Is it ok NOT to like New York City ? - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 66
  1. #26
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,830
    Quote Originally Posted by SystemShock View Post
    Some ppl in the US actually just ARE nice, believe it or not.

    Not all, but some.

    Don't be so jaded, man. Save that crap for when you visit Germany or France, it'll help you blend in.
    .
    I'd state that MOST people in the US are always polite and friendly. NYC'ers get a bad rap for not being either. I think the super frenzied pace of life in the city that never sleeps, tend towards folks that live here don't feel they have the time to be open and friendly to everybody.

    As well, NYC is a city with a super varied population from many different cultures. That tends to make people assume that somebody that looks different IS different and not somebody to trust, socialize with, be friendly too, etc.... A lot of urban areas might have diversity but not to the extent of NYC, though LA maybe. And when you get out of the urban centers of the US many people come from similar cultural backgrounds - or have over the decades, though this is now changing as the country changes, thus there might be a preponderance of people that look like you do and then the assumption is they are like you and that tends to make for a more friendly and trusting interaction.

    Think Iowa (or a lot of the midwest and northern midwest), all blonde haired people, with the restaurant scene with Jerry and father-in-law from the movie Fargo coming to mind. The Cohen Bros. nailed it that the politeness can sometimes be surface only with that underlying tension easily coming to the surface. That politeness is typically underlying in NYC and does come to the surface when needed.

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: troutmd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    23,675


    But Catalonia has captured my heart.
    I am 100% convinced the internet and social media are not the salvation to human civility.

  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,080
    Quote Originally Posted by azpeterb View Post
    I just wonder why the ďnational media ď is so fixated on the likes of the Mets, the Jets, the Giants and the Knicks. Dang those teams suck! I donít care a ratís ass about them and I wish the east-coast-biased sports media would squawk about some other teams that deserve the coverage.
    Its just economic bias... Every league wants NY and LA or SF or other monster size markets in its championship games. Rutgers vs South Florida was one of the highest rated regular season football games ever... Empire State Building was lit up scarlet. Itís what got us invited to join the B10. Itís just a massive viewer market. The SMPSA (standard metropolitan population statistical area) of NYC dwarfs LA.

    One of my my best friends went to Carnegie Mellon in Pittsburgh. One night in a bar he overheard a group of guys trashing NYC. He went and said to them, ďIím from NYC, and I can tell you one thing with absolute certainty about it. No where in the entire city is there a group of guys sitting around trashing Pittsburgh.Ē
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  4. #29
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Christine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    15,389
    Of course it's awesome with so much to explore. But anything artsy or local has been priced out, so anything that appears to be an original one-off is actually part of a bigger chain. The gentrification is hitting Queens and already hit Brooklyn- the little Marine Park house my father grew up in is worth almost $1 million now, wtf.

    When I got my third bike ticket, and was told that any subsequent ticket would be in the $700 range, that's when I started to hate the city. It's great for occasional splurging, but the middle class and below can barely get by. They mayor is too busy running for president to care.

    Still a lot of fun, love taking visitors around, glad the house is a great investment so far, but I'm really soured on biking around anymore, which is painful.

    I do love the efficiency and directness (which is often misconstrued as "rudeness" or "attitude.") Some residents think living here gives them a free pass to be a$$h0les, but they're wrong. Ask a NYer for directions, or lose your wallet, good chance you'll get help.

    (The whole "9/11 made me realize how amazing NYC is" comments are just disturbing, though- wtf does that even mean?? I don't know why this bothers me. There are still more good than evil humans no matter where you go.)

  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    319
    Only been there once as a kid during the Worlds Fair. Been across it various times (Amtrak Penn Sta or GW Bridge). Neither like it nor dislike it and no one here cares if I do or don't so it's plenty OK. Now if someone asks if you do or don't like Waikiki (or Vegas aka the 8th island), that's something else.

    scott s.
    .

  6. #31
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,080
    Quote Originally Posted by scott967 View Post
    Only been there once as a kid during the Worlds Fair. Been across it various times (Amtrak Penn Sta or GW Bridge). Neither like it nor dislike it and no one here cares if I do or don't so it's plenty OK. Now if someone asks if you do or don't like Waikiki (or Vegas aka the 8th island), that's something else.

    scott s.
    .
    You couldn't pay me to live in Waikiki. I read an article asking disaster management professionals to list their top 5 places they wouldnít live? All of them listed Hawaii first. Good luck bro.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  7. #32
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Oxtox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    10,363
    Quote Originally Posted by scott967 View Post
    Now if someone asks if you do or don't like Waikiki (or Vegas aka the 8th island), that's something else.
    Vegas...?

    what an utter craphole.
    Ancient Astronaut theorists say, 'YES!'

  8. #33
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    833
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    You couldn't pay me to live in Waikiki. I read an article asking disaster management professionals to list their top 5 places they wouldnít live? All of them listed Hawaii first. Good luck bro.
    Disaster management professionals in Hawaii? Yeah, that's gotta suck. Want something brought in? That's from 3,000 miles away. Want to send something out? Gotta go 3,000 miles. Volcanoes can be a b!tch sometimes too. And they're actually in an Earthquake zone. Tsunamis? That's like Radiation Specialists saying working at Chernobyl sucks because of all of the overtime.

  9. #34
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    609
    I grew up in north Jersey, @ 15 miles away, and couldn't leave fast enough. As the great great grand child of immigrants, I have long family histories in Manhattan and Brooklyn. I get to NYC every once in a while now, but I don't have any family ties in the area any longer. As an experience, NYC is obviously unique, and provides opportunities you can't find elsewhere. If you have fat stacks of cash, it would be a fun place to live, especially since you could leave whenever you'd like. However, all of the things that it's great at aren't of interest to me, I wouldn't miss it if I never go back. Different strokes and all that.

  10. #35
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nealric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    5,264
    I never liked NYC much before I moved there. Ended up moving there semi against my will (only place I found a good job offer). I'm glad I lived there for a while. There were good experiences and bad. I actually appreciate it much more when visiting. It's a place of contradictions.

    I don't think people who dislike NYC are nearly as much of a minority as they think they are. Heck, even politicians like to knock on NYC and other major East Coast cities because it's just good politics. But because it's such a major cultural center, it means that so much entertainment is centered around it so it kind of infects the culture regardless.

    That said, you couldn't pay me enough to move back there. The expense and petty frustrations (just getting groceries can be a struggle) are not worth it. Well you probably could pay me enough, but it would be a LOT more than I am worth!

  11. #36
    Devoid of all flim-flam
    Reputation: Mapei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    7,090
    I've only visited NYC a few times. I liked the energy, attitude and the variety & quality of the stuff that can part you from your money (live acts, food), but I have to say I like a raft of cities much, much more. And yeah, the boosterism that expatriate New Yorkers lay on you can get pretty thick (I've gotten sick of asking them why they moved away), but then again almost everybody seems to want to boost their home turf. ...Everybody, that is, except for people from New Jersey.
    Last edited by Mapei; 1 Week Ago at 02:57 PM. Reason: clarity
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  12. #37
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,080
    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    I've only visited NYC a few times. I liked the energy, attitude and the variety & quality of the stuff that can part you from your money (live acts, food), but I have to say I like a raft of cities much, much more. And yeah, the boosterism that expatriate New Yorkers lay on you can get pretty thick (I've gotten sick of asking them why they moved away), but then again almost everybody seems to want to boost their home turf. ...Everybody, that is, except for people from New Jersey.
    Haha! Come visit the Jersey Shore! Itís beautiful! And itís only minutes from sprawling horse farms. One of our local public schools was ranked number 1 in the nation last year. We are the most educated (and hardest working) state in the USA. I live a mile from the 2nd highest concentration of wealth in the US behind Beverly Hills. I ride through those winding hilly country roads all the time. You can ride with a fair amount of traffic but people are pretty respectful of cyclists. There is tremendous colonial history everywhere. I grew up on a farm first established in 1732. I live in the woods on an acre and a half 8 miles from Wall St. There is nothing I donít have access to. Full Broadway casts come to our local theaters. The fine art is top tier with Endowment for the Arts Fellows showing regularly. I donít know if I could live happily outside a culture rich environment. And if it isnít available locally, I can go into ďThe CityĒ and bam. We have 4 seasons, tremendous leaf seasons and rare natural disasters. We have plenty of water. NJ has an incredible food scene and our diners are affordable! And, lastly, we have the best pizza in the world.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  13. #38
    Sweet Potato Kugel
    Reputation: Eretz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,130
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    ... And, lastly, we have the best pizza in the world.
    And the Pine Barrens. My Favourite. We're CT [Rowayton CT] and love the Pinelands.

    https://blog.funnewjersey.com/best-p...nations-in-nj/
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together

  14. #39
    Devoid of all flim-flam
    Reputation: Mapei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    7,090
    Pardon me for insulting your fair state.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  15. #40
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: nayr497's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,399
    Both of my parents were born in Brooklyn. I grew up in upstate NY but traveled to NYC as as a child all the time to visit family, see the holiday parades, tour the city. It was cool, as a kid from the suburbs. These days you couldn't pay me to live in a big city. I was in SF for work earlier this year and was overwhelmed by the noise, garbage, and sheer number of homeless &/or mentally ill people.

    I live in a city of around 250,000, though it is suddenly exploding in popularity and population.

    Oh, and don't get me started on people from NYC saying "New York" when they mean one of the five boroughs. Ugh, get over yourselves, folks. New York is a big state, borders another nation, has two Great Lakes, many Finger Lakes, two huge rivers, etc. This is even WORSE when it is someone from some place like say IN who has moved to NYC and they suddenly start saying they're "from" New York and they aren't AND they mean they live in Queens and have never been past of Nassau or Westchester.

  16. #41
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,644
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    And, lastly, we have the best pizza
    Is it ok NOT to like New York City ?-maxresdefault.jpg
    I'm sure you expected argument over that from NYC-ers and surrounding towns.

    in the world.
    Besides having pizza while I lived in NYC, I've tried pizza in southern Connecticut as well. They are really good. Also, I've tried pizze in Italy. They are really really good.

  17. #42
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Akirasho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,342
    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    And, lastly, we have the best pizza in the world.
    Ö this is also one of them arguments outta Chi Town, but...









    Their thick crust tastes like what the rest of you think pizza is.

    addendum: they are NOT cheap, rarely offer specials, and will now be dinner for me.

  18. #43
    Devoid of all flim-flam
    Reputation: Mapei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    7,090
    Someday, try the Pizzeria Brandi in Naples, Italy or the Pizzeria Baffetto in Rome.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  19. #44
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: BCSaltchucker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,034
    I like NYC as an idealized fantasy for a place I will never actually visit. Unlike Paris which is like being in a fantasy while actually visiting.
    Faith is pretending to know things you don't know

  20. #45
    Sweet Potato Kugel
    Reputation: Eretz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,130
    Last edited by Eretz; 1 Week Ago at 05:16 PM.

  21. #46
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,080
    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    Pardon me for insulting your fair state.
    No offense taken my friend, we are used to it. We are actually very diverse for such a small state. As Eretz says, the Pine Barrens are so cool, a completely unique ecosystem! Original home of the blueberry and cranberry. Amazing fat biking! Lots of sugar sand like the beach. Low pine scrub goes on forever making staying oriented really, really important. The northwest looks like Vermont and the climate is surprisingly close to similar! Appalachian Trail goes through there... Central has the highlands (where I am) and south has vast marshes and inland waterways. Amazing birding. I was driving 20í behind on Osprey at slightly above windshield level on my drive home from work today. I am biased, I have bay water in my veins... I love the vast marshes. I see Bald Eagles regularly in my local marshes. We are the ďGarden StateĒ and I live in the heart of the garden, where farms fed the barges that fed NYC for centuries, and still do!

    As for pizza... I havenít been to Italy despite having a family estate there, in Monte Casino... But if you ever find yourself at the Jersey Shore, find Pete and Eldaís. You will find your way back again... And almost every argument will be closed.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  22. #47
    Sweet Potato Kugel
    Reputation: Eretz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,130
    Last edited by Eretz; 1 Week Ago at 05:14 PM.

  23. #48
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 9W9W's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    2,658
    28 years in NYC. Wife and I hate it here and are planning our escape. Die hard new yorkers who enjoyed it much more than we have in the last decade are also giving up and planning their escape. At some point in my 30's I woke up said, what the f---- am I doing here? Wife and I have a saying, life happens everywhere. It's so hard to see, believe and act on this as someone who has lived here for so long.

    NYC sucks. Queens, Brooklyn and especially Long Island sucks. NJ sucks, for riding and prop taxes. The region is increibly expensive and perhaps your generation is different, but mine is basically people following their parents playbook without realizing the rules have changed (at least locally in terms of housing inflation, congestion, relative distances to work, commute times, etc).

    Halp!
    "That pretty much sums it up. I'm 43 and my max is ~178-180. If that HR chart was mine or Froome's, we'd be on the verge of death. But for you it probably looks like a normal workout." -TLG

    LOLOLOL

  24. #49
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: PBL450's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,080
    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    28 years in NYC. Wife and I hate it here and are planning our escape. Die hard new yorkers who enjoyed it much more than we have in the last decade are also giving up and planning their escape. At some point in my 30's I woke up said, what the f---- am I doing here? Wife and I have a saying, life happens everywhere. It's so hard to see, believe and act on this as someone who has lived here for so long.

    NYC sucks. Queens, Brooklyn and especially Long Island sucks. NJ sucks, for riding and prop taxes. The region is increibly expensive and perhaps your generation is different, but mine is basically people following their parents playbook without realizing the rules have changed (at least locally in terms of housing inflation, congestion, relative distances to work, commute times, etc).

    Halp!
    Long Island sucks. Jersey is expensive. It def doesnít suck. The northeast quartile sucks. Get west or get south of ďthe bridgeĒ and itís a whole different state. There is a reason it is most affluent state in the nation. But yes, it is expensive as hell to live here. Flip side? My nephew went to the best high school in the country and itís public. We have family moving more south Jersey and into Delaware, when we are there we think it would be nice to reduce our cost of living! Then you realize every restaurant is a chain and there is zero culture. ZERO! It goes from cultured to Mayberry in a split second. F*ck Olive Garden! And people go there and they donít know! Around me most people are some combination Italian, Irish and Jewish. And the overlap is something enjoyed and appreciated not feared or diminished. People embrace and appreciate cultural differences... Hey, itís your own family...
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  25. #50
    Sweet Potato Kugel
    Reputation: Eretz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,130
    ^^^What he said.
    Last edited by Eretz; 1 Week Ago at 11:14 PM.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. New York Times Portland Bike City
    By lookrider in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-05-2007, 10:11 PM
  2. New York City team looking for riders
    By trener1 in forum Racing, Training, Nutrition, Triathlons
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-21-2007, 06:18 AM
  3. New York Times, April 28th "The City"
    By RoyIII in forum Fixed/Single Speed
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-29-2007, 11:03 AM
  4. I've left my heart in New York City!!!!
    By ashpelham in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 12-20-2006, 06:40 PM
  5. We Non-Cycle in New York City.
    By MB1 in forum Commuting, Touring and Ride Reports
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-28-2005, 06:53 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.