Is it ok NOT to like New York City ? - Page 3
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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by PBL450 View Post
    My nephew went to the best high school in the country and itís public. We have family moving more south Jersey and into Delaware, when we are there we think it would be nice to reduce our cost of living! Then you realize every restaurant is a chain and there is zero culture. ZERO! It goes from cultured to Mayberry in a split second. F*ck Olive Garden! And people go there and they donít know! Around me most people are some combination Italian, Irish and Jewish. And the overlap is something enjoyed and appreciated not feared or diminished. People embrace and appreciate cultural differences... Hey, itís your own family...
    The idea that there's culture here is laughable. Living in Europe, now that's experiencing and embracing "culture"! Being able to get amazing Pho at 2AM is not culture, even more so when you have to stand in traffic behind people who chuck cigarette butts out the window (or take crumbling, urine soaked public transport) on your way to "culture". That's not culture, or at least not the type of culture I'm looking to instill.

    I went to a specialized high school that is routinely top 100 of schools nationwide (there are some 25,000) which I attended after passing a rigorous entrance exam. I am curious to learn which school your nephew attended.

    Perhaps you're one of those low IQ rough necks collecting a fat Cadillac pension and asking future generations for ~ $1MM for your run down pos 50's run down dwelling. In which case I can see how NYC would be paradise (can't possibly swing anything elsewhere) but if you think not patronizing Olive Garden = cultural enrichment; well, I can see how we view things differently.

    To recap: It's needlessly expensive. There are much better places to live and still experience culture (smaller town next to international airport) where one can enjoy culture without the bs we've all been conditioned to accept here.
    Last edited by 9W9W; 1 Week Ago at 08:48 AM.
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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    Attachment 325079
    I'm sure you expected argument over that from NYC-ers and surrounding towns.


    Besides having pizza while I lived in NYC, I've tried pizza in southern Connecticut as well. They are really good. Also, I've tried pizze in Italy. They are really really good.
    Why people is so obsessed with NYC Pizza ???? even my mom is crazy about it...and we live in italy !! Cmon where is the good pizza in NYC ? Honestly I find it the usual mediocre Wholefoodish/Sbarroish crap no matter where you go..

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    Being able to get amazing Pho at 2AM is not culture
    Lots of wisdom in that statement.
    Based on my experience I'd have to guess you are in the minority being a long time New Yorker that still gets that.

    I live in Boston and we have a lot of that attitude too. In the minds of some getting fresh fish and good Italian sauce in restaurants is just so fabulous. But going fishing and growing tomatoes and basil in your own garden is for country folk and of no cultural value.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Cmon where is the good pizza in NYC ?
    Here: https://www.thrillist.com/eat/new-yo...-new-york-city

    Honestly I find it the usual mediocre Wholefoodish/Sbarroish crap no matter where you go..
    If you are used to pizza from the originating places, the ones on the other side of the pond may taste "watered down". I've tried hamburger in Urbino, Italia. It was OK but wasn't quite there. It tasted as if one little thing was missing but hard to describe in words.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    Why people is so obsessed with NYC Pizza ???? even my mom is crazy about it...and we live in italy !! Cmon where is the good pizza in NYC ? Honestly I find it the usual mediocre Wholefoodish/Sbarroish crap no matter where you go..
    The best NYC pizza I've had is in Westfield NJ and Ocean City NJ.

  6. #56
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    This is a brilliant read on someone who met head on the "culture" of NYC vs the world.

    I have a couple copies, PM me or get it on Amazon. The first chapter, Thomas P.F. Hoving is the red meat of culture in NYC.




    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas P.F. Hoving the creator of the Playscapes
    Snip
    PROFILE of Thomas P. F. Hoving, the former N. Y. C. Commissioner of Parks and now the Director of the Metropolitan Museum. In '59, when Homing was a graduate student in art history at Princeton, he gave a lecture at the annual symposium at the Frick Collection, on certain antique aources of the Annibale Carracci frescoes in the Farnese Gallery, in Rome. After the lecture, a man unknown to Hoving, came up to him and asked if in his work on the Farnese Gallery,he had encountered records of a large 16th century marble table inlaid with semiprecious stones that had once been in the gallery. Hoving had no recollection of it. The man then took him to the Director's office at the Metropolitan Museum to show him the table. The man was James J. Rorimer, then the Director of the Museum. Later that year Hoving went to work for the Museum. He soon became a curatorial assistant in the Museum's Medieval Dept. at the Cloisters. Tells about his work there, field trips to Europe with Rorimer in search of treasures. Hoving went to the May 1966 board meeting of the Museum as a trustee ex officio, a position he held as Parks Commissioner. Hoving remembers that Rorimer was in great form that day, full of vivacity and jokes. He died that night, while he slept.
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
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  7. #57
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    Ads block reading. Would like to read the url though.


    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    If you are used to pizza from the originating places, the ones on the other side of the pond may taste "watered down". I've tried hamburger in Urbino, Italia. It was OK but wasn't quite there. It tasted as if one little thing was missing but hard to describe in words.
    Very true. In Connecticut someone mentioned good pizza. I live here, Norwalk South. Up the road Frank Pepe, been around for 90 years. As for "hamburger" Louis Lunch is an oldie in New Haven, CT since 1895.

    We have a place up in Syracuse, NY called Mario and Salvo's [Salvo Barbarino and Mario Di Marco]. After 5 years ordering from them while at UpState, they were the cold shouldered silent guys with little conversation. A month ago I said the word, "Brooklyn." That started a lengthy conversation of where they got started, were raised and family was from ...and that's the difficult part of homage. One of my favourite neighborhoods was always Brooklyn. So now they're noted as MY GREATS.
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9W9W View Post
    The idea that there's culture here is laughable. Living in Europe, now that's experiencing and embracing "culture"! Being able to get amazing Pho at 2AM is not culture, even more so when you have to stand in traffic behind people who chuck cigarette butts out the window (or take crumbling, urine soaked public transport) on your way to "culture". That's not culture, or at least not the type of culture I'm looking to instill.

    I went to a specialized high school that is routinely top 100 of schools nationwide (there are some 25,000) which I attended after passing a rigorous entrance exam. I am curious to learn which school your nephew attended.

    Perhaps you're one of those low IQ rough necks collecting a fat Cadillac pension and asking future generations for ~ $1MM for your run down pos 50's run down dwelling. In which case I can see how NYC would be paradise (can't possibly swing anything elsewhere) but if you think not patronizing Olive Garden = cultural enrichment; well, I can see how we view things differently.

    To recap: It's needlessly expensive. There are much better places to live and still experience culture (smaller town next to international airport) where one can enjoy culture without the bs we've all been conditioned to accept here.
    Damn. You are bitter and shot out. Run away now to save yourself. Oh, and different isnít cultured. You have no clue. Europe is cultured because why? Because itís European? Are you a bigot? It kind of sounds like it? Just saying... White Europeans are what culture is? Ouch. Iím glad Iím not you. Whatever you say, the Met is the greatest manmade place on earth. White people who live in Europe do not embody culture to me. They are a piece of culture. One small piece. Places like Persia and the Far East have massive cultural treasures. And you know what? In my experience, I can get up close and personal with those contributions locally or just a ferry ride away. Yes, I see culture as fine art, theater, food scene... But, at its core, it is the people that live in very different places, like you say, but I would be aghast to consider that restricted to white Europeans! This part of the world has upside and downside like every other part of the world. If you hate it, leave.
    To date, philosophers have merely interpreted the world in various ways. The point however is to change it.

  9. #59
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    Forgive me for being shallow. When it comes to major cities, I just like Paris. I just like Rome. I just like L.A. I just don't like NYC. I'm not a fan of S.F. either.
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eretz View Post
    Ads block reading. Would like to read the url though.
    I have ad blocker but showed all the list (there are many).

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mapei View Post
    ...When it comes to major cities, I just like Paris. ...Snip
    My daughters do too. I have photos of them young on the balcony in 75116. There are three different morning, afternoon and evening boulangeries for bread. And a short stroll to Ave Foch.


  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvber View Post
    I have ad blocker but showed all the list (there are many).
    Got it. Went to Edge.
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together

  13. #63
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    When I was a kid, a new market opened nearby. Aside from the usual market fare, this market was prolly the first in the area to offer fresh seafoods (lobster, halibut, shrimp, etc) exotic fruits (kiwi, mango, plantains) as well as a full service bakery on site... now, every Krogers or Meijers has the same.

    When I was a kid, we traveled to the Bay Area (Oakland) and was exposed to Asian cuisine (egg drop soup was mind altering). What medium sized city in the US isn't flooded with some form of Asia, be it Thai, Chinese or Japanese (as a military town, we've got great Vietnamese and Korean cuisine in addition to a schlemeal load of varied Indian curries).

    When I was a kid, we'd see plays, dance troupes and orchestral performances on a 12" B&W screen. Today, we have a couple world class museums, a great Philharmonic (along with a world class venue) and several award winning dance companies.

    My point is, a lot of amenities that made a metropolis like NYC a must see a few decades ago is available on mainstreet USA. The full Monty NYC version of "The Lion King" (seen on a family visit a few years ago on Broadway) was put on at the abovementioned local world class venue a year or two ago. Most of us no longer need that verse from a famous WWI era song "How ya gonna keep 'em down on the farm, after they've seen Paree?"

  14. #64
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    Great Post ^^^


    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together

  15. #65
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    All things considered, I'd rather be in Philadelphia.

  16. #66
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    ^ Cheese wit or cheese wit-out?

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