Is it ok NOT to like New York City ?
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  1. #1
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    Is it ok NOT to like New York City ?

    So,it looks like I may be the only person in the world that does not like New York City,I'm talking about Manhattan.
    Every time I say that in a social setting I'm automatically labeled as some sort of monster or freak.
    I've been to the big apple about 4/5 times,except the very first time none of the other trips happened because I wanted to go there but rather because somehow I've had to. Like I was leaving the USA after a trip and made NYC as a last spot to visit because I was with somebody that never been there,or when I was living in San Francisco I've met over there with my parents and friends visiting. I've even had some local friend of mine helping me discover the city off the touristy thing but nothing,zero,nada,the spark was not there,period.
    Now don't get me wrong, it is the most amazing city in the world, you really feel like you are in the world's belly, but what I do think about NYC is that it's too much NYC,too much of everything. The coziness of the thing is totally lost there. Also,like the rest of the USA,it seems to me that the touristy or residential areas like Hudson Yards are basically turning into fancy shopping malls you can find everywhere. Neiman Marcus,Tiffany,Gap,GNC, pizza this and burger that..so boring. Times Square ? the most dreadful place on earth imho.
    You may think I'm crazy but on the opposite I love Los Angeles and Las Vegas ( not because of the Strip..)
    And if you compare London to New York City sorry, New York City can't stand a chance.
    But the thing is it looks like there's stigma towards those who don't like the city. Of course there are some parts,some details of the island I do actually love,like the frozen january winds around Battery Park and the dramatic skyscrapers, but ehy...it all ends there to me. The subway,the tourists,the constant amount of people walking,rushing around....no thanks.
    Last edited by Devastazione; 3 Weeks Ago at 04:16 AM.

  2. #2
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    Two points.

    Humans are creatures of habit.

    No matter where you go, there you are.

    Certainly for many of us, even those of us living in or near other major US metros, Manhatten would require adjustments as opposed to transitions, but overall, I found that the "feel" of the individual nooks and crannies of the island (which you might not be required to leave) were just "neighborhoods" and like most major cities, you like some hoods more than others.

    I've got a neighbor who obsesses with Atlanta, espousing the places and people while downtrodding her own town. Yet, it seems she's "seeking" and fails to realize that she'd prolly carry her same angst to the Big Peach and start pizzering on it after a few months.

    Ironically, even a small town prolly offers diverse life experiences as long as a person is willing to experience diverse life experiences. The grass is green wherever you are?

  3. #3
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    I wouldn't say I disliked it, but didn't find anything amazing about it. Can't say I've been to that many places, but it was just another city really. Where as Tokyo, that was amazing. I guess it's what you find interesting.
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  4. #4
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    I've lived most of my 60+ years in northern New Jersey, about an hour's drive from Manhattan. Going into the city has become a major hassle. The only times I go anymore is for something special like a Broadway show or concert, or to visit the few relatives still there. Otherwise there isn't much that the city offers that isn't available in the suburbs. NYC isn't a novelty anymore for me, but for those who haven't been, I can understand why they would find the city to be amazing, even with some of the touristy areas. It's certainly unlike any other city, which explains why it's so popular.
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  5. #5
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    We're on the outskirts--and I kind of agree. Part of what has happened is that it has turned into a playground for the rich, with the working folks doing walk-ons to add local color. Oh, and keep the well-to-do provisioned, especially with take-out.

    The development pressures are huge, and the way that ordinary folks are being displaced, and the artists and musicians are being displaced--is it really the Village, when you are down to high end clothing stores, CYS/Citibanks, almost no music venues and eye-watering rent for what were once affordable apartments?--not to mention the costs of actually thinking about buying almost anywhere in the 5 Boroughs.

    Short version--it has jumped the shark--and although there is still lots to see and visit as a tourist, the city has been hollowed out by greed, skyrocketing commercial rents, disappearing jobs for ordinary people and some extraordinarily bad planning choices. (Totally agree about Hudson Yards--the full complex is nothing but an enclave for the rich.)

    London--as you say--has not been overwritten as much-partly because the English are stubborn and somewhat ineffectual---the new stuff there is just as awful, but there is less of it, and the 'small delightful shop' for whatever has survived in whole neighborhoods, even though the ordinary 'High Street' has the English version of the CVS/Citibank blight...
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  6. #6
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    You don't have to like anything you don't want to. Not even beets.

    ('cuz they taste like dirt).
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  7. #7
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    Sure it's ok. I don't like it. Anytime I've said it in a social setting, no one has looked at me as some sort of monster or freak. I'd say it's usually 50/50 agreeing with me.

    I live about 2hrs from NYC. I think I've been there 5 times over 30yrs. There's so many other places I'd rather go.
    My wife loves it though. She worked there at one time. She'd visit anytime. I try to avoid those conversations.
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  8. #8
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    I see it like #5 sees it.

    Boston is pretty much the same way.

    I'm pretty much all set with Manhattan unless going for a specific particular reason (like the Met museum, Rangers game or whatever) but still enjoy much of the other Boroughs. That being said, I probably wouldn't bother with the other boroughs either if I didn't have good friends in Queens and Bronx that I like visiting.

  9. #9
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    have never been to NYC, no desire to go either.

    for me, anything resembling a 'human anthill' seems like a good place to avoid.

    I'm more of an 'uninhabited desert island' type...
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    So,it looks like I may be the only person in the world that does not like New York City
    If you grew up in the Poconos in the 70s through 90s you were raised to dislike NYC and its inhabitants.

    As a result, after spending 24 years there, I only visited the city twice during school trips. Now that I'm 2,000 miles away I feel like I missed out - but not enough to visit.

  11. #11
    Eddy 53:11
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    I don't like NYC.

    I get the same reaction when I tell people I've never seen the movie Star Wars. They are hurt and oddly angry-like. IDK.
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  12. #12
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    I like NY. I travel there for work occasionally, have family there as well. Maybe I'm just used to big city living seeing as I live in the DC area. Granted, it help when I'm paying my way in NY on my Corp credit card... Otherwise I agree that it's too damn expensive.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JetSpeed View Post
    I get the same reaction when I tell people I've never seen the movie Star Wars. They are hurt and oddly angry-like. IDK.
    I once mentioned to a fan of the band Phish, "I'm not really into those guys". I thought he was going to start a fight with me.

  14. #14
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    I didn't like NYC so I moved out after 1 year of living there (Manhattan). BTW, visiting there vs living there are not the same experiences. When I was there, the local news and TV programs often say, this place is not for everybody. Those who don't mind the high cost of living (either by having a high income or willing to put up with crammed conditions) seem to do fine living there.

  15. #15
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    I've been having a love/hate relationship with NYC since I first saw it in 1966, as we came in on the Hoboken ferry (that really dates me!). I saw NY during the years of decline, rebirth, and stagnation. I still have family there, and go in about once every 2 years for a short trip. Always go down to the lower East Side and areas down there for shopping; a place where you can find ANYTHING if you just look. Up to the Bronx for good Latino food, maybe even over to Flushing for Asian food...

    I gave up bothering to drive in the city years ago. Back then, I used to drive tractor-trailer, and got into the city at least once a month. Today, I usually just take the Amtrak into the city, then the subway to get to my relatives. You really do not need a car there.
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  16. #16
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    You are among friends. Which one of you has a real NYC story to share?


  17. #17
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    Not a fan of NYC. Not a fan of the people who live there......I'm not even a fan of Chicago, or the people who live there......Actually, I'm not a fan of people.....You know what they say...Ö..It's always something....If it's not one thing, then it's another.
    If your opinion differs from mine, ..........Too bad.
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  18. #18
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    There's lots to dislike and lots to like. The list of each could be endless but that's to be expected in an really huge city whose urban area contains 14 million people, with a community representing every country on the planet. That's a hard number to process even living here and harder to understand when you are lucky enough to have grown up and lived in small town America.

    I grew up 20 miles north, have spent 40 years living 20 miles east and 37 of those working in Brooklyn. I HATE Brooklyn with a passion, except some times I love it. Manhattan - also know as "The City" is the same way, only with a few hundred thousand tourists present on any given day (or whatever the number is). Like as not if you stop and chat with somebody on a Manhattan street mid-day they're as likely to be from out of town as a tourist or likely as resident living in the city. It's almost an oddity to actually meet somebody who was born in Manhattan.

    It's simple to hate NY'ers, hate the NYC attitude, hate the city as whole, then something like 911 happens and you realize why you love it and the people.

    I hope to leave someday, my sights are on rural northern New Mexico and fear I will always have that NY attitude, which I recognize and wish wasn't present. Maybe some day I'll get the boy out of Brooklyn and Brooklyn out of the boy.

    As note, NY is not NYC. NY is a remarkably beautiful state with typical middle America folks living there. Don't confuse the two.
    Last edited by Steve B.; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:20 PM.

  19. #19
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    OMG, I canít even relate.... I live exactly 8 miles from lower Manhattan as the crow flies. 9/11 was locally brutal. My town had the 2nd highest casualty count after NYC proper. I grew up with the Met and the Garden... the Met. Period. I canít imagine that not being home. It is the most amazing thing on earth. My wife and daughter do Broadway regularly. Iím meh. My cousin was 2nd lead ballerina in the Geoffrey ballet. I saw the Nutcracker way more than Iíd like... I LOVE Manhattan! I regularly ride on the Bay with amazing NYC views. And not a car in sight... our highlands are looking at the skyline. I canít imagine what you might want that isn't already there? I have recently been in ĒThe CityĒ for healthcare referrals for my wife. Again... I donít see not liking the capital of the world?
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  20. #20
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    I just wonder why the ďnational media ď is so fixated on the likes of the Mets, the Jets, the Giants and the Knicks. Dang those teams suck! I donít care a ratís ass about them and I wish the east-coast-biased sports media would squawk about some other teams that deserve the coverage.

  21. #21
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    [QUOTE=Steve B.;5311647]T

    It's simple to hate NY'ers, hate the NYC attitude, hate the city as whole, then something like 911 happens and you realize why you love it and the people.

    QUOTE]

    Gotta love the NYC attitude,I have to give the city some credit for it. When I was living in San Francisco and Las Vegas the cheerful " hiiiiii..how are you/how's going " thing seemed nice and refreshing at first but I've got fed up pretty quickly. It's something most European tourists find so joyful and pleasant,but it takes a bit of extra time spent in the USA to understand it's all fake crap. On the opposite I love the " here is your stuff, get out of my face " attitude of NYC,it' reminds me the good 'ol European way of living..

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devastazione View Post
    When I was living in San Francisco and Las Vegas the cheerful " hiiiiii..how are you/how's going " thing seemed nice and refreshing at first but I've got fed up pretty quickly. It's something most European tourists find so joyful and pleasant, but it takes a bit of extra time spent in the USA to understand it's all fake crap.
    Some ppl in the US actually just ARE nice, believe it or not.

    Not all, but some.

    Don't be so jaded, man. Save that crap for when you visit Germany or France, it'll help you blend in.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SystemShock View Post
    Some ppl in the US actually just ARE nice, believe it or not.

    Not all, but some.

    Don't be so jaded, man. Save that crap for when you visit Germany or France, it'll help you blend in.
    .
    I've been living on and off in the US for 20 years,yes people definitely tend to be nicer than Europe.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B. View Post
    As note, NY is not NYC. NY is a remarkably beautiful state with typical middle America folks living there. Don't confuse the two.
    I just remembered a skit of Saturday Night Live with Chris Farley and Chris Elliott playing trucker hat wearing suburban store clerks and Michael McKean playing a city dweller who was on a trip outside of city and got fed up with the "slow" service at the store and showed his city mannerism. For that, he was beaten up.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eretz View Post
    What was this thread about?
    Basically an episode of Seinfeld Show.

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