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  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by love4himies View Post
    Replacement seats are expensive, but I feel your pain and the price of them is well worth it. I bought a Corbin for my Vulcan S and LOVE it. I can't believe the difference in comfort. Mustang makes one for your bike as well.
    When I started cycling Selle Italia Turbos were kinda the standard for cycling seats. I never got used to them. Then I found a $5 San Marco Regal at a veloswap and now it's the only saddle I use (they are also pricey).

    My BIL's touring BMW has a Corbin seat and he swears by it. Can your ride comfortably for long distances with your Corbin without any discomfort? My new seat feels better than stock but after some miles I feel the need to "re-position" my butt cheeks from time to time (no more pain in my coccyx). I don't know if this is because of being stuck in one riding position or not.
    You'd think we were here for something other than fun. - Ishmael

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP View Post
    When I started cycling Selle Italia Turbos were kinda the standard for cycling seats. I never got used to them. Then I found a $5 San Marco Regal at a veloswap and now it's the only saddle I use (they are also pricey).

    My BIL's touring BMW has a Corbin seat and he swears by it. Can your ride comfortably for long distances with your Corbin without any discomfort? My new seat feels better than stock but after some miles I feel the need to "re-position" my butt cheeks from time to time (no more pain in my coccyx). I don't know if this is because of being stuck in one riding position or not.
    Motorcycling requires frequent stops to stretch the legs. The stock seat on my Vulcan S was horrible and am now able to ride for longer periods without pain. Some riders get "Highway pegs" on their crash bars to enable them to stretch out their legs while riding on the highway. Hubby or I are not tall enough to require those.
    While we are free to choose our actions, we are not free to choose the consequences of our actions. - Stephen R. Covey.

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveRider View Post
    I had never ridden a motorcycle until recently. I'm 43. My wife bought a 150 cc Bajaj a few months ago. It looks like a crotch rocket but the position is more upright. She still can't ride it. I got the hang of it but I do not like it. After riding bicycles for so long, motorcycles feel heavy & dead. And it's too much multitasking with all the controls plus looking out for idiot drivers. Not for me.
    scooters always make more sense other than they usually have too small gas tanks for road tripping.

    Been riding moto off and on for 30 years now. 2 years ago I was riding a 600CBR and picked up a 250 Piaggio. The scooter just made sense and got used, and the CBR just sat. So much less noise and vibration, upright seating, no gears, more efficient, a real fairing etc. Though I'd scrape the centre stand while cornering in the many twisty roads here
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker View Post
    scooters always make more sense other than they usually have too small gas tanks for road tripping.
    There was a day when a scooter was a Vespa, and they all were about the same. That's not so true anymore. Some scooters have much bigger wheels and bigger engines, so they are basically automatic transmission motorcycles. For instance, the Burgman 650



    I've never been a fan, as they appear to be mostly geared for zipping around a city with lots of stop and go, at low speeds.

    I own street legal dirt and adventure motorcycles that can handle unpaved mountain roads, which is where I mostly ride - i.e. in the middle of nowhere, where there's also usually almost no cars. I have a DRZ-400S and V-Strom DL-650.

  5. #155
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    The DRZ-400S with knobbies can handle some pretty nasty rocky roads.


  6. #156
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    Hopefully you guys register them and have visible plates.. a lot of tools in my area with street legal dirt bikes, but never registered them and have no plates and have a tendency to do stupid **** (DC MD VA area). Not saying all, but a good number of them.

    Sadly, we don't have too many places to take bikes offroad, I think Shenandoah Nat Park is the closest if memory serves me. Use to ave Greenridge too, but they killed that off during a gov shutdown and never came back.

  7. #157
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    Sadly.. my wife is firmly in the "I will divorce you" category if I come home with a bike.. which is really stupid.. because the roads I use to commute to work (if it was not a 45 mile commute I would cycle it) in a car are also the same ones I would use with the motorcycle. And lets be fair, you are probably safer on a MC then on a bicycle (well assuming you don't ride like a tool.. lane splitting is not legal yet.. although there are no laws in DC for or against it.. grey area, but they are trying to make it legal)

    Simple fact for me, same roads.. MC would probably be safer.. even tried the getting a bike with all the safety features (one of the reasons I picked the Triumph Street or Speed Triples, and the Aprilia Tuono, both have all the std ABS, Traction control, ride modes etc, but also have cornering ABS, not to many have that currently), and airbag clothing.. even upped my insurance through my company (can do # of years * salary, I I work in IT security as a consultant, for 11 years.... I'm worth more dead than alive )...

    And she still threatened divorce lol

  8. #158
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    Decisions, Decisions.
    I have a kawa KLX 350 for my dirt work and a BMW Xcountry set up as a super moto for more pavement. But I live way out in AZ.
    Like I said, Decisions, Decisions.
    BANNED

  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljvb View Post
    Hopefully you guys register them and have visible plates.. a lot of tools in my area with street legal dirt bikes, but never registered them and have no plates and have a tendency to do stupid **** (DC MD VA area). Not saying all, but a good number of them.

    Sadly, we don't have too many places to take bikes offroad, I think Shenandoah Nat Park is the closest if memory serves me. Use to ave Greenridge too, but they killed that off during a gov shutdown and never came back.
    Both my rides are plated, inspected, insured. That's the point, so you can legally ride them to where you want to play. Around me, I need to go 10-30 miles to find the mountains, so usually plan all back road routes.
    I don't ride in places designated off road vehicles only. I ride on public roads, many of which are closed in winter. And in nice weather are barely passable by 4WD Jeeps. Many are old logging roads that are barely maintained, in the middle of nowhere. These are pretty common anywhere there is steep rugged terrain.
    For me that means Vermont, Western MA, and NY east and north of Albany.

  10. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by config View Post
    I would encourage you to get a "beater" bike to master things first before getting your dream bike. As it's been mentioned several times; "There are 2 types of riders, those who've been down and those who are going down".
    Ocuh! I'm glad I got bought my BIL 97 Shadow. Today I went down for the first time. Long story short, I went in too hot into a curve. Countersteered hard. Heard and felt my floorboards scrapping the pavement and panicked. I was drifting over the double yellow line. Instead of riding through the countersteering I grabbed both brakes and crashed into the side of a mountain.

    I'm glad the only smart thing I do while riding a motorcycle is wear all the gear. Not a scratch on me person (just some charlie horses on my thigh and shoulder. Will probably feel worst tomorrow morning), two new dents on the gas tank and my throttle side handlebar is bent upwards abit.
    You'd think we were here for something other than fun. - Ishmael

  11. #161
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    I am so sorry to hear that JaeP, it must have been terrifying. As long as you are OK, that's all that matters, the bike can be fixed. I crossed the centre line once when I first started, thank goodness there wasn't any vehicles coming, and now I take the corners easy. As my instructor taught me: leave something in reserve while riding.
    While we are free to choose our actions, we are not free to choose the consequences of our actions. - Stephen R. Covey.

  12. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeP View Post
    Ocuh! I'm glad I got bought my BIL 97 Shadow. Today I went down for the first time. Long story short, I went in too hot into a curve. Countersteered hard. Heard and felt my floorboards scrapping the pavement and panicked. I was drifting over the double yellow line. Instead of riding through the countersteering I grabbed both brakes and crashed into the side of a mountain.

    I'm glad the only smart thing I do while riding a motorcycle is wear all the gear. Not a scratch on me person (just some charlie horses on my thigh and shoulder. Will probably feel worst tomorrow morning), two new dents on the gas tank and my throttle side handlebar is bent upwards a bit.
    The value of wearing that equipment can't be overstated. (As you now if not before well know!) Glad you are generally OK.

  13. #163
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    Motorbikes

    Hi man

    the bike you are considering is a monster in wheels - a sure shortcut to the grave for a beginner like you.

    Start learning walking before running. In my days, the path to double the cc.
    Begin with a 125cc to learn all the tricks of the trade then get a 250cc to master the more power bit then a 500cc and lastly a 750/1000cc.

    Might sound old school, but in my eyes the safest.

    Quote Originally Posted by DrSmile View Post
    So I can't afford a new sports car, and all my friends who ride motorcycles have been crippled... BUT

    One of them bought a Kawasaki ZX14R and it's just so much better and faster than anything I've ever seen, it seems like a better buy than a sports car.

    Only problem is I really don't know how to ride a motorcycle, so I'd have to take the classes, buy all the accoutrements like leathers, helmet, etc, and of course I'd have to work my way up to the beast that is the Ninja (friends are suggesting a used 600).

    Any advice on doing this, or should I just ride my bicycle faster?

  14. #164
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    I have wanted to buy an Royal Enfield for a while but I would not have time to ride it too may other things to do. Had a think about it and have a work car don't ride my bikes enough afternoons are pretty much full so no point still want one though

  15. #165
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    If youíve got good scan and read of traffic, the situational awareness doesnít differ much from road bike riding. Thereís less speed disparity in traffic on a motorcycle (if you choose so) but youíre still non-existent to many drivers. Many scan for car-width conflicts, and you donít register.

    Iím used to being invisible on two wheels and not shocked when cars pull in my path. I feel like there are more options on a motorcycle just because I can pick my place on the road and be there with a slight throttle twist. I can also use other cars as blockers at intersections and position myself to be seen better compared to the speed and lane position limitations I have on a road bike.

    For those who are not set on a cruiser, the 300/400 class of parallel twins (usually, but not always in sport bike clothes) are ideal for city commuting and spirited riding on the open road. Docile around town if your right hand wants, no overheating, and banshees past 9K rpm.

    I guess it's also worth mentioning that you will probably become a better cyclist by learning two-wheel physics in the higher performance envelope of the motorcycle. Catching a side wind at high speed on a sport bike is often more eye-opening than the same crosswind on a 15-pound bicycle.

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