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  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MIN in PDX
    I worked as a wrench in high school. I got $15/bike to assemble them out of the box. No hourly base.

    Those were good times. I remember biking 10 miles each way to work at the only shop that would employee a 16 year old.
    $15/bike????? thats like $30/hr

    i'm not worried about my appearance or personal skills. im probably gonna wear kaki shorts or pants and a solid colored shirt. not too worried about that. the people that work in the shop mostly wear whatever, except the head mechanic always wears one of those button up bike mech shirts.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by david462
    $15/bike????? thats like $30/hr

    i'm not worried about my appearance or personal skills. im probably gonna wear kaki shorts or pants and a solid colored shirt. not too worried about that. the people that work in the shop mostly wear whatever, except the head mechanic always wears one of those button up bike mech shirts.
    I wore thongs and a halter top, maybe that's why they paid me so much.

  3. #28
    Oh hai there
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    Performance pays me $9hr to stay awake for a few hours two days a month...lol

  4. #29
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    i have an interview in 1 hour....

    im nervous/anxious as hell. not for the interview, but cause i want this job so bad if i get it ill be so freaking happy.

    my thought is if they are going through the trouble to interview me, they are in the position to hire someone... and i believe im the right person, or good enough to work there basically.

    im trying to stay calm but i cant.

  5. #30
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    Smoke some Rope.

    Quote Originally Posted by david462
    ....im trying to stay calm but i cant.
    You'll fit right in.
    Quote Originally Posted by the_dude
    these are better than i was expecting, and my expectations were already rather high.

  6. #31
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    Sorry this is late, but why only look at bike shops? There must be other jobs in town that pay as much / more... bartending, waiting tables, mowing lawns, dealin dope... just saying
    * not actually a Rock Star

  7. #32
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    So how did the interview go?

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creakyknees
    Sorry this is late, but why only look at bike shops? There must be other jobs in town that pay as much / more... bartending, waiting tables, mowing lawns, dealin dope... just saying
    true true. the bike shop is the first place i want to work at. im expecting the pay to be low but will make up for it cause my summers earnings are going towards building up my RS2. and i'd love to work in that shop....

    the only bad thing about finding a different job to stay in clemson is that its not gonna pay $11/hr like i'd get at Dicks, except waiting tables, and those jobs are hard to get around here especially having no experience.

    but if i dont get the job im gonna look around, maybe grocery stores or whatever. its gonna be hell for work but hopefully it'd be worth it and ill make enough money for bike parts.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevers
    So how did the interview go?
    thanks for asking...

    got there on time... walk in, say im here to see Mike (store manager) for an interview. lady points me to his direction...

    greet each other, shake hands, then go out the back door to talk outside (theres not really a room in there to conduct an interview).

    so im out there stairing into the sun cause i didnt bring in my sunglasses... he asks me questions that i figure he'd ask. some questions he didnt ask that i wished he did (whats your major?, im an mechanical engineering major and i personally think thatd help my cause). also didnt ask if i ride but i guess that should be a given.

    i was very honest with everything he asked. for the most part i said i had experience or was confident with (insert task here). a few things i admitted i had no experience with, like 3 speed hubs and bleeding hydraulic fluid.

    asked me about parts and clothing. said ive been riding road for 2 years, done a lot of research/ read reviews, in process of building own bike blah blah blah.

    he talked a lot about how the store is run, hopefully meaning that hes interested in hiring me. i mean he talked 5-10 minutes just about the store.

    asked if i was familiar with the specialized line (main brand they sell). good question for me since i visit their website at least once a week and tried to buy a tarmac i was eyeing for a few months till financial issues arose. i told him ive read a few of the technical documents from specialized (fact stuff).

    asked a few technical questions i sorda stumbled on but they were things that i could definitly learn i just wasnt up to date...

    after 10 minutes or so he had the main mechanic come out and talk as well. this guy is real cool. ive dealt with him a few times just buying small parts. he asked better questions for me i think too.

    anyways at the end of it all he said they'd talk it over and let me know...

    now im waiting for the call.


    and since this is the lounge and almost anything goes...

    if anyone saw my other thread about electric razors, well, i went to walmart after my interview and they didnt have them in teh store. i was pissed. but before that i sold some old ps2 games at gamestop for $22 then sold my ps2 to my roomate for $40. then i went for a 2 hour ride.

    the end.

  10. #35
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    Sounds like it went well.

    And if not, well you can always sell your body on the streets.
    * not actually a Rock Star

  11. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Creakyknees
    Sounds like it went well.

    And if not, well you can always sell your body on the streets.
    or your blood or other bodily fluids....

  12. #37
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    Yeah, sounds like it did go well. Why don't you investigate other options while you wait. That way you have other alternatives (besides the blood, blood plasma, or other bodily fluids.....)

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevers
    Yeah, sounds like it did go well. Why don't you investigate other options while you wait. That way you have other alternatives (besides the blood, blood plasma, or other bodily fluids.....)
    i applied online to food lion, hopefully as a grocery stocker and not standing up front at the checkout. i didnt fully finish the application cause you can save your progress. i did everything except answer the stupid questions with check boxes. i still got an (automatic) email saying they got my app.

    when do you think i can expect a call back? will they call even if i dont get the job?

    ive never had to wait like this. ive had three other jobs. 2 i got hired on the spot after the interview, and the third (dicks sporting goods) i got a call back 5 minutes after i left on my drive home.

  14. #39
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    i got a call back today, he asked me to come in tomorrow morning to build a few bikes and go from there...

    no big deal cause building bikes is pretty easy right? ive built hundreds of bikes...

    but i am nervous. i dont know what bikes hes gonna have me build. but ive never built a carbon fiber bike. what kinda grease do i use for the seatpost?

    also, when building high end bikes do mechanics normally usue a torque wrench on everything, or anything? keep in mind the bikes come mostly assembled. it should jsut be a matter of installing stem/handlebars, front wheel, pedals, adjusting brakes deraillers.

  15. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by david462
    no big deal cause building bikes is pretty easy right? ive built hundreds of bikes....
    You have put together hundreds, but have you ever properly assembled and adjusted a bike?

    Quote Originally Posted by david462
    also, when building high end bikes do mechanics normally usue a torque wrench on everything, or anything? keep in mind the bikes come mostly assembled. it should jsut be a matter of installing stem/handlebars, front wheel, pedals, adjusting brakes deraillers.
    Torque wrench...Some do and some don't, the more you work with it, the less you need it.

    If you just installed those parts and adjusted the brakes and gears, I would not be impressed.

    I would ask to see if they have check list for assembly, if so, follow that.
    Lube all threads, ask about torque specs, and if they want you to use a torque wrench.
    You will look better to them if you ask questions about the build.
    Your experience at Dicks will do you little good when building for a good shop, you will probably start by removing some parts and checking bearing adjustments and such. Never assume anything is adjusted or tight from the factory.
    Good luck

    FYI. I was Branch manager for a local chain for 10 years, hired and fired many. I was in the industry for 20+ years total. I'm glad I'm out.
    Last edited by mrfixit; 03-26-2008 at 08:50 AM.
    Todd .....If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by david462
    i got a call back today, he asked me to come in tomorrow morning to build a few bikes and go from there...

    Grats.

    Make sure to read, re-read and take to heart everything in mrfixit's post.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrfixit
    You have put together hundreds, but have you ever properly assembled and adjusted a bike?


    Torque wrench...Some do and some don't, the more you work with it, the less you need it.

    If you just installed those parts and adjusted the brakes and gears, I would not be impressed.

    I would ask to see if they have check list for assembly, if so, follow that.
    Lube all threads, ask about torque specs, and if they want you to use a torque wrench.
    You will look better to them if you ask questions about the build.
    Your experience at Dicks will do you little good when building for a good shop, you will probably start by removing some parts and checking bearing adjustments and such. Never assume anything is adjusted or tight from the factory.
    Good luck

    FYI. I was Branch manager for a local chain for 10 years, hired and fired many. I was in the industry for 20+ years total. I'm glad I'm out.
    k, so before i build, i should ask if they go by a checklist for the builds, and ask about the torque wrench...

    lube all threads? i know im not a professional, but i also didnt know that you need to lube ALL threads... i never lube stem bolts. they usually came from the factory with some loc-tite on them bu thats it...

    so do i really lube all threads? and if i do, do i just use some of the same grease i would use on the pedals?

    im glad you gave me that information but it kinda made me more nervous. im trying not to worry about it though cause its not like i NEED this job

    edit: also, i know they want it done right, but they also know i dont know everything that a mechanic should know from my interview with them. they know im willing to learn. and i still think im well ahead of the guy sitting behind the counter when i went in to get a chain tool. he had know idea what i was talking about and had to ask the main mechanic behind him. bought a tube from the same guy and he didnt bother to ask any specifics about the size, valve type/length etc. i ended up with a tube where the valve was barely long enough for my already shallow rim. i know i shoulda made sure it was right as the customer, but if it was the other way around, i woulda made sure the customer was getting the proper tube.
    Last edited by david462; 03-26-2008 at 10:45 AM.

  18. #43
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    They are going to want to know that you are methodical and thorough.

  19. #44
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    Mr. Fixit has most of it nailed. The difference between average and good include lubing places like stem bolts, seatposts, binder bolts, ahead bolts, etc

    Then read up on things like pre-stretching cables. Take the wheels off and check the tension and true/round etc. factory wheels are often a source of issues.

    One good way to see how they build is show up 10 minutes early and take a quick scan of how they set up stems for instance. Most shops leave them in the "up" position but some flip them over so they look more racer boy, etc,

    +2 on the pre-build checklist.

    Good Luck

  20. #45
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    i looked on the park tool site a bit just now....

    for greesing threads, it looks like you want to use a liquid type grease on smaller threads (headset size) and the thicker grease on larger threads (pedals).

    havnt looked at cable stretching yet.

    hopefully these are the only two things i wouldnt have done at dicks that i will do at the shop.

    do i really have to take the rear wheel off to check that its true?

  21. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by david462
    k, so before i build, i should ask if they go by a checklist for the builds, and ask about the torque wrench...

    lube all threads? i know im not a professional, but i also didnt know that you need to lube ALL threads... i never lube stem bolts. they usually came from the factory with some loc-tite on them bu thats it...

    so do i really lube all threads? and if i do, do i just use some of the same grease i would use on the pedals?

    im glad you gave me that information but it kinda made me more nervous. im trying not to worry about it though cause its not like i NEED this job.
    Yes, you should lube all threads with grease, unless they are Ti, then use anti-sneeze or Ti prep. Even if a bolt comes pre-lubed, I usually lube it again. It can't hurt.
    A torque wrench will not give you an accurate reading with dry threads, one more reason to lube them.
    If they don't start by giving you a build check list, then ask if they use one. If they don't use one, they should. It's the best way for a shop to ensure a quality build every time.
    Then, ask if you will need a torque wrench for the build?
    They will probably give you a basic bike to build, and you should not need a torque wrench to build it.
    Carbon and light weight parts are usually the most sensitive to over tightening. Some shops will use a torque wrench for crank bolts.
    Just make sure you know what they expect to be done as part of the assembly process.
    They already know that you will need some training, so don't be afraid to ask.
    The worst interviews are the ones where the applicant thinks he knows it all.
    Don't stress, if you are good with a wrench, it won't matter that you don't know everything.
    Todd .....If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.

  22. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by david462
    i looked on the park tool site a bit just now....

    for greesing threads, it looks like you want to use a liquid type grease on smaller threads (headset size) and the thicker grease on larger threads (pedals).

    havnt looked at cable stretching yet.

    hopefully these are the only two things i wouldnt have done at dicks that i will do at the shop.

    do i really have to take the rear wheel off to check that its true?
    There are several thing that you will want to check on the rear wheel. You won't be able to check it, with it in the bike.
    You need to check that the rear cones are adjusted and that the outer lock nuts are tight. You will want to check that the cassette lock ring is tight, they may also want that greased, they may even want the cassette body greased lightly.
    You will want to grease the skewer shaft, before re-installing it.
    Then the wheel will need to be checked for true. A cheaper bike may be done in the bike, a nice bike will done in the truing stand. It depends on the shop.....follow that build check list
    That should cover the basics for the rear wheel. Now you can see that Dicks and the LBS (a good one) are worlds apart.

    All the shops I have worked in just used grease on threads, usually applied with a paint brush, in a tub of Park Polylube or other crap grease.
    Last edited by mrfixit; 03-26-2008 at 05:20 PM.
    Todd .....If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.

  23. #48
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    Checking these things is always a good idea. Even high end Mavic wheels come out of the box with play in the hubs so checking them out for the bike is always a good call. Grease is cheap, components aren't. On nicer bikes I'd even pull the BB and re-grease that. I personally don't see the need to use multiple types of grease as long as you have a good shop quality of grease on the bench.

    Each wrench has his own quirks. I personally love to take a tiny amount of slick honey grease and put in on new cables. Then I wipe them off with a clean rag but just enough of the slick honey stays after wiping to make it shift/brake just a bit smoother.

    Really fast builders do things like hone/ream seat tube if bike is steel/alum/ti while bike is still IN the box. Then they grease seat tube, install post and hang it in the stand. They will then grease all the spots they can quickly access like the crank threads, binder bolts, etc

    I don't want to overcomplicate things for you but AT least if you hear terms like "pre-stretch" and such hopefully you'll be a little familiar and not have any deer in the headlights if they ask. Good luck, I'm pulling for you just because it seems like you have put some effort into this.

  24. #49
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    I GOT HIRED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    k i just typed a whole essay about how it went and know no one is gonna read that so heres a shorter version....

    highlight was building a rouboux. even though i was nervous as hell while doing it. came out pretty good, the mechanic looked it over and didnt adjust a single thing and there it went onto the sales floor.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by david462
    I GOT HIRED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    k i just typed a whole essay about how it went and know no one is gonna read that so heres a shorter version....

    highlight was building a rouboux. even though i was nervous as hell while doing it. came out pretty good, the mechanic looked it over and didnt adjust a single thing and there it went onto the sales floor.

    congrats...
    Of course I'm sure...that doesn't mean I'm right.....

    "There's no sense being stupid unless you show it."

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