2000 tuscany litespeed
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  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    2000 tuscany litespeed

    three questions-

    what price range is "good" or "normal" for a 2000 tuscany litespeed?

    what am i getting into by buying a bike that old? my guess is that the titanium frame is my lasting investment and everything else may or may not need to be replaced over the next few years? is that right? if so, how good of an investment is an 8 year old ti frame?

    while i know this bike was awesome when it came out (in 2000) and supposedly ti lasts forever, i am still wondering how it compares to lower end bikes today... ?

    any answers?

  2. #2
    Juanmoretime
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    What condition is it in? What components are on them and how many miles? Original components could be anywhere from pretty new to relative worn out. Any crash damage? Too many variables to give you a fair answer.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  3. #3
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    apparently great condition. components: dura ace ... with OP wheels. the owner says it has only been ridden 3 yrs, but i'm trying to get her to explain how much/hard it was ridden ... from her description there is no crash damage ...

    the bike is 2 1/2 hrs drive away from me, but sounds like a worthwhile drive ... maybe?

    does that narrow things down enough for you to give me a ball park answer?

  4. #4
    Juanmoretime
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    I'm guessing 9 speed components which parts are getting harder to find. If it was absolutley flawless with less then 10,000 miles on it I might pay as high as $1,200 but would look at $1,000 as an offer.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  5. #5
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    Thank you!

    I'll let you know what happens ... hopefully I'll have a picture to show!

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    I have been in the market for a used Litespeed for a long time now. From my own research the bike you describe is probably worth $1000. If it is worn or needs new components maybe $800. If it has recently been overhauled with new parts then $1200 or more depending.

    I will say this: I have been looking for a long time now and it is difficult to find used Litespeeds that are my size with the setup I want, so consider the rarity of them in your offer price.

  7. #7
    Squirrel Hunter
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    Miles and Miles

    Quote Originally Posted by jevagirl
    apparently great condition. components: dura ace ... with OP wheels. the owner says it has only been ridden 3 yrs, but i'm trying to get her to explain how much/hard it was ridden ... from her description there is no crash damage ...

    the bike is 2 1/2 hrs drive away from me, but sounds like a worthwhile drive ... maybe?

    does that narrow things down enough for you to give me a ball park answer?
    My wife has a 2000 Tuscany. From what you describe the $1,000 to $1,200 price range sounds reasonable at least while peering at it from the internet. My wife probably has close to 30k miles on her Litespeed and it is still going strong. She recently switched out her components, changing brands but that really had nothing to do with the frame and the original components still have a couple of seasons left in them.

    Drive on down there with cash in hand, your helmet, shorts, shoes and pedals if necessary. Have the measurement for your current saddle height so you can move the seat to the proper level for your test ride. Take a test ride thinking not only bike condition but Fit, Fit Fit. Have a rag, ruler and flashlight for inspection. After your ride and inspection decide if you like the "bike" overall and the fit of the frame. If so then make an offer or pay the requested price and enjoy your new ride. No need to quible over little stuff like a worn saddle that you plan to replace anyways.

    Barring a horrific crash, the frame itself should have many years of enjoyment left in it. In fact, unlike an automobile, the number of miles on a bike really do not matter all that much. Rather it is the original build and care taken with the bike. Really the only wear type items on the bike you are looking at are the components. Dura Ace are top of the line and 9 speed is plenty for most riders. Open Pro wheels if well built will last a long time and at the most you may need to have them trued. The stickers on my wifes bike have some "cracks" in them and some wear from her knee rubbing the top tube, purely cosmetic and the Ti frame itself is in great shape.

    I would check the following:
    Quick Releases, Hoods, Pedals, RD and Saddle- these are the contact points that get scratched up in a crash. People will replace a saddle, rubber hood or handlebar tape but rarely will replace Q/R or pedals. They may have some scratches from plain old riding and use but if there are deep scars from pavement surfing this will tell you if the bike has been crashed. If there are scratches on the rear derailer (RD) carefully look at the hanger and make sure it is not bent.

    Wheels - give them both a spin and check to see they are true. It the bike has been sitting a while I would put new rim tape and tubes in both wheels and depending on condition consider new tires.

    Mileage - a couple of things you can do to check mileage are those areas where novices (ridden 3 out of 8 years) skip on maintenance. Check the front brake pads and compare the wear to the rear brake pads. If they front brakes are approaching the limit lines this may indicate more than 3 years riding by a novice rider. Also bring a metal ruler and check the stretch on the chain. After three years you should be seeing some stretch and if there is none then it may mean it has been replaced because of high mileage. Finally look at the chainrings and see if they have a nice "U" shape or if they are hooked like shark fins from excessive wear.

    Shifters - test ride and make sure the levers have a nice smooth action and distinct shifts. Don't get too excited if the shift on the cogs is noisy, focus your attention on the "feel" of the shifter action. Noisy shifting can indicate a few things that are normal... poor adjustment which is an easy fix, worn cogs (especially the DA Ti cogs) which may need replaced as this is a normal wear item on a bike, stretched chain which after three years of riding may be ready for replacement anyways, old cable housing which is also a maintenance item that should be replaced from time to time. The only bad thing to worry about with poor shifting is if the bike has been crashed and the RD hanger is bent.

    Frame - check all the weld areas where tubes are joined. Look for any cracks. Take a rag and if viewing at night a good flashlight. Turn the bike upside down and check around the bottom bracket. Take the rear wheel out and check inside the dropouts and near the bottom bracket where the chainstays join.

    Extra cost:
    Some low cost items to plan on buying initially would be handlebar tape, rim tape, tubes, tires and bottle cages. This will make the bike feel new and personalized to you in addtion to be cheap upgrades/replacements.

    Maintenance items that may need replaced depending on wear and age include chain, cogs, cables and housing, headset. A good mechanic without an incentive to sell you a bunch of stuff can help you evaulaute what needs replaced and what needs adjusted.

    You may want to change saddles or simply move your current saddle to your new bike. Same with pedals. Handlebars may not be the right width for you so you may want to change these.
    Luck is the intersection of preparation and opportunity.

  8. #8
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    during the time I took to mull over the bike, it sold. having become increasingly convinced of the sweetness of this potential deal, i was pretty disappointed. but, i'm new to the road bike world and i am convinced that i can't afford to rush into buying a used bike without lots of research/understanding what i'm getting.

    as i still intend to buy used, and hopefully a litespeed, your advice remains pertinent and helpful. thank you guys!

  9. #9
    Squirrel Hunter
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    Size?

    Quote Originally Posted by jevagirl
    ...as i still intend to buy used, and hopefully a litespeed...
    What size? I know someone who has (had?) a 47cm Tuscany for sale.
    Luck is the intersection of preparation and opportunity.

  10. #10
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    49cm would be ideal, i think. a 47 might work just as well but i'd want to try one before buying. my inseam is 74cm, long-ish torso though so my height is 5'4.5 ...

  11. #11
    Squirrel Hunter
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    Sold

    Quote Originally Posted by jevagirl
    49cm would be ideal, i think. a 47 might work just as well but i'd want to try one before buying. my inseam is 74cm, long-ish torso though so my height is 5'4.5 ...
    Just called my buddy and he has sold his wifes old Litespeed. As I recall it was around a $1,000 with Ultegra and similar use to the one you described but definitely well maintained.
    Luck is the intersection of preparation and opportunity.

  12. #12
    haole from the mainland
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    Quote Originally Posted by jevagirl
    49cm would be ideal, i think. a 47 might work just as well but i'd want to try one before buying. my inseam is 74cm, long-ish torso though so my height is 5'4.5 ...
    I'm the same height, although with a bit more leg than torso (31"/78.5cm inseam) but with longish arms, and I ride a 49cm Merlin. If your torso is longish, a 47cm is probably too small.

  13. #13
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    now i digress ... in terms of topic and selection:

    topic, because i'm hoping it won't be too "leech-like" if i ask you about another bike option facing me- one that is not a litespeed or even titanium

    this is my first real road bike, right, and so due to some tempering influences from my better half i'm trying to keep it as inexpensive but still value-ridden as possible. so i'm choosing the taboo buying method of craigslist. basically i moved to slowly on the litespeed, which was a deal better than i was informed to recognize. BUT i have another option... $550 on a cannondale r600. so this is a 2001 bike with these upgrades: Shimano Ultegra rear der. Shimano Dura Ace front der. 105 shifter / brake leavers. Cane Creek Brakes. Mavic wheels, Gomitalia tires with low miles. which sounds like a decent frame (aluminum alloy with carbon fork) and great components the price. and, yes, this is actually a size i have tested and know fits though i'll try the bike before buying.

    my qstns: is this a good buy if it's in good condition? should i try to hold out longer for an amazing titanium deal to come along? do you have any thoughts/words that would be helpful for me even though i'm too ignorant to ask the right qstn?

    sorry all i have to contribute is questions ... hope it isn't rude. and thank you!

  14. #14
    Juanmoretime
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    Not bad for a starter bike. It will work until you decide that the road bike is for you and you can save to go higher. Do you want to ride now or later? Offer less and see if the bite. The economy sucks so its a buyers market.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  15. #15
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    do you think that if i wait i might find another ti bike, my fit, with decent components under $1000 in the near future?

  16. #16
    Squirrel Hunter
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    Long Wait

    Quote Originally Posted by jevagirl
    do you think that if i wait i might find another ti bike, my fit, with decent components under $1000 in the near future?
    It may very well be a long wait to get a good, used, cheap Ti bike in your size. Get something you can start riding now and start dialing in your preferences with regard to geometry and components.

    While Ti bikes are nice, do to their cost they are generally lifetime bikes purchased by folks that have a good idea what they want (size as well as top tube length, geometry, wheel size...). Remember too that components can easily be moved from bike to bike so if you later find a Ti frame you can move parts over or buy new stuff.
    Luck is the intersection of preparation and opportunity.

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