time to write it. Sorry to hear about the brake failure and crash. :-/

    Quote Originally Posted by Emilio700 View Post
    My rear brake failed on the first descent when I was in the top 40 riders or so. After that my left hand was throbbing so bad I thought I broke a finger. I run my rear brake on the left so every descent was ridden sorta one handed, left hand floating on top while dragging front brake to keep speed/ vibration down. I'm typically one of the fastest descenders but at BWR, I got passed by everybody.
    Glad to hear I'm not the only one that puts the rear on the left, or more important to me is having the front on the right.
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  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by davesupra View Post
    Glad to hear I'm not the only one that puts the rear on the left, or more important to me is having the front on the right.
    You must be from the U.K. That's the way bikes are set up there.
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    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
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  22. #47
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    Enjoyed the report, thanks. Lots to digest. Well done!

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    You must be from the U.K. That's the way bikes are set up there.
    Nope, I grew up racing motorcycles so the front brake (the most important one IMO) is always on the right to me. I didn't want to try to unlearn years of front/right braking when I started bicycling and it was easy to swap sides.
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  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by davesupra View Post
    Nope, I grew up racing motorcycles so the front brake (the most important one IMO) is always on the right to me. I didn't want to try to unlearn years of front/right braking when I started bicycling and it was easy to swap sides.
    Interesting. I did not know that motorcycles were set up that way.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

    "With
    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.





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