anyone understand cricket?
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  1. #1
    funct
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    anyone understand cricket?

    how can England be 178-0 and still be 15 runs behind?
    and how bout Pakistan at 3 for -3?

  2. #2
    classiquesklassieker
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    Shouldn't this be on cricketbatreview.com?

    nmnmnmnmnmnmnmnmnm

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Cricket rules

    I believe that I can quote from a T-shirt I saw in an English souvenier stand: "cricket is a game in which all the players from one team start out, and all the players from the other team start in. When everyone who was out is in, and everyone who was in is out, then the game is over." Simple enough, eh?

  4. #4
    foz
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    too much to explain here....

    try this:

    http://www.cs.purdue.edu/homes/hoski...xplanation.htm

    five day tests are the best, because they allow loads of drinking time (for the spectators... ) they?re also the most confusing for some people because those that don?t know the game don?t understand how two teams can play for 5 days, have different scores, yet finish the match with a draw....

    foz

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by thefunkyplumber
    how can England be 178-0 and still be 15 runs behind?
    and how bout Pakistan at 3 for -3?
    It depends on what kind of match you are watching. In a test match, usually either three or five days, each side gets one or two complete innings to bat, where every man gets to bat. In a limited overs match, each side gets a limited number of pitches and their inning ends either when the number of pitches is over or when the entire order is out.

    For the example above, 178-0 means that the first two batters scored 178 runs and no one is out. However, if they are 15 runs behind, if the match was a 50 over match (6 bowls (pitches) to an over) that means that after 300 pitches, while no one was out, they only managed to score 178 runs and the other team scored 15 more in the same number of balls.

  6. #6
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Cos its a test match. Each team plays two innings and the team with the greatest number of runs after that wins. England either batted second, in which case the other side scored more runs in their innings, or were playing their second innings, and hadn't yet scored more runs than the opposition. The number of wickets is almost irrelevant - only serves to limit the amount of time each team bats for.

    Simple, really.

  7. #7
    Shirtcocker
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    Quote Originally Posted by thefunkyplumber
    how can England be 178-0 and still be 15 runs behind?
    and how bout Pakistan at 3 for -3?
    No idea, but this movie has a cricket bat in it and it rocks!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

  8. #8
    angel of the morning
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    well .........

    Quote Originally Posted by thefunkyplumber
    how can England be 178-0 and still be 15 runs behind?
    well ... sounds like a 1 day game to me where each team has 1 batting innings whilst the other team have a limited amount of overs (1 over = 6 turns to bowl for each bowler at either end). The idea is to score eas many runs as possible and not have the whole team out before/short of the end of the innings. The above scenario posted makes me think England were the second team to bat (meaning they bowled and fielded first) and needed 15 runs to beat the first teams total for the same amount of balls bowled. That they have 0 men out with such a high score also tells me that the opposing team is not super hot at bowling but that they may still win the game for having contained the score of the opposing team (england) to lower than they had scored. If it's a draw the team with the least men out will win. This is for a 1 day game. Same game but there are big differences between 1 day matches and 5 day tests (some would say mostly in the levels of boredom). But if your into it, your into it.


    Quote Originally Posted by thefunkyplumber
    and how bout Pakistan at 3 for -3?
    That doesn't make sense as the later # is usually how many men are out (or wickets lost). To have a minus figure is impossible as the tally always starts from 0 meaning nobody is out yet. Maybe you misread it as 3 for 3 meaning 3 runs scored and 3 men out.

    Cricket is a very strange but beautiful sport that could only be an English invention (BTW which their former colonies now usually trounce them at ;) ). It's odd but if you play the game and learn all its little nuances it does start to make some sense and is enjoyable - watching has never been my cup of tea. Things I like about it is that all the players must wear long trousers, test matches (or 5 day games) each team must wear all white (grass stains, dirt marks and the bowlers rubbing the ball to give it a smooth shine leaves a leather dye residue on the groin area where it's usually done - are all very hard to wash), you play all day and only get to stop for tea, drinks and lunch, the batsman (of which there are always 2 out at any one time) stay at their respective ends of the wicket and at the end of each over (6 balls) the whole fielding team changes ends to accomodate the other side form which the new bowler bowls his over, it's OK (cool even) to hit the batsman when bowling - usually done to intimidate or put the batsman in doubt and wary - they dont get a free run or any points for being hit and just cop it (trust me the ball hurts and has killed), the sound of the bat hitting the ball is addictive - yet the sound of the ball hitting the batsman usually has everyone winceing and is a little sickening if you have felt it, only the wicket keeper (ie the catcher) wears gloves but the remaining fieldsman catch and stop the ball with their bare hands (if it's hit hard and you catch or stop the ball you know about it as your hand stings and pulses afterwards - it is harder than a baseball too), you have great words for types of balls bowled (deliveries) like googlie, leg break, wrong-un, off spin, seamer, bouncer, full toss, swing (like cruve ball, breaking ball, fast ball, etc etc), have great names for fielding positions which can be much varied but the following are designated to specific areas where a fielder may stand - gulley, silly mid-on or off, batpad, slips, third man, square leg, some of these fielders can be only a couple of yards (or less) from the batsman where they could be hit by a ball hit in excess of 130mph - so quick reflexes are needed to either catch the ball or do what you can to move quick so not to get hit (not as highly revered or in keeping with the game), the wicket (22 yard long batting/bowling strip) often takes great skill and time to prepare by a groundsman, its grass cut very short and rolled so it's very hard within the fews days beforew game and can be unpredictable and can be tailored to suit how the ball will bounce or react to suit the home team, starts out perfect and by the end of the game deteriorates and makes the ball bounce inconsistent and varying depending on the rough patches, the bats are always made of willow, the balls are a hard rubber core, encased in cork, wrapped in hard twine and then wrapped and stitched in thick hardened leather hide with a raised stitched seam (about 3 mm) that runs its diameter, the same ball is used for a limited amount of overs so it can vary if it's hit plenty and when it's time for the new ball the bolwing team can have quite an advantage as it's noticeable faster, the stumps which the batsmen protect the bolwers from hitting (when pitching - think of it like a vertical home plate that is a target if hit) are 3 long parallel wood sticks pushed into the ground with 2 "bails" (small sticks sitting on the top of the 3 long sticks) so that even a slight graze from the ball will have them topple and signify a wicket (meaning the batsman is out), you can tachinically hit the wicket but if it is so soft as to not topple the bails the batter is not out, from memory it measures 2'6"high x 8" wide in area on a direct view (impressive when you sometimes see a fielder hit the stumps from side on view and great distance - it's less than an inch wide). The bowler HAS to bowl (pitch) with a straight arm (meaning it cannot be thrown with elbow action) - to compensate for this the fast bowlers usually have a run up with some starting back from some 40-50 yards to gain the speed and momentum before hurling the ball 22 yards away from the batsman, Trust me - the sight of some big gnarly mo-fo running towards you with a very hard ball knowing that they can-will intend to hit you with can be very intense. The ball will travel about the same speed as the top baseball pitchers too but accuracy and predicatability of bounce (yes they usually bounce the ball before it reaches the batsmen so it's hard to read and may deviate it's course on cracks or uneven hard grass wickets) can vary greatly as a few of my x-rays show evidence of. You try hittin a ball that will bounce half way down the pitch and then sing past your ears as it rises and moves towards you at about 100mph. Again I should mention that if you get hit whilst batting you dont get free points or a walk or any runs, each batsman wears a "protector" which is a plasitc cup so it may deflect if they are hit in the groin area - at best it may save you so to be able to have children but it still hurts plenty, really hurts, I can't recall any batsman evading the ball bowled other than to duck or weave their head so not to get hit - you have to protect your wicket(stumps) getting hit, if by bat great, if by body then so be it, if injured you simply get "retired hurt" and there is only one reserve (called the twelth man - ie a team has only eleven men). The most famous match or series after the war was called "bodyline" where the english bowlers notably Larwood used it as a tactic against the then superioir Australian batsmen, in particular Bradman - nigh on almost every ball was bowled at the batter's heads or upper body - no helmets back then. It was viewed with some infamy but was within the rules of the game but some thought it not in keeping with the spirit of the game - hence the catchry "It's just not cricket". I think it is and is now a challenging part of the game and very much a tactic. There are no substituions or designated hitters as the whole team bats and fields each innings - the bowler can be King (but that's OK because he will also be required to bat when its his teams innings and often will be squared up with a few balls in repatriation) The game is played in former Colonies of the British empire (england, india, pakistan, sri lanka, south africa, zimbabwe, the west indies, australia, new zealand and a few more). My favorite team was the West Indies of the 80's as they had lotsa flair, were cocky and were exciting to watch. Sometimes you can be fielding/bowling for days trying to get the bastman out which if under a hot sun or cold weather can be quite tiresome, and in the same if you are a good batsman you may be batting for days and running up and down between the wicket to score points. A duck is a batsman getting a score of 0 and out for the first ball - a famous australian batsman used to wish himself "break a leg" so to speak by lighting a cigarette just before he went out to bat and leaving it with a team mate on the field perimeter fence saying "i'll be back in a minute". A bowler getting a maiden over is when he balls his over (6 balls) without any runs scored by the opposing team. Some decisions of whether a batsman is out must be appealed by the fielding team to the umpires (usually asking "how is that" or "howzat" at which point the umpire shall make a decision or may confer to the video umpire if it's too close to call) or the batsman may "walk" meaning in the show of good sportmanship will walk off the pitch knowing he was out (or lost his wicket) and not waiting for the bowling team to appeal or the umpire to make a decision. In a 5 day test match a batting team can declare, meaning they think they have scored sufficient runs (score) so to leave enough time to send the oppsing team into bat & try to get them out before the last day of play, similarly if a bowling team trounces the batting team for little runs they can send the team into bat again if they think they can do it again and remain confident of their initial batting score to be unreached ........... and it goes on and on and on an on ....... and I haven't even come close to or begun to explain the aim of the game and how it is scored and played. yes it's wacky.


    Cricket is a pretty complex and intricate sport and indeed takes a lot of explaining and has lots of rules with nuances. It is a good game and much like a game of chess comprising 22 men on a large oval field and sometimes for 5 days after which there may be no result (ie a draw). Like watching chess it can be mindnumbingly boring but in the same many love simply to watch it on tv or at the ground and lose themselves in the quiet game with odd flurries of activity - for that there is beer or Gin & Tonic or a hat to cover your eyes and have a snooze until somehting happens. It is a game of great skill and when played well very stylish. Me personally, i cant stand to watch it much other than some highlights even though I played at a high standard with more than a few who went on to international acclaim. For me it was something to do and enjoy and my fondest moments weren't of playing on fine fields and for club or school but of backyard or street games (like your stick ball) that wen't on for days or for half an hour between whoever wanted to join us. In common with stick ball, the sound of breaking glass usually means run for the hills and scatter quick. Having joined a few games of stick ball when living in NYC I did gain respect as my latino, italian & black neighbours and compatriots were a little wowed that "kangaroo" could hit, throw and catch a ball with quite some accuracy - in fact I hurled a ball for a $20 bet 50 yards at a no parking sign (10" x 14") and hit it right in the centre where the red circle with a cross struck through it sits - suffice to say "kid kangaroo" was then the first player picked when a game of stick ball was started "as he got mad skills, yo". I even chanced it by being a very short short-stop (3 yards) so to put the batter off a little (to much complaint). I didn't tell them we played baseball (and softball when younger) in the cricket off-season to keep our batting timing on and our arms and reflexes in shape. Lets just say when I tried to introduce a game of street cricket to them in NYC they either fell asleep or walked away confused.

    In all, cricket is beautiful but wierd and pretty complicated to explain and understand. But at least we play our "world series" against other nations and like George Orwell wrote about football (soccer as you know it) it is indeed "war without guns" and can be quite an enjoyable spectacle/battle at the highest level between the better nations. It's known as a ferocious game of style between gentlemen. It's still a cool game to play by the beach with a handful of friends too (until you start arguing about decisions or rules).

    ciao
    I watched him walking in and it was like they say, you know, he kind of glowed. Like a ray of light was around him. A kind of Jesus. - Spirito (interviewing Spirito)

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  9. #9
    AJS
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    I still don't get it (cricket), but I sure dig soccer!

  10. #10
    funct
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    ah spirito

    such an ode!
    tis indeed a game revered among men
    played by doughty folk with bat
    and ball and hat (for the sun)

    the old blight
    has risen from her slumber
    dared to raise her head above the trench
    she represents for the throne
    such, aussies shall not condone

    but bloody hell well done
    that was quite the second innings
    looks like they'll knock the boks
    that's how many on the trot?

    Though Pakistan have failed to awe
    Shoaib's antics aside
    I'll take my place in bay 19
    (between turns 3 and 4 in Major Taylor's day)
    and enjoy the whole damn scene

  11. #11
    angel of the morning
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    funlplumb

    now im sure the seppo's here are well confused

    me too - fair suck of the saveloy, whay'd'ask?

    funny though

    ciao
    I watched him walking in and it was like they say, you know, he kind of glowed. Like a ray of light was around him. A kind of Jesus. - Spirito (interviewing Spirito)

    http://instagram.com/ciclispirito



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