Alright Lownje Landscapers stupid question inside!
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  1. #1
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    Alright Lownje Landscapers stupid question inside!

    I'm building a 10' x 12' foot garden shed. I'm trying to decide between using 16' x 16' pavers versus digging out a 12' x 14' area and using gravel for a base. The pavers would be easiest for me, just level the ground, put down some fabric and level the stones.

    The gravel will require a truck dropping off a couple of yards and me leveling it myself and using landscape timbers for a border.

    The shed will probably be built on 3 runners in case I ever want to move it. I could probably just plop that right on the grass, but I don't want to.

    Upside to pavers it that it's easier for me. Easier to remove and plant grass in the future if needed. Downsides are cracking over time and unevenness of the stones although I am putting a floor in the shed.

    Upside to gravel is that it may be more stable of a base over time?

    Ideally I'd like to just put pavers down and then build the shed on top of that. As I said the shed will have a solid floor and runners.

    Thoughts?
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  2. #2
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    Just thought....

    You can use Concrete Pier Blocks with Metal Bracket https://www.homedepot.com/p/Concrete...3112/202820094

    or

    11-1/2 in. x 8 in. x 11-1/2 in. Concrete Block https://www.homedepot.com/p/11-1-2-i...-100350712-_-N

    Lay down a weed block liner, frame out s Sub-floor... leveling the floor using 4x4 post. that way you can have it moved in the future.
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  3. #3
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    Pressure treated lumber would make a better base.
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  4. #4
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    I would use treated (for ground contact) 4x4 or 4x6 for the runners. Maybe even treated lumber for the shed floor.

    I don't see much benefit in either the gravel or the pavers. At most, I would use some solid concrete blocks (4x8x16) to set the runners on. Space them maybe every 3-4 foot underneath the runners and call it good enough.

  5. #5
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    I am building a skateboard ramp. We have 8 inch x 4 inch concrete blocks as the feet for the ramp. We dug holes just big enough for the blocks, and put in gravel and then sand, and then the block. The 4 inch deep blocks are about 2 inches into the ground.

    We used a level to make sure the block was level, and a string level to make sure all blocks at same level.

    Our design has 2x4s. I painted them with primer to be somewhat weather resistant. We will see how it does. For the shed, it might work to have treated 4x4. You may not be able to find 12 foot, but maybe 10 foot. If only 8 foot is available, I might shift the plan to be 8 foot by 15 foot. And then maybe have concrete blocks every 4 feet or so.

    Concrete blocks were not very expensive at big box hardware store. It was hard to get the 8 in the truck. They are kind of heavy.

  6. #6
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    I was thinking gravel because I can keep the shed closer to the ground to drive the mower etc. in and out with less sinking in the ground over time. Also it would maybe discourage critters from setting up residence underneath it methinks. I also have to level the ground, it is on a slight slope of about 6 inches over 14 feet along the edge of the property where it will sit. I would use some landscape timbers as a border and fill it in with gravel and lay down some fabric and then compact it. I will use treated 4 x 4's for the skids.
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  7. #7
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    Don't ask a bunch of landscapers how to build a bldg, just say'in.
    Do you live in a community or out of town? They may have regulations. Normally you can't build up against your property line, maybe that is why you think skids would circumvent the authorities?
    Do you live somewhere where one may experience high winds or tornadoes? You'll probably want to anchor your structure to the ground.
    If your putting a floor in it, why are you worried about what is under that? You'll want to enclose the space to minimize rodents/etc, but whether it's dirt/grass/pavers/gravel under the floor really isn't going to matter much. What ever touches the ground will need to be either treated/rated for earth or metal.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    Don't ask a bunch of landscapers how to build a bldg, just say'in. Note: I didn't ask how to build the building ;)

    Do you live in a community or out of town? They may have regulations. Normally you can't build up against your property line, maybe that is why you think skids would circumvent the authorities? I am 3 feet off the property line and out of town per local regs.

    Do you live somewhere where one may experience high winds or tornadoes? You'll probably want to anchor your structure to the ground. Probably not an issue where it will be placed.

    If your putting a floor in it, why are you worried about what is under that? You'll want to enclose the space to minimize rodents/etc, but whether it's dirt/grass/pavers/gravel under the floor really isn't going to matter much. What ever touches the ground will need to be either treated/rated for earth or metal. I don't want critters or weeds popping up underneath. Even though it will be on slids I want it level and solid underneath so it won't sink in or become uneven. I'm picky that way.
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  9. #9
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    OK, you're not bldg a bldg, I get it. knod, knod, wink, wink. It's a mobile umbrella for your tractor.
    .... and their called skids, not slids, where is CX?
    Well if you live in wisconson, they have winter there. ...so if you don't have a foundation to about 4 or 5 ft below grade, that a... umbrella ... is going to be moving every year.
    Last edited by duriel; 06-29-2020 at 05:51 PM.
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  10. #10
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    Spelling error, I truly apologize, it's skids! As for the moving, it will be in a place where a cheap Rubbermaid shed did not move for many years, hopefully 1,400 lbs will stay put better than a couple hundred. Again, I did not ask how to build the "building", but more of how to prep the ground underneath. Did I not make that clear the second time around? Sorry.
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  11. #11
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    ... so that rubbermaid shed was 14' long? ... and your shed is going to be really flexible, right?

    I'm just trying to help, really!
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    Also it would maybe discourage critters from setting up residence underneath it methinks.
    Sorry.....it doesn't work that way. I need to set traps in my yard again, Ground hogs don't care about gravel, neither do chipmunks.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

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  13. #13
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    I put mine on cinder blocks. Kind of like the Concrete Pier Blocks with Metal Bracket https://www.homedepot.com/p/Concrete...3112/202820094. I would have done that 20 years ago when I built mine.

    If you are in an area where it snows, get the shed off the ground. Build a small ramp if needed, but keep it off the ground.

    critters underneath... old fashion moth balls will get rid of skunks. In one night they went from under my shed to under the neighbors porch... Win!

    I built an additional 8'x8' playhouse for the kid. Vented it well, and insulated the side walls. It stays amazingly cool during a hot day. At some point if I ever close in the walls in the shed, it will be insulated just to keep the temps down. I hate walking into a hot shed.

    and last of all.... lawn mower?.... hire a professional and go ride.
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  14. #14
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    I made a patio about 18 years ago.

    Strip up the sod, dig down a bit if needed. Layer of rock. It was like gravel, but had something in it to bond (maybe just mixed lightly with concrete ?) I bought bags of that and dumped. I did not have a machine to level, just duct taped two 2x6x3' boards to my feet and stomped around to flatten. (what? this is the lounge, so I can admit that here) And it was wonderfully flat. Water and let set. Paver sand down, pavers on top.

    No noticable heaves or sags. It was sloped a bit and over time, the pavers have spread out a little. But I would trust it again if I wanted to put a shed in the back. I would at least put down that paver gravel, packed down well, at all the shed supports.

    At the time, it was "broom sand into the cracks". It was ok. We just pressure washed to clean. Now they have a paver lock sand (just mixed with some concrete) that you broom over and then lightly sprinkle and it really locks on place. Wish I had that originally.

  15. #15
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    I ended up spending 2 hours last night in the miserable heat and humidity moving the Invisible fence just past the back of the shed spot so the dogs could go in if they wanted to. You'd think 4 big dogs would keep pests away, but I swear to god my youngest shepherd plays with the rabbits while they eat my plants. I've been getting almost one rabbit a day with the .22 air rifle before work.




    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    Sorry.....it doesn't work that way. I need to set traps in my yard again, Ground hogs don't care about gravel, neither do chipmunks.
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  16. #16
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    I think a concrete pad is ideal. I built a box with treated lumber and filled it with stones and gravel. There was definitely a leveling issue. It sits on treated 4x4 boards and the floor is treated lumber. Been good for at least a decade. I do think it's important to make sure water doesn't pool up under the floor. Treated wood these days ain't what it used to be.
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  17. #17
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    I just built a garden shed last summer. I wanted to build it on a slab, but that makes it a 'permanent' structure and I'd have to observe setbacks, survey, get a permit, etc. As long as it's on runners it's 'temporary' and can go anywhere. I couldn't find the pins for my property corners and didn't want to pay for a survey for a little garden shed so mine has a wood floor and base. It's definitely worthwhile to check on the building permit requirements for your area.

    I built a gravel pad for mine and set block into the gravel to reduce ground pressure. Our soil is all fat, wet, clay and the reason I had to build a shed in the first place is the old one was slowly sinking into the ground. I had to cut a little bit off the doors every spring the last few years so I could get them open. I added dirt so the new shed is up higher and hopefully the gravel will drain better so it's not in a swamp.

    Thankfully no critters yet, surprisingly. My dogs are as effective a deterrent as yours. They definitely feast upon my garden but so far haven't completely moved in.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmoose View Post
    I did not have a machine to level, just duct taped two 2x6x3' boards to my feet and stomped around to flatten.
    Video required or it didn't happen!

    Even if you build it on skids, having 4 or 6 pier foundations under the skids will stop all settling from freez'in & rain'in. Careful with the pellit gun, the rabbits may be better friends with your dogs than you! You all ready have them in prison.
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  19. #19
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    Almost done. 2 x 6 treated floor on 4 x 4 runners, on 6" of compacted gravel. Took more time than I thought, from clearing out the initial soil to adding the gravel to building it. It's overbuilt, at every seam in the siding I added another interior wall 2 x 4 to nail the panels to etc. Painting the seams in the siding is a chore, I still have to go over it and touch up every spot where I can see primer or bare wood yet. The pine siding sucks up a lot of primer.

    I have to put in 4 anchors in the corners, and do some cosmetic trim work and finish building a bench/storage unit inside. Also need to make a ramp for the double door and a step for the single door etc. The gravel around the base got kicked around in the process, I need to do some cosmetic work there yet. It's amazing how much light the solar LED's offer these days, I will be placing a solar panel on the roof for the interior lights. The wife is considering using it for herself now that she helped work on it. I've been meaning to build a work area in the garage and heating it also.
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  20. #20
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    Looks great!

    This was supposed to be my summer project as well, but I've ended up picking away at a bunch of half-finished projects inside.

    Maybe this fall, I can get on the project!
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    Almost done. 2 x 6 treated floor on 4 x 4 runners, on 6" of compacted gravel. Took more time than I thought, from clearing out the initial soil to adding the gravel to building it. It's overbuilt, at every seam in the siding I added another interior wall 2 x 4 to nail the panels to etc. Painting the seams in the siding is a chore, I still have to go over it and touch up every spot where I can see primer or bare wood yet. The pine siding sucks up a lot of primer.

    I have to put in 4 anchors in the corners, and do some cosmetic trim work and finish building a bench/storage unit inside. Also need to make a ramp for the double door and a step for the single door etc. The gravel around the base got kicked around in the process, I need to do some cosmetic work there yet. It's amazing how much light the solar LED's offer these days, I will be placing a solar panel on the roof for the interior lights. The wife is considering using it for herself now that she helped work on it. I've been meaning to build a work area in the garage and heating it also.
    sorry about being so slow, but IT LOOK GREAT!, apparently summer is winding down, mid 40's tomorrow night from what I heard, I am in denial!!!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

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  22. #22
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    NOW HERE ARE SOME SMART KIDS!!!!

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-54193770
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Touch0Gray View Post
    sorry about being so slow, but IT LOOK GREAT!, apparently summer is winding down, mid 40's tomorrow night from what I heard, I am in denial!!!
    Yea, but the bug-free days in Sept. are worth it. I can't wait until the corn is in, even on a bike those intersections that I can easily see to roll through I can't because of the tall corn.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    Yea, but the bug-free days in Sept. are worth it. I can't wait until the corn is in, even on a bike those intersections that I can easily see to roll through I can't because of the tall corn.
    and some of that corn is/was 10 feet tall this year. They are taking it off FAST here!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

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