• 05-28-2015
    sookpuppet
    Dealing with Cancer : My version
    I am a regular here (over 10 years) but am using this new account name as I want to be anonymous and some people here know my real identity. I got diagnosed with stage one throat cancer last week after getting a biopsy done the week before and started radiation treatments today. When they told me last week I was there with my wife. I teared up instantly and thought " sh*t, it's just sad the sh*t I'm going to miss out on" The doctor gave me two courses of treatment and as for getting a second opinion, no way, I want it treated as soon as possible. I haven't looked up the prognosis for my disease but at the moment I don't see it as a fight with cancer. I see it as living as long as possible with cancer. I am 50 yrs old, my kids are in the 6th and fourth grades. I was born with cancer and my lifestyle (light periodic smoking and hard drinking, not so periodic) gave it the opportunity to bloom. I will always have cancer, we all do, in our genetic footprint. The luckier ones of us just don't meet it. I met it last week and outside of my wife, only my siblings know( no doubt they have told their spouses). I like coming here and hopefully I can get some advice and maybe get pointed towards some good online forums for support. I will need it so my wife doesn't have to carry too much of the burden. I got told today that I can still exercise, just make sure the lines they drew on my body for lining up the radiation machine don't get washed off. That is great cause with the pain in the throat I am off all hard food and just this week I have lost nearly 10 pounds. I am looking at getting back to near my best BMI which is 35 pounds away. I passionately hate what LA did with his cycling career but oddly enough I am drawing some inspiration from him. Might re-read "it's not about the bike". I last read it in 1999 and gave it to a buddy who had a friend with cancer. Well I'll check in later. Next round of radiation is tomorrow.
    Any of you survivors feel free to add your experiences please.
  • 05-28-2015
    pmf
    My wife was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago. We sought out two opinions and went with Johns Hopkins for treatment. It was an hour away in Baltimore, but I think it was the right choice. Doctors vary quite a bit. Don't be timid in getting a second opinion. The guy we didn't go with wanted to do stuff that the guy we did go with said wasn't necessary.

    My wife was, as you certainly are, scared. It was a tense time. I wanted to slap the nurse who gave her a pink bag with cancer literature in it and said "face it, you've got cancer". She had surgery (a lumpectomy) and it came back pre-cancerous (whatever that means). She still goes to Hopkins for monitoring, but they've found nothing to worry about. If I ever need any serious care, I know where i'm going and it ain't Fairfax Inova Hospital.

    Try keeping a positive attitude if you can. Easy for me to say. They did catch it early. I wish you good luck.
  • 05-28-2015
    Christine
    F*** cancer. Hard to think of anything else that can be said.

    My grandmother had died at age 42 from Hodgkin's. Finally, just recently, got my father to tell me her age when she died (he never talks about it).

    Other grandmother died in her eighties or so- jaw (?) cancer, something unusual. I figured as a farm woman, she must've smoked or chewed, but I'm told she had none of that. Crap......yeah I got all kinds of dormant, genetic time bombs.

    Best of luck with all this fighting. Damn effing cancer.
  • 05-28-2015
    Winn
    These guys are reported to beat it often.

    Gerson Institute

    Cancer sucks
  • 05-28-2015
    Blue CheeseHead
    My thoughts and prayers are with you.

    You are young and being stage 1, it sounds like it was caught early. Hang in there and fight. Look at this as an opportunity to re prioritize. None of us know when the end might come. My dad was 54 when struck with a heart attack. I wish he had worked less and enjoyed the family more. (I was 10).

    All my best.
  • 05-28-2015
    Len J
    First off I'm sorry you have to deal with this.

    Secondly, Attitude matters. The whole thing is scary as hell..... it easy to let yourself get stuck living in the future, try to live In the present...... control what you can control.

    Finally, surround yourself with energy givers & avoid energy drainers.

    Wishing you the best.

    Len
  • 05-28-2015
    paredown
    I'm sorry to read this--

    Agree with PMF (second opinions are worth it, always...) and with Len--attitude does matter a great deal--and I think finding inspiration from LA is a good thing.

    You are young, relatively healthy and they caught it early--stage one.

    So you need to focus on the project at hand--getting healthy and cancer-free. You have to be able to imagine the future--seeing the kids graduate would be a good goal and visualize that happening, visualize health, and visualize letting the cancer leave your body while you are being treated.
  • 05-28-2015
    Wetworks
    In completing due diligence for suspected heart issues, (whilst being reasonably sure it was my ulcer), a routine CT scan (and sharp-eyed radiologist) discovered a small lump on my thyroid that they felt I should have looked at. Having had experience reading scans, I had already determined that what was there likely was a malignancy. After further scans and a subsequent biopsy it was determined it was in fact cancerous. Having already resigned myself to that prior to the results of the biopsy, I was not as stressed as you may think.

    What really sent me for a loop was the nature of the malignancy; while most people get one of two, typically easy to treat variants, I instead got diagnosed with medullary thyroid carcinoma (no radiation and little chemo effectiveness). Worse, there typically was a genetic component associated with it, so I had the added stress of awaiting pathology's determination as to which variant it was and if it would affect my children (thankfully it was sporadic, not genetic). The worst part is this cancer never truly goes away, requiring monitoring for the rest of my life, the proverbial waiting for the shoe to drop syndrome, every few months.

    So, even having prepared myself I still had that "ah, f*ck", kick to the gut moment, just like you did. And it sucks. And it's likely no one will understand just how much it sucks other than you or someone who has gone through it. And it will suck afterwards, when you beat it, that people will ask "how are you feeling" with that morbid, walking in a cemetery tone. But you know what? You'll eventually come to terms with the whole thing and will likely look at EVERYTHING somewhat differently.

    I wish you the best in what is sure to be a taxing (mentally, emotionally and physically) challenge. As someone said earlier, the right attitude helps, positive, pragmatic and realistic. Good luck and keep us up to date.
  • 05-28-2015
    proclaimer888
    Best wishes and Prayers for you and your family. You are correct in that we all are living with the disease, just don't know it. My father passed fighting this [email protected]#6t way to young and I am sure I will too. Live strong and never surrender.
  • 05-28-2015
    love4himies
    I wish you the best and that you will be able to beat this and watch your kids grow up and your future grand children.
  • 05-28-2015
    JetSpeed
    Best to you. Stay positive and focused on your future. You can beat this.
  • 05-28-2015
    sookpuppet
    Thanks for all the sage advice and best wishes. I feel positive but as with life there will be highs and lows I am sure. Second opinion I am not really sure about as the next hospital is hours away and I have a busy job and such. The radiation treatments are standard first stage treatment so that should do it, fingers crossed. If that isn't enough then yes second opinion time. Len J as usual your advice so often mirrors my own thoughts just in a much better style of writing.
    Bluecheesehead, yeah I hear you on prioritizing. I want to hug my kids all the time but I'm not a hugger so that will scare the **** out of them. Just keep chasing them and a lot less getting angry over, in the end, trivial ****. Plus shouting isn't good for my voice box. Lucky them.
    Wetworks thanks for the firsthand account. Yeah I hate pity and charity, that's why we aren't telling anyone, I'm alive and kicking and I don't want to be pitied, for both my and my family's sake.
  • 05-28-2015
    kiwisimon
    Wishing you all the best and looking forward to reading your reports about riding and stupid lounge stuff. Kia Kaha!
  • 05-29-2015
    MoonHowl
    Wishing you the best in fighting this. There is something to be said (esp. in cases when there is a well established protocol) with getting on with the treatment and not delaying and causing additional stress by second guessing. I understand completely what you are saying about Lance. Lance's book came out about the same time my wife was facing chemo and radiation. It certainly helped me to see a guy who went through chemo winning the tour at that time.
  • 05-29-2015
    nOOky
    My brother is almost able to go back to work after dealing with lung cancer for a couple of years, apart from numbness in his hands from chemo he is cancer-free. My sister died 2 years ago from pancreatic cancer, she chose not to tell the family except for one sister. Ny father didn't die from cancer, but he had spots on his lungs, COPD got him first.

    I would also get a second opinion, and I would learn and study up about your particular type as much as possible. I had atrial fibrillation a while back, and I armed myself with as much knowledge of what it was and the possible remedies as I could. You want to educate yourself so you know what the doctors are talking about, and so you know the correct questions to ask, and it helps mentally to know what you are up against so it's less scary.

    If I have learned anything from my own and others experiences, it's to try and educate yourself, and tell other people important to you. You'd be surprised at how much your friends and family really do care, how much they would want to know, and how much support they can offer you.

    Good luck!
  • 05-29-2015
    Christine
    And it will suck afterwards, when you beat it, that people will ask "how are you feeling" with that morbid, walking in a cemetery tone.

    My neighbor just got over breast cancer. I made this mistake at first- "How are you feeling??" It was sincere but I could tell by her reaction, basically just brushing it off, that it's past history. Sure, most cancer is an ongoing battle, but at the moment it's GONE, so I'm savoring that. I get it now!

    John's friend is starting treatment for his brain, and it's frustrating b/c 1) they don't talk about it (his wife will talk to our mutual friend, who is acting as the gatekeeper of info) and 2) John only talks about regular stuff with his friend. He lets his friend bring it up.

    This is understandable, they don't want to make it the focus of everything, and his wife doesn't want to repeat the same story constantly. But also difficult to not know exactly what's happening. They know we're here for any help they might need, that's all we can do.
  • 05-29-2015
    Len J
    Great Perspective IMO

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joannamontgomery/why-i-no-longer-say-fck-cancer_b_6801334.html


    "You know that icky feeling you get in your stomach when you're fighting with someone ... when the conflict hangs over your head like a dark cloud, robbing you of feeling joy at any given point in your day? Well, that's how I often felt when I was in the mindset of "fighting" my disease. It was stressful, and at times exhausting."

    "Having done it both ways now, "fighting" disease with a battlefield mentality vs. dealing with disease from a place of knowledge and gratitude, I can say that, for me, the latter is a much more peaceful, joyful way to live. This doesn't mean I'm not a fighter. I am. Until my last breath I'll continue to pursue the best treatment options, going wherever I have to go, doing whatever I have to do to get them. But I'll do it with love, for myself and my family, grateful for the opportunity.

    And cursing cancer or anything else, particularly something powerful and dangerous? Why poke the bear? Why muster inside me that kind of anger or negativity?
    For me, cancer is a chronic illness. I'll treat it wholeheartedly each time it flares up, and do whatever I can between occurrences to keep the disease at bay for as long as possible. And I'll live my life with joy and gratitude in the meantime. Because peace is less stressful and more sustainable than war, and love is more powerful than hate. Always."
  • 05-29-2015
    sookpuppet
    1 Attachment(s)
    I am going to get a tattoo after I get an all clear from the docs. Some really tacky designs out there but who am I to critique other cancer sufferers' tastes. The wife has promised me a dirty kinky weekend away as well, she knows what motivates me. The pain in the throat has subsided, the irony is the radiation will slowly lead to more pain again. this is what the mask that they screw your head down to immobilize it looks like.
  • 05-29-2015
    P...Pokey
    My thoughts are with you, SP.
  • 05-29-2015
    bigrider
    My thoughts and prayers are with you. I have a cancer infused family. My Dad lived with peace and joy for the most part of his last cancer which took his life. He fought off cancer two times before and lived a full life for 78 years. For survivors, cancer is often a gift of clarity. Every day is a beautiful gift and when you fight your way through this you will remember just how special TODAY really is.
  • 05-30-2015
    r0gue
    Hell Ya, **** Cancer man. Fight ON! God be with you and your family and I wish you the very VERY best.
  • 05-30-2015
    10ae1203
    That head mask sort of freaks me out. Be strong.
  • 05-30-2015
    sookpuppet
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by 10ae1203 View Post
    That head mask sort of freaks me out. Be strong.

    It freaked me out at first as I am sometimes a bit closetphobic[sic]. Mr first MRI sent my heart rate into zone 1 Now I see it as my friend. When the machine fires up I always tell it "Do your magic please" When the radiation is going on you can't swallow or move your throat. I'm paranoid about that and feel like every heartbeat is moving my face inches, the brain is a strange thing. Thanks for the wishes.

    I have found it helps to keep your eyes open. More sensory perception controls the panic a lot. I see why they blindfold prisoners to unsettle them.
  • 05-30-2015
    snapdragen
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    And it will suck afterwards, when you beat it, that people will ask "how are you feeling" with that morbid, walking in a cemetery tone.

    This is so damn true. Once a week a friend of mine back east calls, it's the same thing. "How are you feeling" I think he expects me to announce my impending death one of these days.

    I'm a stage one ovarian cancer survivor. Sock, you and I are very lucky people -- early detection! Treatment may suck, but you can and will come through this.
  • 05-30-2015
    FujiSteve
    Do whatever you need to do, but don't let people tell you that have to be optimistic and think positive. They do that so that they can feel better.

    I loved this video

    Barbara Ehrenreich on Optimism (and experiences with optimists while she was suffering from breast cancer)
  • 05-31-2015
    Snakebit
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by snapdragen View Post
    This is so damn true. Once a week a friend of mine back east calls, it's the same thing. "How are you feeling" I think he expects me to announce my impending death one of these days.

    I'm a stage one ovarian cancer survivor. Sock, you and I are very lucky people -- early detection! Treatment may suck, but you can and will come through this.

    A lady I worked with was diagnosed with breast cancer and has undergone treatment for it. she breezed through the chemo and radiation treatments and never stopped working. Strong lady.

    My dermatologist recently found four spots on me, two on my face and two on my hand. I used a chemo cream on my face and it was very unpleasant. I spent 5 weeks doing very little more than sitting in a chair, too tired and weak to really care. I can't imagine how hard it is to undergo treatment for the real deal. You all have my admiration and best wishes.
  • 05-31-2015
    wchevron
    My friends dad got diagnosed with stage 2 throat cancer 2 yrs ago. He's 70. Went through chemo and radiation, came out cancer free after all of it so don't give up hope.
  • 05-31-2015
    Touch0Gray
    the only advise i can give comes from the perspective of a guy that has never had to deal with a diagnosis on himself. But I have watched both sisters pull through diagnosis and treatment. My youngest, 3 times, three different cancers. I can only wish you strength and health for the future, Remember, we really are here for you, we are real people behind our avatars and nicknames and many of us care very deeply about the subject and our imaginary fiends. Fight it with all your heart and soul and remember, we are here to listen and do what we can.
  • 05-31-2015
    Scooper
    Joe Biden's son, Beau, died yesterday of brain cancer. He was 46. Bummer.
  • 05-31-2015
    Wetworks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Scooper View Post
    Joe Biden's son, Beau, died yesterday of brain cancer. He was 46. Bummer.

    I'm sure the OP appreciates you bringing that depressing tidbit into the thread; I'm sure they have not been bombarded by wall-to-wall news coverage about it.:rolleyes:

    You must be a hit at parties, we need to hang. Digits, pronto.
  • 05-31-2015
    daniell
    My wife was diagnosed with cancer about six months ago. I lost 20 pounds and could not sleep. My wife was more worried about me than herself. I am 68 and she is 65. We got married when I was 22.
    She had cancer of the uterus. First the bad news. The lab found an aggressive cancer after the surgery. Now the good news. It was stage 1A. The lympth nodes were clean. Since it was an aggressive cancer, they gave her three radiation treatments and 4 chemo treatments. Two months ago her scan came back clean.
  • 05-31-2015
    sookpuppet
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Wetworks View Post
    I'm sure the OP appreciates you bringing that depressing tidbit into the thread; I'm sure they have not been bombarded by wall-to-wall news coverage about it.:rolleyes:

    You must be a hit at parties, we need to hang. Digits, pronto.

    No worries, Scoop is welcome to put that here. Yes people die of this disease and now I know, more that than I did two weeks ago. Beau sounds like a wonderful person. I am sure he was genuine when he spoke of his family and that speaks volumes about him. I see this as a way to refocus and put my priorities in line. Cycling comes in about 10th.
  • 05-31-2015
    sookpuppet
    My Mom is 83, I haven't told her this news. I live thousands of miles away from her and this isn't something she needs to be worried about. She is a classic worrier and would be more worried about it than I am, or at least she would let it affect her as if it were that case. Is keeping news like this away from a parent not a bad idea.

    Obviously my kids, they won't hear anything from me about how or what is making Daddy need some work for his sore throat. My wife just asked them to cut me some slack when I get tired. I haven't yet felt especially tired.

    TOG, Snap thanks for the stories. I know you both so well through the years ( we have never met) stuff like that really is appreciated.

    Daniell, great news. Wchevron, likewise, great news. Thanks for posting.
  • 05-31-2015
    Steve B.
    The interesting and comforting thing is that dealing with a lot of cancers is different today then 30-40 years ago. I was diagnosed with Chronic Leukemia 15 mos. ago and if it hadn't been an aggressive version, I might have gone 20 years before having to deal with it. This is currently a disease that has no cure, only treatments to manage. So I just finished 6 mos. of chemo that was a very targeted treatment with relatively mild to moderate side effects, though cycling has taught me how to deal with suffering so maybe the treatments might have been worse for a non cyclist !. But I know that 40 years ago I would not be here typing (besides there being no internet !). Such is the advances in medicine.

    Those advances are more then half the battle, alongside good medical insurance !, attitude is the other. Right now I'm more concerned about a screwed up knee that keeps me off the bike then I am about my CLL. Once my knee gets better, and hopefully it won't need surgery, I'm back on the bike and the CLL is not slowing me down as there's no reason. My doc keeps me in the right attitude telling me he's seeing HUGE advances in treatments with targeted drugs for all kinds of cancers, my sister (the retired nurse) said the same that with the ability to sequence DNA, the advances are happening in leaps and bounds, so the goal is to treat for for the immediate future, when even better drugs are available.

    That changes the whole attitude of how you look at your disease and allows you to consider that you might actually live to be 80, when dementia will kick in and you will have forgotten about your cancer battle, LOL !.

    Such is how you live your life today. Am I scared ?, a bit. Have I been stressed ?, yup, but only a bit more really than about a whole lot of everything else that life throws at you. It's now just "one more thing" and I can deal with that.
  • 05-31-2015
    daniell
    I know of someone who also had throat cancer. After under going radiation therapy, he is considered cured. He then got the ok to have hip replacement surgery. Now he is enjoying his life.
  • 05-31-2015
    Wetworks
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sookpuppet View Post
    My Mom is 83, I haven't told her this news. I live thousands of miles away from her and this isn't something she needs to be worried about. She is a classic worrier and would be more worried about it than I am, or at least she would let it affect her as if it were that case. Is keeping news like this away from a parent not a bad idea.

    Obviously my kids, they won't hear anything from me about how or what is making Daddy need some work for his sore throat. My wife just asked them to cut me some slack when I get tired. I haven't yet felt especially tired.

    TOG, Snap thanks for the stories. I know you both so well through the years ( we have never met) stuff like that really is appreciated.

    Daniell, great news. Wchevron, likewise, great news. Thanks for posting.

    Personally, I told everyone. I have two developmentally delayed children and for a long time I never spoke of their problems (or by extension, mine). That, I believe, made me an incredibly cantankerous, crabby person. When I decided to share that information and tell people what it was like to live this life (not for pity, just for empathy), I felt much better about both the situation and with life in general.

    Same went for my cancer diagnosis. I was fine with sharing and letting people know what to expect. In a way, I may have had it easier than you as I did not have to explain it really to my children and my parents are significantly younger (60s). As someone going into the health field (second career as an RN) I can fully appreciate your wish to keep things private, but I will say that for me, the decision to share and be politely matter of fact went a long way to keeping MY stress down, which can go a long way for others when it comes to coping, IMO.

    Anytime you feel the need to talk/vent, feel free to hit me up, here or via PM.
  • 06-07-2015
    sookpuppet
    I am 30% through the treatments. That is 12 of 35. I have been feeling really good, better than before i was diagnosed. I have been walking jogging and cycling and losing weight has really helped. My voice is changing. On Saturdey I felt good and bought one of these for my nephew who was doing good in his studies at university to celebrate his passing a fairly big assignment. It was my first "drink" in a month, I had one 11 ounce drink. Bad idea. Sunday morning I felt like I had been hit by a truck. Throat really sore, headache and sore guts and I lost a day i could have spent with the kids lying in bed feeling sorry for myself and swallowing pain killers. Just goes to show how toxic alcohol really is. I think I can live without it. back to healthy food again for me.

    And I love this drop. It is a good beer.
    https://www.duvel.com/sites/default/...beer/duvel.jpg
  • 06-08-2015
    mikejd
    I got diagnosed with a stage 2 cancer (would rather not get into specifics about the disease itself) at the end of April. I have been undergoing chemo since May 4. They have me on a pretty aggressive regiment so I'm almost 2/3 of the way through it. Tomorrow I go in for another day of treatment. I do not know what radiation is like, but chemo sucks. I mean, it really sucks. i feel like hell now almost all the time with a lot of fatigue and nausea. I used to have good hair; that's gone for now. Plus I am missing out on a lot in life, trips and so forth. I never thought I would have to deal with something like this at the age of 30. A year ago at this time I was pumped up to ride a double century in Vermont. Now, I am out of breath when I go up the stairs too fast. The one good thing is the prognosis for my particular cancer is good.

    Best of luck on your war with this.
  • 06-08-2015
    Christine
    My husband's friend came over the house for BBQ yesterday, first time we've seen him since learning the brain tumors were cancerous. He just started radiation/chemo so the side effects haven't set in just yet, and he takes anti-seizure meds as a preventative measure; still not allowed to drive or ride a bike or anything fun/independent.

    He's also doing immunotherapy, which sounds new but promising. He's still himself, just less animated/more tired. Quiet but alert. We are bracing ourselves though, knowing what's ahead.
  • 06-08-2015
    Len J
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    My husband's friend came over the house for BBQ yesterday, first time we've seen him since learning the brain tumors were cancerous. He just started radiation/chemo so the side effects haven't set in just yet, and he takes anti-seizure meds as a preventative measure; still not allowed to drive or ride a bike or anything fun/independent.

    He's also doing immunotherapy, which sounds new but promising. He's still himself, just less animated/more tired. Quiet but alert. We are bracing ourselves though, knowing what's ahead.

    Good for you for not treating him like he is contagious. Many people do
  • 06-08-2015
    Christine
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Len J View Post
    Good for you for not treating him like he is contagious. Many people do

    Aww hellll no. We love this guy to pieces. I even let him have a bottle or two from my secret stash of artisan ginger ale (guests normally get Canada Dry.) :p
  • 06-08-2015
    Len J
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Christine View Post
    Aww hellll no. We love this guy to pieces. I even let him have a bottle or two from my secret stash of artisan ginger ale (guests normally get Canada Dry.) :p

    I was amazed when I saw some people in our lives suddenly disappear when Ella was diagnosed. Itís their problem, but it happens more than I expected and it does hurt. Of course the other side of this is that people that we had very little expectation of came through like champs and were way more supportive than we ever expected.

    Donít get me started about how many stories we heard of spouses/significant others that couldnít take the caretaking and bailed on their partners when they found out they had cancer.


    Len
  • 06-08-2015
    bigrider
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Len J View Post
    I was amazed when I saw some people in our lives suddenly disappear when Ella was diagnosed. Itís their problem, but it happens more than I expected and it does hurt. Of course the other side of this is that people that we had very little expectation of came through like champs and were way more supportive than we ever expected.

    Donít get me started about how many stories we heard of spouses/significant others that couldnít take the caretaking and bailed on their partners when they found out they had cancer.


    Len


    Everybody wants to believe they will be like Robin Williams in Good Will Hunting when dealing with a spouse with cancer. Some people love themselves waaaay more than they love their spouses. Sad but true.
  • 06-08-2015
    Christine
    I heard that men often have no clue how to be nurturing, never having been taught/expected to be, so they often bail. So wives often have a worse time of it as the patient.

    My main fear, aside from seeing our friend getting his ass kicked around by the treatments, is not knowing what to say or how to be there etc. But we do remind them to call us if they need help with stuff, and they do so far.
  • 06-09-2015
    marekli
    cancer is not one disease it is many and not all types of cancer are equally evil. Lance Armstrong would not have survived pancreatic cancer. Knowledge = empowerment. Read up on currently available treatments b/c cancer therapy is a rapidly evolving field. You definitely want to see the best doctor you can afford under your insurance plan. There's no cutting corners and really no time to save money b/c the treamtent is really expensive or the doctor/treatment center too far away. Make it your #1 priority to get the best treatment, then you will feel you did your best.

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by nOOky View Post
    My brother is almost able to go back to work after dealing with lung cancer for a couple of years, apart from numbness in his hands from chemo he is cancer-free. My sister died 2 years ago from pancreatic cancer, she chose not to tell the family except for one sister. Ny father didn't die from cancer, but he had spots on his lungs, COPD got him first.

    I would also get a second opinion, and I would learn and study up about your particular type as much as possible. I had atrial fibrillation a while back, and I armed myself with as much knowledge of what it was and the possible remedies as I could. You want to educate yourself so you know what the doctors are talking about, and so you know the correct questions to ask, and it helps mentally to know what you are up against so it's less scary.

    If I have learned anything from my own and others experiences, it's to try and educate yourself, and tell other people important to you. You'd be surprised at how much your friends and family really do care, how much they would want to know, and how much support they can offer you.

    Good luck!

  • 06-12-2015
    Eretz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by sookpuppet View Post
    On reflection I don't like this thread title. It should be Dealing with Cancer : My version.. Any chance the mods can edit the title????

    Wishing you good thoughts.

    Hope you overcome it.
  • 06-15-2015
    sookpuppet
    So I am nearly half way through the 35 sessions of radiation. The pain has got progressively more as the cumulative effects of the radiation keep building. I had a visual examination of the cancerous areas today and the doctors seemed pretty happy with it all. I sent my siblings this link for them to better understand the symptoms.
    Radiation therapy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers

    The cyclists brother focused on this sentence This can lead to weight loss and malnutrition. and asked me how that was going. Well minus 15 pounds in three weeks. Feeling lighter but also get tired a lot easier. Getting sick of drinking my meals and as even swallowing water is painful, solid food, not for another few weeks I think.
    I take some ibuprofen before I head off to work but other than that I stay away from them. I have never liked painkillers and if the cost of my cancer cure is a few weeks of discomfort, so be it. After all the pleasure I got from my drinking and smoking I don't think it's right to cheat the payback by numbing the experience. I was raised Catholic but I haven't been religious for 30 years. I am still agnostic to my core, which seems wierd when people here say they are praying for me. I'll take those prayers but have never ever given up a prayer of my own. Best wishes I can relate to, but prayer.... IDK.
    So that's where it is, go through the regime and hope that the wonders of modern science kick in and eradicate these poisonous cells from my body. I'm extremely optimistic. Again, thnks to all here for your thoughts, shared experiences and thoughts and prayers. SP.
  • 06-16-2015
    Srode
    Wow, that sucks. A good friend had throat cancer - he beat it over a couple years without surgery, and he's been Cancer free several years now - Keep the faith, you can win this battle, hang in there.
  • 06-16-2015
    Touch0Gray
    We are thinking about you, stay strong. My sister (who has had 3 bouts with 3 different cancers) says "considering the options..."
  • 06-16-2015
    Christine
    Best wishes I can relate to, but prayer.... IDK.

    No worries, I haven't prayed a word for you :p But hoping for the best, and am glad you're halfway through already (that went fast......well for us on the sidelines anyway :rolleyes: )

    I'm glad you're posting about your experience because I'm genuinely curious (cancer being so damn common) and don't want to ask John's friend too many questions. By all means, no pressure to be positive here, so vent all you want.