Digital Camera Recomendations?
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  1. #1
    a Freds Fred
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    Digital Camera Recommendations?

    Can anyone recommend a digital camera around $300? I am looking for something with a fast shutter speed that will allow cool shots of the local crits, a decent zoom of say 3x or 4x optical, yet is small enough to fit a jersey pocket. I was considering the Cannon SD400 before I read a review of mechanical problems they've been having. The reviewer even flatout warned against buying the SD500 model.

    Any tips or suggestions is greatly appreciated.
    Last edited by Bryan; 09-07-2005 at 08:38 AM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan
    Can anyone recommend a digital camera around $300? I am looking for something with a fast shutter speed that will allow cool shots of the local crits, a decent zoom of say 3x or 4x optical, yet is small enough to fit a jersey pocket. I was considering the Cannon SD400 before I read a review of mechanical problems they've been having. The reviewer even flatout warned against buying the SD500 model.

    Any tips or suggestions is greatly appreciated.
    I love my Canon S50 (think the current model is S70). Canon and Nikon are largely considered to have the best technology as far as digital cameras go.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

  3. #3
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    I use a sony DSC-S60 4.1 mpxl camera for my commuter photos. I set it up for VGA/internet so they are already sized for posting. For the family, we have a 5.1 mpxl and a sweet photo printer. Both cameras use the same memory sticks and software. My 4.1 is not as good at close up, but there is a feature that I haven't tried yet that is supposed to be good. I take landscape, commuting, and hooker pictures with it and am amazed at the quality and clarity.
    Retired sailor

  4. #4

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    Canon SD is the way to go

    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan
    Can anyone recommend a digital camera around $300? I am looking for something with a fast shutter speed that will allow cool shots of the local crits, a decent zoom of say 3x or 4x optical, yet is small enough to fit a jersey pocket. I was considering the Cannon SD400 before I read a review of mechanical problems they've been having. The reviewer even flatout warned against buying the SD500 model.

    Any tips or suggestions is greatly appreciated.
    Bryan,
    I just returned from two weeks in Kenya with a Canon SD200, and I'm happy to report that it was a spectacular camera to bring for shots of people and events. I've long been a fan of the Canon Elph line (this coming from a photography/ art minor in college, as well as someone who worked in a high-end B&W lab for a while). While the camera isn't suited to long-distance shots or anything requiring a flash for more than 10 feet away, you can't have everything in a form-factor as small as this.

    The size factor of the Canon is one of it's greatest features- compact with a large screen and 3X zoom- all add up to a solid package from a user standpoint. Add a LONG battery life with great pictures, and you should have few worries.
    A friend on the trip had the SD400, and I ended up using it a good deal (she hadn't read the manual- way to go Selm)- the interface between the two cameras is identical, and she experienced no problems. I also just bought, after owning my SD200 for 8 months, the SD400 for my sister, for her birthday.

    My recommendation- some people prefer Sony gear, however I'm extremely skeptical of their wares these days- any company that has a 90 day warranty and the highest return-rate on its products (their laptops are fashionable pieces of junk) won't get my recommendation. However, I am more than happy to recommend the SD400 (www.pcmall.com usually has the best prices), and BE SURE to get the Ultra 1 Gig SD card from Secure Digital- Secure Digital has reliable hardware that is slightly more expensive, but features higher-grade circuitry (there are different grades of memory), and I recommend the Ultra (high speed) version so that you can do longer video clips, should you choose.

    Remember that you have a 1 year warranty with Canon. I will admit I had a problem with my flash before my trip, but they had the camera back to me within 5 days. I'm confident you will enjoy using this camera, and because its so easy to take everywhere, you'll get a LOT of use out of it.

    ~Nate
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  5. #5
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    Canon SD

    After going through a 30+ year period of film cameras, Contax range finder, Canon range finder, Nikon F family, Nikkormats, Canon A-1's, lenses, motor drives, and ending with a Nikon x90 and lenses, I moved to Europe in 1999 and decided digital was the way to go in order to share pics with family and friends around the World via the internet.

    I've used Nikon digital point and shoots since that time and have shot about 8,000 shots traveling all through Europe during the past 6 years, mostly in cities. Models- The 950, the 990 and now the 4500. Absolutely no reliability problems and all of them are still in use today as I sold the older two to a friend who uses them in his business of appraising leased equipment throughout the UK. They haven't had an easy life and the only thing that has broken was the compact flash flap on the 950, something I knew was going to happen when I first bought it as it was crap then. Nikon fixed the issue in the 990 model. Digital cameras have come a long way and continue to progress at an astounding rate. Also note that makers refine their existing production to improve weaknesses in the basic mechanical features which are prone to failure. Most of the electornic parts either work or don't and generally don't deteriorate over time.

    These are my experiences. Think about what you really need when you're looking for a camera as they've all got various compromises. If you don't care about manual controls/intervention your choices are greater. Most have zoom lenses with a wide angle of 35mm in a 35mm format equivalent. If you're doing a lot of travel shots in close, ie city travel, this is not sufficient. Also, the number of cameras with a wider angle on the zoom is extremely limited. Make sure that the macro setting is there if you have a need and that it's easy to use. Also, battery size and life is a factor although they get better every year.

    Size is another factor. The 950 model was the smallest of the three and I took it everywhere. With each new generation, it got larger and the 4500, while small, cannot be put in your pocket. I bought my wife a Fuji 401 a few years ago. She loves it, it's easy to use and you can put it in your pocket. When I took ride shots in the UK, the Fuji was the camera I slipped in my jersey pocket. That being said, the Fuji has a lense which telescopes into the body when not in use, failed after 2+ years and had to be repaired. Cost was a little over $100 and it took about 3 weeks. My personal take on that was that I wasn't fussed.

    I'm going to Shanghai now for 3 years and currently looking at a new digital camera and currently thinking about a Canon SD400 or SD500. I recently bought an SD300 for my niece's HS graduation. It's a great piece, she loves it and has since taken it to England and Holland where it's performed flawlessly. The Elph line is a proven design (I forget the predecessor line whose mechanics were the forerunner for the Elph) with a large number in use today. Failures happen but not at great frequency. Okay, it doesn't have the wide angle I want but I've been able to live without it in the past and its macro feature is easy to use. SD card prices are now decent and the battery life and charge system are good. Manual controls are barely adequate but sufficient for my needs, construction is reasonably robust and the key for me is its size. Small enough to take anywhere. You can't take the pic if you don't have the camera.

    I don't put too much stock in one or two consumer user reviews where there have been failures provided the product is widely used so I wouldn't shy away from the Canon SD line if that's the case.
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  6. #6
    a Freds Fred
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    I appreciate the input guys. Maybe soon I'll have some cool road reports.

    Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan
    I was considering the Cannon SD400 before I read a review of mechanical problems they've been having.
    I've had an SD400 since last December and have not had any "mechanical" problems at all. Although you don't get the control that you would from a full-featured SLR, its small size gives you no excuse for not having it with you at any time. However, make sure you get a large enough SD card -- I've got a 1 GB card and have never even come close to filling it.
    ---- Perfection is our goal, but excellence is tolerated. ----

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by boneman
    After going through a 30+ year period of film cameras, Contax range finder, Canon range finder, Nikon F family, Nikkormats, Canon A-1's, lenses, motor drives, and ending with a Nikon x90 and lenses, I moved to Europe in 1999 and decided digital was the way to go in order to share pics with family and friends around the World via the internet.
    I was thinking about buying a used Nikon FA or FE to play with - I have an FM-10, their cheap plastic fully-manual SLR, so I have a couple of lenses, flash, filters, remote, etc to work with it. Any suggestions?

    Back to the original thread, I have a friend who's had good luck with her Canon SD camera. I have a Canon A60 (along the lines of the A510), but am having some problems with noisy low-light shots, so I purchased a Nikon D50 this weekend. But six of my friends have other cameras in the A60/A75 family and haven't had any problems.

  9. #9
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    Nikon FA

    Nikon FA's are great cameras. There were some plastic cam parts prone to wear that can be fixed by a good repair shop as they have an impact on the exposure system but otherwise, a fine machine and more sophisticated than the FE series. Excellent-VG FA's are worth seeking out. Lighter than all of the quality auto-focus Nikon SLR bodies due to less parts and more importantly, less battery weight. The Canon A-1 was similar to the Nikon FA and at the time, I had a bunch of Canon lenses so I had 2 bodies and a bunch of lenses when I traveled. I loved non auto-focus cameras as they're lighter and for me, just as easy to use. My Nikon x90 is a great camera, really doesn't suffer the auto-focus heebie jeebies but it weighs a ton. That being said, if you're shooting sports, a full size slr with auto focus and motor drive are the way to go, film back or digital although the Nikon FA with a motor drive would work just fine. Check out KEH camera's site, http://www.keh.com/hmpg/index.cfm. I've dealt with them quite a bit and they're straight up and reliable.


    Quote Originally Posted by GirchyGirchy
    I was thinking about buying a used Nikon FA or FE to play with - I have an FM-10, their cheap plastic fully-manual SLR, so I have a couple of lenses, flash, filters, remote, etc to work with it. Any suggestions?

    Back to the original thread, I have a friend who's had good luck with her Canon SD camera. I have a Canon A60 (along the lines of the A510), but am having some problems with noisy low-light shots, so I purchased a Nikon D50 this weekend. But six of my friends have other cameras in the A60/A75 family and haven't had any problems.
    i've got limited minutes left in life, don't waste my time

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    *** Warning - Long ass post! ***

    Welcome to roadcamerareview.com

    I will recommend Canons also. I have used the following models (although not all extensively). All of them take great pictures when the conditions are easy (no movement/sunlight etc). The quality of pics ie how nice the picture looks is about all equal and indiscernable from each other. And this is coming from a camera retro-grouch (I used to use a full manual Canon FTb).

    - Nikon Coolpix
    - Canon S40/S50
    - Canon SD200ish
    - Canon G- series (G1, G3, G5)
    - Canon A510/520
    - Sony DSC?
    - Various HPs

    Canon
    I like the menu interface (setup/menu) on the Canon series. They all have pretty similar (identical for the S and SD series). I tend to use the manual functions a lot (ajusting ISO speed - Bracketing - light balance), and with the Canon, everything seems to be a couple of menu button away.

    S- series : I would recommend this model (S60) in a heartbeat. Point-and-shoot mode is brainless (on your part not it!) Very easy and does 90% of the job really good. The other 10% is covered by the "auto-special" modes ie Sport/Panorama/Portrait/Nightshot. I love these modes because they are really simple to use and helps with "special" conditions.

    Sport mode forces the camera to use fast shutter speed and fast focusing for sport shots. A good plus for your crit pics. Another plus are the half-manual modes "aperture/speed priority" modes : basically, you fix either the opening of the lens or the speed of the shutter and the CPU takes the picture accordingly. Very nice feature.

    If you are a freak like me, there is the manual mode where you can control both aperture (lens opening), shutter speed and manual focus. The CPU (lightmeter) tells you if you have enough light at those setting. Manual focus is nice because when you needs "fast" shots, you can preset the focus and click for picture. You then remove the "waiting" phase of focusing. Another plus is its compactness, although not tiny like the ELPH or SD series. Minus side : (applies to S40 only not sure on more recent models) Weakish flash, pant pocket-sized and not shirt-pocket sized. You can probably fit 2 SD410 in 1 S40. Switch to "viewing" mode delay was long for 512mb card. My parents SD410 is fast so maybe they fixed that. Filming mode only let you film 30sec on so-called hi-res and 2min on low-res. Again, my folks SD410 can fill till you drop.

    G- series : Same as above but with a bit more frills and better manual ergonomics. Back when I was using this series, they also had a better resolution (megapixel). Honestly, 5 megs is plenty for most folks. Plus side : hotshoe for external flash, interchangeable lens. Minus : Bulky, bigger and not that compact (won't fit in a shirt pocket or pants). Next-best thing to Digital SLRs

    SD- series (SD410): Great point-and-click machine. No frills, and no manual option. Yes they have a few non-auto modes, but no sport mode on the SD410. I have doubt as to it's ability for sport pics. The beauty with Digicams is that you can take a truckload of pictures and cherrypick the best. So you might not really need sport mode. A bit slow focusing (I switched it to fast focus which makes me wonder why there is a "normal" speed) and "weird" image weighing (ie where the CPU will take light readings and focus). These models are very small. It's the one I will take to using on a future ride report. Plus side : filming quality seems a bit better then the S40 (S40 is about 4-5 years older). "View mode" delay is very fast. Very compact.

    A- series (A510) : I fooled around with a friends machine and found it to pretty nice. It's funny that the "lower" end models was pretty good, sometimes better then the higher up. IIRC, it has most of the auto-special modes (night/sport/etc) and manual mode also. The flipside is it's lower resolution and it's not as compact as the S- or SD- series. Don't be fooled tho, 3 mb is plenty for anything but magazine/poster prints. Plus side : price! Very good value.

    Nikon models (coolpix series) : I have found had a bit awkard special mode interface ie I had to dig under menus of menus of menus to get to a function that I wanted. The models I used was also continous focus (constanly looking for a focus point), instead of locking focus. Picture viewing was also a bit slow. Maybe it's just me tho and I don't want to start a nikon vs canon war, so YMMV. II am not a nikon hater tho, I love their DigiSLR, just not their Coolpix models. Minus side : Bulky size.

    Sony models are on par with Canon and I found that sony had a function that automatically resized pictures to 4x6 inch format. Canon's default format is something like 4x6.5 if you resized so it's annoying to lose .5 inches when you bring in to the photomat. Just a mention.

    Parting thoughts (if you've read this far!). Digital zooms are crap, basically you can do the same thing by zooming in any photodoctoring programs. The only camera that accepts external flash are the G- series, and they are $$$ (the flash). Although, for your crits pics, lighting should generally not be a problem. I love to shoot with flash tho. I love Compact Flash memory because they are cheap. Do not confuse "resolution" ie Megapixels and "quality of image". Resolution is basically the size of the picture, not its quality. For 4x6 prints, 3 megs is plenty. I think 5 megs camera take pictures that are about 20x30 inches in real-size. Quality of image depends mainly on the CCD captors and CPU/software they use, and as of yet, I haven't seen a quality digi-pic I did not like! Again this is a great compliment to digicams from someone that loves 'ole-skool film and prints. The real kind!

    I would really recommend the S60 for your usage, I think they are around 225-300$. It's full auto and "auto-modes" are great. And if you fancy a bit more, you can start dabbling in the "aperture/speed" priority modes and manual mode. If you want point and click and compactness, SD- are great. If you have any questions, PM me before I bore everyone here to death!

    Camera geek at your service,
    ColdRider

  11. #11
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    To throw another on the stack, I use a Pentax Optio S5i. I think there are a few more models now but it's a very small camera and takes good photos. 5 megapixel and fits in an Altoid Mint container.

    Just to echo others though, if you end up getting a camera that uses Secure Digital make sure to get a high speed SD card, it does make a difference over the budget cards.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ColdRider
    A- series (A510) : I fooled around with a friends machine and found it to pretty nice. It's funny that the "lower" end models was pretty good, sometimes better then the higher up. IIRC, it has most of the auto-special modes (night/sport/etc) and manual mode also. The flipside is it's lower resolution and it's not as compact as the S- or SD- series. Don't be fooled tho, 3 mb is plenty for anything but magazine/poster prints. Plus side : price! Very good value.
    The A60/75/85/90/510/520 series has Program AE, Shutter Priority, Aperture Priority, and Manual modes in addition to the Auto stuff. They also have manual focus, but the screen doesn't actually show the image focusing - you have to rely on guessing the distance to the object you're photographing. But at least it's there.

    That's why I bought that camera - it's a cheap one with good quality pictures and lots of manual control. You can also change the White Balance, ISO, flash power, and Exposure Compensation. It has a 2-second timer that's handy for night shots.

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    Quote Originally Posted by asterisk
    To throw another on the stack, I use a Pentax Optio S5i. I think there are a few more models now but it's a very small camera and takes good photos. 5 megapixel and fits in an Altoid Mint container.

    Just to echo others though, if you end up getting a camera that uses Secure Digital make sure to get a high speed SD card, it does make a difference over the budget cards.
    Just a bi*ch....I HATE that all the cameras seem to use different memory card formats. My S50 uses compact flash which works well and is cheap. I now have over a gig in various cards and when I'm looking at a new camera I want it to use CF so I can use the same cards.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

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    Quote Originally Posted by GirchyGirchy
    I was thinking about buying a used Nikon FA or FE to play with - I have an FM-10, their cheap plastic fully-manual SLR, so I have a couple of lenses, flash, filters, remote, etc to work with it. Any suggestions?

    Back to the original thread, I have a friend who's had good luck with her Canon SD camera. I have a Canon A60 (along the lines of the A510), but am having some problems with noisy low-light shots, so I purchased a Nikon D50 this weekend. But six of my friends have other cameras in the A60/A75 family and haven't had any problems.
    the FA is a much better camera than the FE.. problem w/ vintage electronic cameras is : they break. there are no parts.
    the FA has a wonderfull meter system and manual focus. it's a beauty..... if you find one in good looking shape, buy it. though, if you are going in the film directionn.. why not a medium format? a rolleiflex?? sturdy, compact, classic, ultra sharp lens, flash sync at all speeds. rolleiflex is the ultimate camera icon: it's still being bought by pros cause we love the rightness of the design. 35mm film cameras lose in sharpnnness dept. to any middle of the road digital camera.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bocephus Jones II
    Just a bi*ch....I HATE that all the cameras seem to use different memory card formats. My S50 uses compact flash which works well and is cheap. I now have over a gig in various cards and when I'm looking at a new camera I want it to use CF so I can use the same cards.
    I know... I started with a low level Kodak with Compact Flash then had to go to Secure Digital... I sold 1.5 gigs worth of CF cards for like 20% argh. It seems like CF is being phased out though as more devices are using SD beyond digicams.

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    Quote Originally Posted by asterisk
    I know... I started with a low level Kodak with Compact Flash then had to go to Secure Digital... I sold 1.5 gigs worth of CF cards for like 20% argh. It seems like CF is being phased out though as more devices are using SD beyond digicams.
    Maybe for point and shoot, but I thought most high end SLR digitals were still CF? Am I wrong? Leave it to the electronics industry to design planned obsolescence into this stuff. Never had that with film cameras.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bocephus Jones II
    Maybe for point and shoot, but I thought most high end SLR digitals were still CF? Am I wrong? Leave it to the electronics industry to design planned obsolescence into this stuff. Never had that with film cameras.
    oh yeah.. you bough a leica, you had a camera for life. the same w/ hasselblads, rolleis and nikons, canons. a 20yr old film camera works like a charm. try that w/ digital.. a top of the line reflex nikon digital of 5yrs a go is a relic. and it wasn't cheap. prices are in the $4000 range. makes any laptop look cheap.
    one thing is amazing w/ digital: it's better than film. right, i said it. main trouble: hoew long will the iamge last? film can go a loooooong time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1
    oh yeah.. you bough a leica, you had a camera for life. the same w/ hasselblads, rolleis and nikons, canons. a 20yr old film camera works like a charm. try that w/ digital.. a top of the line reflex nikon digital of 5yrs a go is a relic. and it wasn't cheap. prices are in the $4000 range. makes any laptop look cheap.
    one thing is amazing w/ digital: it's better than film. right, i said it. main trouble: hoew long will the iamge last? film can go a loooooong time.
    Depends on your def of better, as I really like grain, was bummed when Kodak discontinued their B/W recording film awhile ago....still shoot my 25 yr old A-1 for infrared.......but yeah, digi is nice esp with PS to correct, tweak and bend....I have the 1ds Mark II, and am very happy with it.....

    How long will the image last....depends on how good your archive is......
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1
    the FA is a much better camera than the FE.. problem w/ vintage electronic cameras is : they break. there are no parts.
    the FA has a wonderfull meter system and manual focus. it's a beauty..... if you find one in good looking shape, buy it. though, if you are going in the film directionn.. why not a medium format? a rolleiflex?? sturdy, compact, classic, ultra sharp lens, flash sync at all speeds. rolleiflex is the ultimate camera icon: it's still being bought by pros cause we love the rightness of the design. 35mm film cameras lose in sharpnnness dept. to any middle of the road digital camera.
    I PM'd boneman about this some more last night, so I wouldn't get this thread too off topic. I'm thinking more along the lines of an FM/2/2n after our discussions. I just want a dead simple and reliable manual 35mm SLR with - most importantly - an accurate light meter.

    A medium format would be nice, but I already have lenses and accesories for a Nikon F, and the body's cheaper to begin with. I have an FM-10 now, and just want something more durable and accurate to play with. This'll be my artsy camera run with nothing but B&W film.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by GirchyGirchy
    I PM'd boneman about this some more last night, so I wouldn't get this thread too off topic. I'm thinking more along the lines of an FM/2/2n after our discussions. I just want a dead simple and reliable manual 35mm SLR with - most importantly - an accurate light meter.

    A medium format would be nice, but I already have lenses and accesories for a Nikon F, and the body's cheaper to begin with. I have an FM-10 now, and just want something more durable and accurate to play with. This'll be my artsy camera run with nothing but B&W film.
    Why do you care about the in-camera light meter? Just get a good flash meter and be done with it. That is assuming you are taking artsy fartsy shots anyway and speed isn't of the essence.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

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    Quote Originally Posted by GirchyGirchy
    I PM'd boneman about this some more last night, so I wouldn't get this thread too off topic. I'm thinking more along the lines of an FM/2/2n after our discussions. I just want a dead simple and reliable manual 35mm SLR with - most importantly - an accurate light meter.

    A medium format would be nice, but I already have lenses and accesories for a Nikon F, and the body's cheaper to begin with. I have an FM-10 now, and just want something more durable and accurate to play with. This'll be my artsy camera run with nothing but B&W film.
    the FM has a spotmeter. it tends to overexpose. in BW it's more than fine. acurate exposure is dead critical w/ slides. ugh. i'm relieved i got rid of those. how on earth do i storage slides on a humid city without having fungus all over them in 2/3 yrs? they atract dirt. they are fragile. you need cibachrome to blow up. at the same time... kodachromes have the sharpest image ever!
    another great camera is the F3. electronic but strong. the F2 is perhaps the best mechanical slr ever made.
    i do prefer medium format.. a normal 80mm lens. aaahhh. check irving penn's book: worlds in a small room. now that's black and white.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bocephus Jones II
    Why do you care about the in-camera light meter? Just get a good flash meter and be done with it. That is assuming you are taking artsy fartsy shots anyway and speed isn't of the essence.
    Because a good flash meter costs as much as the camera body. If the camera's is fine, I shouldn't need a seperate one.
    Last edited by GirchyGirchy; 09-08-2005 at 03:54 PM. Reason: whoops! wrong reply.

  23. #23
    Beetpull DeLite
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1
    the FM has a spotmeter. it tends to overexpose. in BW it's more than fine. acurate exposure is dead critical w/ slides. ugh. i'm relieved i got rid of those. how on earth do i storage slides on a humid city without having fungus all over them in 2/3 yrs? they atract dirt. they are fragile. you need cibachrome to blow up. at the same time... kodachromes have the sharpest image ever!
    Thanks for the info. And I agree, slides do make some great prints...I love the colour saturation in Kodachrome.


    i do prefer medium format.. a normal 80mm lens. aaahhh. check irving penn's book: worlds in a small room. now that's black and white.
    One of my friends in Ohio has a medium format setup he'd sell me, but it's still too much for me. If I do go that route, it'll be with a Holga.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1
    the FM has a spotmeter. it tends to overexpose. in BW it's more than fine. acurate exposure is dead critical w/ slides. ugh. i'm relieved i got rid of those. how on earth do i storage slides on a humid city without having fungus all over them in 2/3 yrs? they atract dirt. they are fragile. you need cibachrome to blow up. at the same time... kodachromes have the sharpest image ever!
    another great camera is the F3. electronic but strong. the F2 is perhaps the best mechanical slr ever made.
    i do prefer medium format.. a normal 80mm lens. aaahhh. check irving penn's book: worlds in a small room. now that's black and white.
    Great cameras though I was always a Canon man...I have a Canon F-1 I'm wanting to sell because I never use it anymore. Also a Minolta Flashmeter IV which is (or was) a hell of a meter in it's time. The F-1's metering is pretty accurate AFAIK. Haven't used it in years, but when you put a battery in it works fine. The F-1 is built like a tank. Guess there is still some demand for it as I've searched Ebay and it still brings decent money. Used to do architectural photography at one time. Mostly used the 4x5 for that--if you want to see sharp transparencies look at a 4x5 chrome.
    "I regard the brain as a computer which will stop working when its components fail. There is no heaven or afterlife for broken down computers; that is a fairy story for people afraid of the dark." -S. Hawking

  25. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bocephus Jones II
    Great cameras though I was always a Canon man...I have a Canon F-1 I'm wanting to sell because I never use it anymore. Also a Minolta Flashmeter IV which is (or was) a hell of a meter in it's time. The F-1's metering is pretty accurate AFAIK. Haven't used it in years, but when you put a battery in it works fine. The F-1 is built like a tank. Guess there is still some demand for it as I've searched Ebay and it still brings decent money. Used to do architectural photography at one time. Mostly used the 4x5 for that--if you want to see sharp transparencies look at a 4x5 chrome.
    oh yeah. the canon F1 is a tank. you can use it for self defense. tougher than anything else in phto gear. a friend has one. since i'm a nikon man, i never touched it. movie people like canon lens better than nikon. and a 4 x 5 chrome is obscene... though there is a theory on kodachromes being as sharp as a 4 x5 transparency. i never used much kodachrome cause they were never available in south america. something about their need of industrial lab x ektachrome home lab needs.
    www.flaviocolker.com.br
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