Gravel/Road/Crit bike
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  1. #1
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    Gravel/Road/Crit bike

    I'm currently looking to replace my current road bike with a road bike (disc) that can accomidate close to 40mm tires; if there are any suggestions out there please shout them out.

    Tricky part is I want whatever I go with to be able to be both comfortable for hours upon hours on gravel and (after some changes to the gearing/rubber) be able to hold it's own in a crit/road race. Open UP and 3T Exploro are the obvious answers but seriously pricy, Foundry Overland and Santa Cruz Stigmata have my interest right now too and are in the lead. They both look like a winners in my mind.. So if anyone has either of these and pushes them on and off the road I'm interested in hearing how you like them.

    I expect with disc brakes to continue to be pushed hard by bike manufacturers and there will be a lot more options that would fit this niche soon.. I'm a big guy 6'3'' so I'm not one that really sweats the fact my bike could be a pound or two heavier than the next guys. I've accepted the fact that I'll have to slam the stem on whatever frame I get as all the options apart from the 3T are pretty relaxed...

  2. #2
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    Have you looked at the Caad 12 ultegra disc? Good review from cyclingtips in the link below.

    https://cyclingtips.com/2017/01/cann...arison-review/

    edit: Sorry ,I missed the part on the 40c tires. looks like the Caad 12 max is 28-30c
    Last edited by bocksta; 01-31-2017 at 06:33 PM.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by wradom View Post
    I'm currently looking to replace my current road bike with a road bike (disc) that can accomidate close to 40mm tires; if there are any suggestions out there please shout them out.

    Tricky part is I want whatever I go with to be able to be both comfortable for hours upon hours on gravel and (after some changes to the gearing/rubber) be able to hold it's own in a crit/road race. Open UP and 3T Exploro are the obvious answers but seriously pricy, Foundry Overland and Santa Cruz Stigmata have my interest right now too and are in the lead. They both look like a winners in my mind.. So if anyone has either of these and pushes them on and off the road I'm interested in hearing how you like them.

    I expect with disc brakes to continue to be pushed hard by bike manufacturers and there will be a lot more options that would fit this niche soon.. I'm a big guy 6'3'' so I'm not one that really sweats the fact my bike could be a pound or two heavier than the next guys. I've accepted the fact that I'll have to slam the stem on whatever frame I get as all the options apart from the 3T are pretty relaxed...
    Gravel and crit riding are two fairly diametrically opposed need sets.

    I'd keep your road bike and get a dedicated gravel/off-road steed of which there are many. The Foundry bikes are nice, Foundry is a Salsa branding-and can be purchased locally at any QBP-supplied LBS in your area.


    Doing so would also open up your choices substantially.
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  4. #4
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    Gravel: Long wheel base, long chainstays, low bottom bracket, slack angles.

    Crit: Short wheelbase, short chainstays, high bottom bracket, sharp angles.
    use a torque wrench

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    Not sure you can get one bike to do everything, but disc brakes will let you go with 650B wheels which will let you go beyond stated spec on most road bikes. 700 wheels for faster riding, and 650B wide tires for gravel

    I have converted an old road frame over to 650B, and I can use 38's. With 700s 28s were the largest I could run

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bocksta View Post
    Have you looked at the Caad 12 ultegra disc? Good review from cyclingtips in the link below.

    https://cyclingtips.com/2017/01/cann...arison-review/

    edit: Sorry ,I missed the part on the 40c tires. looks like the Caad 12 max is 28-30c
    The caad 12 would be perfect with just a little more tire clearance, but then Cannondale would have a lot of trouble selling a slate..

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    Look into custom steel, or ti if you budget allows. You said you're a big guy so the extra pound or so shouldn't matter in exchange for being able to get exactly what you want for a decent price.

    It's true that gravel bikes and crit bikes are quite different. But really racing an aggressive (by gravel bike standards) gravel bike in a crit wouldn't be a problem per se. Less than idea but your speed will be all about the tires you put on it so you'd do fine. I've raced a few crits on my gravel bike. No big deal.
    The other way around, however, is less feasible. A crit bike could get to squirrely in soft gravel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Gravel and crit riding are two fairly diametrically opposed need sets.

    I'd keep your road bike and get a dedicated gravel/off-road steed of which there are many. The Foundry bikes are nice, Foundry is a Salsa branding-and can be purchased locally at any QBP-supplied LBS in your area.


    Doing so would also open up your choices substantially.
    I guess I would lean much more towards road races than to crits (they are just more frequent).. It would open up my choices but I don't really have the budget to spring for a road bike that would only get used 5-10 times per year..

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    Gravel: Long wheel base, long chainstays, low bottom bracket, slack angles.

    Crit: Short wheelbase, short chainstays, high bottom bracket, sharp angles.
    Yeah, very different requirements. The mega-buck (and bizarre to me) 3T Exploro might work as it's racy but has large tire clearance. I'd recommend getting an inexpensive crit racer and an inexpensive gravel bike. Both of these disciplines are crash-prone and you don't want to ride something you can't afford to trash.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiro11 View Post
    Yeah, very different requirements. The mega-buck (and bizarre to me) 3T Exploro might work as it's racy but has large tire clearance. I'd recommend getting an inexpensive crit racer and an inexpensive gravel bike. Both of these disciplines are crash-prone and you don't want to ride something you can't afford to trash.
    Two bikes is a good idea because changing tires and gearing all the time would be a pain......but I'm going to suggest that this business of different angles ect, while true, is being way overstatated. One could do just fine road racing and gravel riding the same frame.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    Two bikes is a good idea because changing tires and gearing all the time would be a pain......but I'm going to suggest that this business of different angles ect, while true, is being way overstatated. One could do just fine road racing and gravel riding the same frame.
    I'll be honest, I almost exclusively ride road/pavement and that won't change drastically with a new bike so there wouldn't be a great deal of hassle in changing gearing/tires around often. Leaning towards the Santa Cruz Stigmata as it is on par in terms of price of the Foundry and potentially just as light as my current road bike.
    Ideally Trek comes out with a new domane with crazy clearance on it and I can just pick that up...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wradom View Post
    The caad 12 would be perfect with just a little more tire clearance, but then Cannondale would have a lot of trouble selling a slate..
    The Slate is more like a Synapse with 650B fat tires and a shock fork.
    They do anything just to win a salami in ridiculous races. I take my gear out of the car and put my bike together. Tourists and locals are watching from sidewalk cafes. Non-racers. The emptiness of those lives shocks me. It was the illest of times, it was the dopest of times. And we looked damn good. Actually the autobus broke down somewhere on the Mortirolo.

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    Trek Domane SL or SLR models or Trek Boone once they release the new model later this year with the front Isospeed?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chader09 View Post
    Trek Domane SL or SLR models?
    They would be absolutely perfect with just a little more clearance. Last I heard they really only fit up to 28mm tires.

  15. #15
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    Have you looked at the Jamis Renegade:

    renegadeseries
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

    “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital.” -- Aaron Levenstein



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lombard View Post
    Have you looked at the Jamis Renegade:

    renegadeseries
    That is pretty close to what I'm looking for, Stigmatas geometry looks slightly better for racing on the road. Thanks for bringing it in I'll look at it more for sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wradom View Post
    They would be absolutely perfect with just a little more clearance. Last I heard they really only fit up to 28mm tires.
    I have a friend who just got the SLR 6 Disc and it came stock with 32 road slick. It should fit a 33 CX tire with decent room. I'd suggest looking at one in person if you get a chance.
    Domane SLR 6 Disc | Trek Bikes

    Also, not the best name, but the new DB Haanjo looks sweet.
    Diamondback Bicycles - Bikes - Road - Alternative Road - Haanjo - Haanjo Trail Carbon

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by wradom View Post
    That is pretty close to what I'm looking for, Stigmatas geometry looks slightly better for racing on the road. Thanks for bringing it in I'll look at it more for sure.
    If you are looking for a more aggressive geometry, you may want to look at some cyclocross bikes. Though I don't know if any of those can fit 40c tires.
    "With bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."-- DCGriz, RBR.

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  19. #19
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    I can't commit on which frame is the best all a rounder, but I sold my road bike a year and half ago and have been riding my Specialized Crux w/disc for everything and it's a great do it all bike (gravel, road (endurance and racing), and cx). I bought a nice set of wheels for the road (ENVE 5.6s) and with those, I have no problem hanging with the fast guys. Its not the ideal geometry for serious road riding or racing crits but I do both no problem and the bike is super comfortable on long distance road rides.

    Point is, save some of your budget for a nice set of aero wheels and you'll be very happy you did when riding and racing on the road. Nice wheels will make a much bigger difference on the road than a cm difference in geometry.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by wradom View Post
    I guess I would lean much more towards road races than to crits (they are just more frequent).. It would open up my choices but I don't really have the budget to spring for a road bike that would only get used 5-10 times per year..
    Since you're set on a do-it-all bike....Consider Rodeo Labs Flaanimal (in steel or Ti)

    Flaanimal 3.0 Adventure Bike. specification preview - Rodeo Adventure Labs, LLCRodeo Adventure Labs, LLC


    I'm lining up to build one this spring for a non-paved surface bike. It is the only real many-role frameset on the market, the adjustable dropouts will come in handy for you in allowing you to shallow or deepen the wheelbase, depending on surface.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc View Post
    Since you're set on a do-it-all bike....Consider Rodeo Labs Flaanimal (in steel or Ti)

    Flaanimal 3.0 Adventure Bike. specification preview - Rodeo Adventure Labs, LLCRodeo Adventure Labs, LLC


    I'm lining up to build one this spring for a non-paved surface bike. It is the only real many-role frameset on the market, the adjustable dropouts will come in handy for you in allowing you to shallow or deepen the wheelbase, depending on surface.
    That's a really cool option. Hadn't heard of it before, I'll dig into it a little.
    After reading way too many geometries and tire clearance claims, I've effectively narrowed my list down to four.
    In no particular order right now:

    Santa Cruz Stigmata (the most relaxed of the bunch, similar geo to what I ride right now)

    Specialized Crux (the boring option, set up with road gearing would definitely do the trick) General question on this frame, how can it have the same bb drop as the tarmac but a different bb height????? Are they just fibbing a bit using the tire size?

    Scott Addict Gravel (looks like the best option right now, geo is bang on)

    Foundry Overland (more of a want, definitely the heaviest of the bunch to the point it could be a drag in a hilly road race)

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by wradom View Post
    General question on this frame, how can it have the same bb drop as the tarmac but a different bb height????? Are they just fibbing a bit using the tire size?
    Bottom bracket drop is a frame measurement.

    Bottom bracket height, or stand over height, is a fully built bike with tires on it measurement.
    use a torque wrench

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    Bottom bracket drop is a frame measurement.

    Bottom bracket height, or stand over height, is a fully built bike with tires on it measurement.
    So with the same wheels/tires a tarmac and crux would have the same bb height then right?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by wradom View Post
    So with the same wheels/tires a tarmac and crux would have the same bb height then right?
    If the bottom bracket drop is the same, yes.

    And just for reference, the drop for a crit bike should really be no less than 68. Crit is usually about 65 to 68 or so. Road is usually around 68 to 72 or so, most commonly about 70. Some "endurance" and gravel and such bikes are about 72 to 75. Touring bikes will be the deepest at around 78 to 80 or so.

    The deeper the bottom bracket drop the less ability you have to pedal through turns. In exchange though you get a lower center of gravity and better stability, especially at high speed.
    use a torque wrench

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMsRepBike View Post
    If the bottom bracket drop is the same, yes.

    And just for reference, the drop for a crit bike should really be no less than 68. Crit is usually about 65 to 68 or so. Road is usually around 68 to 72 or so, most commonly about 70. Some "endurance" and gravel and such bikes are about 72 to 75. Touring bikes will be the deepest at around 78 to 80 or so.

    The deeper the bottom bracket drop the less ability you have to pedal through turns. In exchange though you get a lower center of gravity and better stability, especially at high speed.
    Thanks for the clear response. I'll be coming from an Bianchi Infinito (bb drop of 68) which is hardly a super aggressive racer (it is no slouch). Both the crux and addict gravel have bb drops of 67 which sound dead on for what I'm looking for with their ability to fit wider rubber when I need it. The big thing I want to avoid is getting a frame that is as/less aggressive than the one I have now but not so aggressive that it doesn't feel planted at a 40+ mph decent on the road.

    If I'm honest the bianchi has never really felt at home in a crit but I have managed a few good results anyway.

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