A steel bike on a gravel road - Page 3
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  1. #51
    hit it
    Reputation: NUTT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikenerd View Post
    Y'all must buy your steel bikes at Walmart. Ever heard of Richard Sachs? Paul Sadoff? Mike Zancanato?
    Who are those guys? Steel isn't a valid form of bike manufacturing these days.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty2Hotty View Post
    But I'm not a douche. I'm awesome.

  2. #52
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    My Salsa Casseroll likes gravel and mud,

  3. #53
    eminence grease
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bremerradkurier View Post
    In the words of R. Lee Ermey from "Full Metal Jacket" , choke yourself:

    He's getting paid to improperly use that bike.
    You'd be better off with a netbook, they do everything better.

    My travel blog: http://tbaroundtheworld.blogspot.com

  4. #54
    Cheese is my copilot
    Reputation: wooglin's Avatar
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    I never ride my pretty steel bike on gravel. I don't want to ding the paint.
    Life is better in the big ring.

    http://theclemencyblog.blogspot.com/

  5. #55
    Cheese is my copilot
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    And now that I think of it, didn't Grant Petersen just publish a book?
    Life is better in the big ring.

    http://theclemencyblog.blogspot.com/

  6. #56
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    My old 80's Fisher was full rigid steel. Took me all over nasty Colorado roads and single track with nary a care. Loved it. Super stable.

    It wasn't so much the bike itself as the unfamiliar truck road + me being fairly new to the sport at the time. That was my first mtb and I rode it for about a decade before finally getting front suspension. It was also my messenger bike, commuter, long-distance hauler, grocery-getter, and the first and only road century. 'course it had different tires along the way.

    John eventually gave it away to his co-worker and I've been heartbroken ever since, but it could've fit better. I miss having a bike I can ride around the city w/o worrying about it (or components) getting stolen.

  7. #57
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    I'm afraid I have to agree. I have yet to find a bicycling magazine that doesn't insult the intelligence of a canary. Road biking magazines where every single test ends with "This is the greatest bike I've ever ridden" or words to that effect. MTB magazines with pictures of people turning 360 degree flips over 200 ft drops. Touring magazines that only have free tours of the Mongolian desert.

    Absolutely NOTHING that talks about bicycles in a sane manner or uses of a bike that 99.99999% of the users would use it for. Bike messengers in San Francisco with a single speed and no brakes? Rowing across the Atlantic in a boat what has a bicycle attached to a propeller? Talking about how great a road bike is that weighs 12 lbs ready to ride? My friend weighs 180 lbs and isn't the world's most powerful rider and he breaks a set of Kyseriums every single year. And those aren't even super-light.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    I'm afraid I have to agree. I have yet to find a bicycling magazine that doesn't insult the intelligence of a canary. Road biking magazines where every single test ends with "This is the greatest bike I've ever ridden" or words to that effect. MTB magazines with pictures of people turning 360 degree flips over 200 ft drops. Touring magazines that only have free tours of the Mongolian desert.

    Absolutely NOTHING that talks about bicycles in a sane manner or uses of a bike that 99.99999% of the users would use it for. Bike messengers in San Francisco with a single speed and no brakes? Rowing across the Atlantic in a boat what has a bicycle attached to a propeller? Talking about how great a road bike is that weighs 12 lbs ready to ride? My friend weighs 180 lbs and isn't the world's most powerful rider and he breaks a set of Kyseriums every single year. And those aren't even super-light.
    why does he keep riding them? I broke one K, had it repaired and sold the set
    Have him get some custom built wheels 32 spoke 3x rear, 2x front.
    one nation, under surveillance with liberty and justice for few

    still not figgering on biggering

  9. #59
    feelin' Freddie Mercury
    Reputation: SystemShock's Avatar
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    Ze dredge, it is strong with this thread.
    Monkhouse: I want to go like my Dad did peacefully, in his sleep, not screaming in terror like his passengers.

    System: Fake news?? Trump's a Fake President, for God's sake.

    Plat: I'd rather fellate a syphilitic goat than own a Cervelo.

    Homer: I believe that children are our future. Unless we stop them now.

    Seam: Saw Bjork poop onstage back in the day. It blew my teenage mind


  10. #60
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    Well, he finally had one breakdown too many and went to the Campy wheels I recommended to him. Funny thing is that another friend who is FAR heavier has had his over a year now and they aren't making noises even on a pretty steep climb we did yesterday near Aquatic Park in San Francisco on our way to Marin.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by weltyed View Post
    fast, fun, and steel: choose two.
    I have a late model Lemond Zurich made with Reynolds 853 tubing and it is all three. And it steers MUCH better than most bikes as well. Making nearly dead stop uturns doesn't make you think you're falling over like my steel Pinarellos (and most Italian bikes) did.

    If you get a steel Mercian you discover an entirely new kind of handling. I couldn't say what it is about Mercians that make them feel so good but do they ever. They are not particularly light but while you don't get as tired riding a light bike all day long on big climbs you still can complete a ride. And anywhere else the handling of the Mercian shines.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by NUTT View Post
    Who are those guys? Steel isn't a valid form of bike manufacturing these days.
    Then you're not a strong rider. If you're riding the Big Tours it makes a difference. If you're a sports/recreational rider if 2-4 lbs makes any difference other than absolute climbing speed you're a sissy. While carbon fiber is stronger than other materials for its weight, too often that is used to make unreasonably light parts so that they can say theirs are the lightest. If there is one thing you DO NOT want to break it is a frame while descending a rough road at 40 mph.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by asciibaron View Post
    you should have been alive in the 70's. the suffering was the stuff of legend. steel EVERYTHING.

    *wink*
    My Colnago CLX 3.0 weighs in at 19.5 lbs without the seat pack and water bottle. My 1991 Basso Loto steel bike weighs in at 22.5. Can you explain why that would make a difference with your riding pleasure? I ALWAYS have to worry that some carbon fiber part has been over-torgued and may fail. I NEVER have to worry about my steel and aluminum bikes.

    While carbon fiber has a higher ultimate strength PER WEIGHT, they are often built too light. And steel or aluminum fails in slow phases whereas carbon fiber almost always fails catastrophically.

    Furthermore, carbon fiber age-degenerates by hardening and/or cracking of the resin whereas steel is real.
    Last edited by Tom Kunich; 2 Weeks Ago at 12:45 PM.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    I have ridden a steel mtb down a long, steep, gravelly truck road(?), back in the day. That was terrifying.
    Are you unfairly comparing the old unsuspended steel mountain bikes with the modern full suspension bikes? The suspension forks alone on the first steel mountain bikes were about 1/10th as effective as today's forks. This is why you see steel hardtails so popular. They work and they're cheap.

  15. #65
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    Aluminum fails can catastrophically fail, sometimes. Maybe not as common as carbon, but to say it doesn't is CRAZY!
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