Building a shed
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Thread: Building a shed

  1. #1
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    Building a shed

    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing. We all know that.

    Me and Mrs. 10ae built a greenhouse and shed over the last year or so.

    I am still looking for some of the pictures, but I have a few for starters.

    about done.jpg

    floor.jpg

    sink.jpg

    rocky2.jpg

    The structure is about 14' wide, 28' long, and roughly 8' ceiling.

    Structure is pole barn type, 4x6 columns, 2x6 rafters. Doors will eventually be green like the gate. Probably. Yeah.

    The important part is about 10' of the length. It is currently climate controlled with a solar fan, shades (also salvaged), and a 15 gallon barrel of water. More barrels will be added as I find them, and some sort of rain collection out back is in the works. It's surprisingly nice on shitty days inside the greenhouse. It gets hot in summer, and still gets too cold on really shitty nights, but we're learning.

    Siding, windows, sink, the one barrel inside, and raw material for rain chain were all salvaged. Some other things were acquired for a deal, and some of it was dear. The thing eventually cost way more than I am comfortable with saying out loud for a shed, but what the hell. It's almost done.

    We started in the spring of 18.

    Floor is cedar. Rocky approves.

    Some good construction pictures are somewhere, probably on a flash drive in Wilmington.

    Stay tuned.
    Last edited by 10ae1203; 4 Weeks Ago at 03:08 PM.

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    I like the floor.
    Rocky looks ready to bark out some orders.

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    Nice! Did you anchor the 4x6s into the ground at all?

    I was all set to build something similar to use as a wood shed until I realized the pine tree my wood pile sits under has grown big and broad enough that it does a real good job of keeping snow off of my firewood.

    Score 1 for procrastination!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dir-t View Post
    Nice! Did you anchor the 4x6s into the ground at all?

    I was all set to build something similar to use as a wood shed until I realized the pine tree my wood pile sits under has grown big and broad enough that it does a real good job of keeping snow off of my firewood.

    Score 1 for procrastination!
    Yup
    Footings are 12 inch holes to 36ish depth.

    I bought 12 inch precast footings, but the second rental auger (long story) was not quite 12 inch in reality.

    So

    There is a massive footing of bag mix in each hole. Less embedment than I desired, but you can't win em all.

    Anyhow, nice score for you on the free green woodshed

  6. #6
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    Brilliant, I have subscribed.
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together

  7. #7
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    Nice photography.

    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together

  8. #8
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    Very, very nice! So that's where you've been! Digging in the dirt and pounding on nails. Woooohoooooooo!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

  9. #9
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    You put in wood touching the dirt?
    BANNED

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    You put in wood touching the dirt?
    Yes

    Not home center wood.

    Stuff treated for the purpose.

  11. #11
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    OK, nice looking shed. Enjoy it.
    I would not have done it that way, but that is just me I guess.
    BANNED

  12. #12
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    That is a FINE looking shed!

    Color me envious.
    .
    Stout beers under trees, please.

  13. #13
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    I love it--it has the proper element of overkill that is necessary for a Lounge post of a construction project (I blame T0G for that).

    I'm interested--do you live in an area where this had to be permitted? Or you could just do it? We're restricted to 10x10 for an unpermitted structure--which to me is nothing more than meddlesome preferences.
    Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10ae1203 View Post
    Yes

    Not home center wood.

    Stuff treated for the purpose.
    I did the same when we built the new deck. Most people don't realize there are different grades of wood treatment.
    Exposure to weather
    Ground contact
    Direct bury.

    Also, some is only impervious to insect damage not rot.

    Since it is a free standing structure, even if a post failed, it's not that difficult to repair, particularly since you know how it was put together.

    In my opinion, fastener failure is the worst problem with treated lumber. I made that mistake a few times , but they were on temporary (20 years) structures. The copper arsenate in the old stuff had a galvanic reaction to some of the fasteners. The new ceramic coatings should be better. And GAWD BLESS TORX!!!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by paredown View Post
    I love it--it has the proper element of overkill that is necessary for a Lounge post of a construction project (I blame T0G for that).

    I'm interested--do you live in an area where this had to be permitted? Or you could just do it? We're restricted to 10x10 for an unpermitted structure--which to me is nothing more than meddlesome preferences.
    Hey, I resemble that remark! And look who's talking! Imo, it is impossible to over build....... Unless you have to tear it back out..... Then, GAWD BLESS TORX!
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10ae1203 View Post
    Yes

    Not home center wood.

    Stuff treated for the purpose.
    That's a great looking shed! I built one this summer too, but ours is quite a bit smaller and simpler. It's 10x14. I wanted to put it on a concrete slab, but due to the rules in my town that would make it a 'permanent structure' and I would have to permit it and observe setbacks. The shed is in a corner of our lot so the setbacks are important. I couldn't find any pins and our city has terrible records of that type of thing, and it was fairly expensive (in comparison to the shed) to get a survey done, so I basically built up a gravel pad and placed pavers in it to build the shed on. I did research and believe the treated lumber will work fine, but have contingency plans for replacing bits if needed. I have strategically placed pavers under the floor and lumber so I can lift the shed through the floor if I need to replace any or all of the floor framing.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10ae1203 View Post
    Anything worth doing is worth overdoing. We all know that.

    Me and Mrs. 10ae built a greenhouse and shed over the last year or so.

    I am still looking for some of the pictures, but I have a few for starters.

    about done.jpg

    floor.jpg

    sink.jpg

    rocky2.jpg

    The structure is about 14' wide, 28' long, and roughly 8' ceiling.

    Structure is pole barn type, 4x6 columns, 2x6 rafters. Doors will eventually be green like the gate. Probably. Yeah.

    The important part is about 10' of the length. It is currently climate controlled with a solar fan, shades (also salvaged), and a 15 gallon barrel of water. More barrels will be added as I find them, and some sort of rain collection out back is in the works. It's surprisingly nice on shitty days inside the greenhouse. It gets hot in summer, and still gets too cold on really shitty nights, but we're learning.

    Siding, windows, sink, the one barrel inside, and raw material for rain chain were all salvaged. Some other things were acquired for a deal, and some of it was dear. The thing eventually cost way more than I am comfortable with saying out loud for a shed, but what the hell. It's almost done.

    We started in the spring of 18.

    Floor is cedar. Rocky approves.

    Some good construction pictures are somewhere, probably on a flash drive in Wilmington.

    Stay tuned.
    Great job, but you are missing some obvious requirements: bike storage racks, Park bike stand, boxes of old useless bike parts

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
    Great job, but you are missing some obvious requirements: bike storage racks, Park bike stand, boxes of old useless bike parts
    Very good point, this IS still a RBR forum after all and even the Lounge has some NNC priorities.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

  19. #19
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    Bike is in the garage

  20. #20
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    Yes, we had to get a permit.

    Previously we had a survey done to locate corners, which we used to put up a fence to separate from the looney tunes on one side.

    This survey was useful in the zoning process for the shed.

    We get one outbuilding so we went for it.

    Zoning, building permit, inspections, and a visit from the county assessor.

    Oh, and i hate the star screws. Wtf do they need a different tip for every size?

  21. #21
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    Nice shed. I've also built a couple, not quite so nice as yours. One was an 8 x 12 garden shed for storing lawn mower and yard tools and such like. The other is my wood shed. My sheds don't store bikes, but by having sheds, I have lots of room in my garage for bikes and boats and workshop, but not cars, unfortunately.

  22. #22
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    I knew there were more pictures.

    Well begun is half done. Batter boards establish grade reference as well as wall lines.

    Pop's plumb bob transfers corner points to ground. Grade fell off over a foot from high to low point. Funny, it looked pretty flat.

    Yellow thing **** the bed when starting. Rocky and I returned it to home, and ran up the road to another rental place, which had a slightly smaller auger. Slightly smaller enough that the precast wouldn't fit.

    Inspector had to see the holes. He also looked at framing and completion.

    1.JPG

    2.jpg

    3.JPG

    4.jpg

    6.jpg
    Last edited by 10ae1203; 4 Weeks Ago at 10:13 AM.

  23. #23
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    Setting columns. Use batter board strings to maintain alignment. Plumb up, brace, backfill, check, tamp, repeat.

    Use spacers to maintain alignment, etc.

    Don't hit the door post too many times with the dingo when removing topsoil.

    There's a perforated pipe under the greenhouse side which drains to daylight under the hedgerow.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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    • File Type: jpg 10.JPG (119.8 KB, 8 views)

  24. #24
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    Rafters are 5/12, same as house. Ridge board is a 2x8. Setting a 16' yellow pine 2x8 on deadmen by myself was more fun than having a bunch of helpers on roofing day.

    Too many foremen on one task makes for a lot of the you-shoulds.

    But it is good to have friends, I guess.

    Far side of the utility shed has a deeper overhang for storage.

    Mrs. 10ae painted all the rafters, ridge board, and nailers for the greenhouse side in advance because of the clear material. We discussed no paint, black paint, and siding color. We settled on siding color.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by 10ae1203; 4 Weeks Ago at 10:15 AM.

  25. #25
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    Ok then, that's more like it. Got a lot more complicated seeing the initial steps! You two have help or do it all yourselves? You hand dig the post holes? What is the yellow thing? The red power shovel is cute, yours? You going to put a little wood stove in it to heat it? Do you need heat?


    Edit... Never mind post hole question., I have nightmares about post holes. I put a fence in for my mom in PA. I dug 150 potholes, 36 inches deep through clay. (clamshell type digger.) 55 years ago and my hands still hurt!
    Last edited by Touch0Gray; 4 Weeks Ago at 03:50 PM.
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

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