The benefits of country living.
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  1. #1
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    The benefits of country living.

    We live in rural southwest Wisconsin. The benefits include:

    4 seasons. Yes, some people like snow and cold, and the change in seasons.

    It's cheaper to live. Lower crime rate. Cleaner air.

    No neighbors within earshot. This can be good and bad, however being able to stand in the front yard to pee is so natural

    Trees and greenery, it is impossibly green here.

    Peace and quiet. I hate crowds and the city in general, you can have your museums and restaurants, I'll grow my own fresh veggies in the garden and not have to listen to the noise.

    The nearest city is 15 minutes away, some people commute a half hour or more despite living in the city, that must really suck.

    I can be on quiet low-traffic roads right out my door.
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  2. #2
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    Not to mention you'll be able to see the meteor shower tonight and pretty much any other night. Jerk.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    We live in rural southwest Wisconsin. The benefits include:

    4 seasons. Yes, some people like snow and cold, and the change in seasons.

    It's cheaper to live. Lower crime rate. Cleaner air.

    No neighbors within earshot. This can be good and bad, however being able to stand in the front yard to pee is so natural

    Trees and greenery, it is impossibly green here.

    Peace and quiet. I hate crowds and the city in general, you can have your museums and restaurants, I'll grow my own fresh veggies in the garden and not have to listen to the noise.

    The nearest city is 15 minutes away, some people commute a half hour or more despite living in the city, that must really suck.

    I can be on quiet low-traffic roads right out my door.
    this^^^^


    edit: well not RIGHT out my door, it's 1000 feet to the road!
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  4. #4
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    You leave out the big one...you go to the nearest township, and can usually lean your bike up against the bar unlocked, and not have to worry about it being there when you come back.

    See it every year when we go riding the tiny farm towns.

  5. #5
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    I agree! The only downside is I live five miles up a dirt road, so I have to drive to road bike. Upside is I can leave from my garage on my MTB. I will be sitting out on the deck tonight watching the perseids free from any other lighting though. It's not for everyone though since the winters can be brutal with 3' of snow in a single storm. I just snowboard down my driveway in that case.
    The possibility of physical and mental collapse is now very real. No sympathy for the Devil, keep that in mind. Buy the ticket, take the ride.

  6. #6
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    I recently moved to a more rural area in California with a lot of equestrian properties. It is kind of neat being able to ride your horse to local watering hole and being surrounded by farm critters instead of human neighbors. My concern is the news reports indicate an epic El Niņo is forthcoming. I'm happy for the drought relief but concerned about flooding this winter. Now might be a good time to stockpile sandbags and set some dirt aside to fill them.

  7. #7
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    It's all perspective. My wife and I enjoy seeing musicals and enjoying fine dining. I couldn't last in an inbred hollar. Too boring.

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    We have a well and a septic tank and a propane tank. I'm seriously considering getting a corn-cob pipe, a jug, and a banjo. But my wannabe-hick neighbors work for Hewlett Packard and Apple and stuff like that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    I recently moved to a more rural area in California with a lot of equestrian properties. It is kind of neat being able to ride your horse to local watering hole and being surrounded by farm critters instead of human neighbors. My concern is the news reports indicate an epic El Niņo is forthcoming. I'm happy for the drought relief but concerned about flooding this winter. Now might be a good time to stockpile sandbags and set some dirt aside to fill them.
    I'm gonna buy me a chain saw.

    Get a generator if you haven't got one already.

  10. #10
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    I do like having class 5-A riding right outside the door. I live right near where Lance Armstrong fell off his bike during the Tour de Erythropoietin.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    We live in rural southwest Wisconsin. The benefits include:

    4 seasons. Yes, some people like snow and cold, and the change in seasons.

    It's cheaper to live. Lower crime rate. Cleaner air.

    No neighbors within earshot. This can be good and bad, however being able to stand in the front yard to pee is so natural

    Trees and greenery, it is impossibly green here.

    Peace and quiet. I hate crowds and the city in general, you can have your museums and restaurants, I'll grow my own fresh veggies in the garden and not have to listen to the noise.

    The nearest city is 15 minutes away, some people commute a half hour or more despite living in the city, that must really suck.

    I can be on quiet low-traffic roads right out my door.
    Sounds like where I live minus the snow and extreme cold. Winter here is mild compared to where you are. I'm 15 minutes out of a small rural town. It's the norm to see horses in the drive-thru at Hardee's and tent revivals in the parking lot of Wal-Mart. The heat down here can be extreme in summer but with four seasons, none of them last longer than you can stand.
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  12. #12
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    A lot of folks use automobiles and drive to the occasional play/musical/restaurant but they miss out on wading through the panhandlers/drugies/winos that residents get to enjoy. Also, there is something peaceful about riding in the incessant and loud drone of traffic that riding lonely and forested mountain passes just can't provide. Besides, it's hell not having the tribe close by to tell you what and how to think.
    Quote Originally Posted by Notvintage View Post
    It's all perspective. My wife and I enjoy seeing musicals and enjoying fine dining. I couldn't last in an inbred hollar. Too boring.

  13. #13
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    I'd love to live in the country...but where I live (Illinois)...you basically only have two ways to go about it:

    -Be very wealthy: Country homes that are anywhere close to a good sized city are very expensive and for us common folk, it isn't happening.

    -Move very far away from your job: Of the country-living people I know that make what I do for a living, they all live a very good distance from our jobs. There are plenty of tiny towns and rural areas in Illinois...but unless you farm...there is zero work anywhere near them. Their morning commutes are 40-75 miles each way, every day. I have no interest in living this far from where I work.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwiftSolo View Post
    A lot of folks use automobiles and drive to the occasional play/musical/restaurant but they miss out on wading through the panhandlers/drugies/winos that residents get to enjoy.
    I have to agree. I do find myself cursing people and traffic the older I get.

  15. #15
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    You can still hear Free Bird about once an hour on most rural rock stations. That's huge.

  16. #16
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    We have a couple large cultural centers 2-3 hours away from us. I get all I can stand about once a month. I enjoy visiting big cities and seeing all the different people and cultures at times.
    We are not poor or inbred, but choose to make less money in our careers to live a better life in our opinion. Our house and land definitely are not cheap, but we pay less than a studio apartment in San Francisco but we have so much more.
    "I felt bad because I couldn't wheelie; until I met a man with no bicycle"

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    Our house and land definitely are not cheap, but we pay less than a studio apartment in San Francisco but we have so much more.
    If you like owing a big home that's great but I wouldn't assume "more" means "better" to everyone. Most people who live in small apartments know what they are doing and less is more to them. No lawn to mow, roof to fix, snow to shovel ect.
    Personally I'd rather spend my time doing things other than maintaining a home and a small apartment works out well in doing that for me. To each their own.

  18. #18
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    We have a smaller home, but some land with it. I agree apartment living is suitable for people of a certain lifestyle. I hate mowing an acre of lawn, to me it's a waste of time.
    "I felt bad because I couldn't wheelie; until I met a man with no bicycle"

  19. #19
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    Look up Lincoln, MA on Google maps street view.

    It's so nice!

    Do a virtual walk along some of those country lanes between tall trees and stately homes set way, way back from the road and with a lot of forested land between houses.

    It's so nice!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Typetwelve View Post
    I'd love to live in the country...but where I live (Illinois)...you basically only have two ways to go about it:

    -Be very wealthy: Country homes that are anywhere close to a good sized city are very expensive and for us common folk, it isn't happening.

    -Move very far away from your job: Of the country-living people I know that make what I do for a living, they all live a very good distance from our jobs. There are plenty of tiny towns and rural areas in Illinois...but unless you farm...there is zero work anywhere near them. Their morning commutes are 40-75 miles each way, every day. I have no interest in living this far from where I work.
    That's where it's different here. We have a 50-acre farm and a 60-year-old farm house in what seems like the middle of nowhere but we can be in a city like Knoxville or Chattanooga in an hour or so. The city I worked in before I retired is only 20 minutes away and there are more good manufacturing jobs there than there are people to do them. Amazon is advertising for help about twice a month. We both worked and farmed for a lot of years. When my husband retired we sold the cows and horses because he wasn't able to deal with them anymore and I didn't have time because I was working 60+ hours a week. Now we just garden but it's almost a full time job mowing this place all summer. I'm glad he can still do that. Now that I'm not working I'm enjoying the farm and riding! I have never lived around people and I don't think I would ever like having neighbors.
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  21. #21
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    Those Wisconsin farmers can have a certain swagger when they can visit anywhere by going there in a straight line in a light sports aircraft:

    http://www.cubcrafters.com/topcub

    It has been going on for half a century or more. It's great!

  22. #22
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    Yeah that inbred crack was totally out of line, the area we live in has more "new blood" than a lot of areas in big cities.
    Educated as well. Consider my "across the street neighbors" run a multi million dollar business. Yeah, That's right, it's a dairy farm. Country living isn't for the lazy, it's a lot of work my driveway can take 2 hours to clear after a moderate snow fall, and longer than that with a real snow storm.

    You city people, do us and yourselves a favor and stay in town. That will keep our taxes down and keep our neighborhood rural.

  23. #23
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    We live in the mountains between Silicon Valley and the coast.

    The farming up here is either Christmas trees or pot. The former doesn't pay a living wage unless you inherited the land. The latter has legal issues. My neighbors who aren't retired mostly work in Silicon Valley. The newer ones are all in tech. Home prices here are about the same as you'd pay in a nice but not wealthy area of Silicon Valley. It's only 10 minutes drive to town if you don't get stuck behind a tourist- the road is challenging and flatlanders are scared by it.


    The benefits? It's quiet. There are mtb trails and good road climbs right from home. I can ride my (very quiet) off road motorcycles on my land. I get to use tractors, chainsaws and other tools of destruction. I can pee in the yard when the well's broken and we're waiting for the well service company to fix it. My wife can have her huge garden and chickens

    Drawbacks? I have to use those tools of destruction to maintain the place. When the power goes out I have to hook up the generator. Down trees and rock slides can close the road. If I want to do a recovery ride I have to drive into town. Commute to work is an hour, but that's due to Silicon Valley traffic, not traffic on the mountain roads.

    Maybe when we're old and feeble we'll move into town.

  24. #24
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    funny, the township we live is REQUIRES that to build a residence you MUST own and build on 30 acres of contiguous land. Our lot was grandfathered in at 15.371 acres BUT I would have bought the adjacent lot if I had too (it was offered to me later and i am seriously sorry that i didn't buy it. The guy was asking 50 grand but offered it to me for 48, (since then I would have cost me that much in additional taxes) Taxes are not particularly low, (4800/year, would be about 6000 on 30 acres) I have two legitimate addresses, 2 wells and 2 septic systems as well as having nothing but high, dry ground. The riding here is spectacular, it is terminal moraine, lots of short, steep hills, marshland and small rivers

    edit: my normal 40 mile ride includes 1900 feet of climb at about a 4% average (from 2% to 9%) I am fro PA originally and I actually LOVE hills and climbing!
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  25. #25
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    My back yard. Yeah, how can I live like this. Oh, and only 45 minutes from Camden Yards, Ravens Stadium, Lyric Opera House, Johns Hopkins Hospital, and Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.

    1 mile from the Susquehanna River with Rockfish and top notch shad and herring fly fishing. 5 miles from Havre de Grace, complete with fine dining, waterfront, lighthouse and small town charm at the top of the Chesapeake.
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