Open this thread if you work/ed in a bike shop - Page 3
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  1. #51
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    congrats...
    +1, first bike I built at the shop, the owner told me I had just killed a little kid. (my minor mistake wasn't anywhere near that severe, but I got super careful about building his bikes)

  2. #52
    limit screwed
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    It sounds like they've decided you're good enough to start. Be good enough to keep.

    That means staying thorough, and always taking time to learn more about your job, especially concerning proprietary parts you'll have to deal with. Always do your best, because the better you do your job, the better the people up front will be able to do theirs. Be comfortable talking to customers, using whatever point-of-sale system the store uses, and know all store policies concerning returns, warranties, whatever. Sometimes "mechanics" don't bother to learn this stuff, and it costs time and the customer's attention when someone else has to stop what they're doing to finish a job or transaction that you can't.

    Also, customers nowadays have access to a lot more information than in the past, thanks to sites like this. Be sure to read up on everything you can, from the mundane to the exotic. Read this site, read Velonews, Cyclingnews, Weight Weenies, Roues Artisanales, Fairwheel Bikes...whatever you can. You might not have to deal with this type of customer. But if you do, and you have the knowledge they expect you to have, you can make big sales on a relatively small daily investment of time.
    "They'll be making us a shoe made entirely of steel wool and canvas. Steel is real, wool is real, so it follows that steel wool is the realest material of them all."
    -buck-50

  3. #53
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    Good job. Tear it up.

    Make customers first, you'll always make sales off customers.

    Be a problem solver, when someone needs help, has a problem, than think of yourself as a problem solver not a sales person. Being one makes customers, which makes for good sales.

    Be true to yourself and never sell someone something wrong just to make a sale. Sell it to them because you would sell it to your own family member if they came to you the same way the customer has. Give them good advice, and a good product, then they'll come back and start to ask for you.

    Last, the quickest selection isn't always the best one. I worked with a guy that had failed at every shop he owned or worked at. The only thing we did different was that he always strived to make the sale/get their money as quickly as he could. Though he sold lots, his $hit sales always had customers coming back with problems. He wasn't a problem solver...he was a shortsighted problem starter. Educated, friendly, knowledgable, and completely problamatic to work with. He got so excited by the thought of making the sale, that he forgot to make sound decisions that made customers.
    Last edited by teoteoteo; 03-27-2008 at 03:31 PM.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by teoteoteo
    Good job. Tear it up.

    Make customers first, you'll always make sales off customers.

    Be a problem solver, when someone needs help, has a problem, than think of yourself as a problem solver not a sales person. Being one makes customers, which makes for good sales.

    Be true to yourself and never sell someone something wrong just to make a sale. Sell it to them because you would sell it to your own family member if they came to you the same way the customer has. Give them good advice, and a good product, then they'll come back and start to ask for you.

    Last, the quickest selection isn't always the best one. I worked with a guy that had failed at every shop he owned or worked at. The only thing we did different was that he always strived to make the sale/get their money as quickly as he could. Though he sold lots, his $hit sales always customers coming back with problems. He wasn't a problem solver...he was a shortsighted problem starter. Educated, friendly, knowledgable, and completely problamatic to work with. He got so excited by the thought of making the sale, that he forgot to make sound decisions that made customers.

    +1 on the above advice.

    I'm currently in Sales and I always try and understand the customer and their issues.

    When I got my first job, post college, my dad told me to "keep my eyes and ears open and my mouth shut. You might learn something" Still try and follow that advice today.

    Enjoy your summer...

  5. #55
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    thanks for the comments/praise/motivation everyone. im really excited about this cause hopefully by the time i graduate ill know a ton more about bikes, and maybe eventually take that to my career (mech engineer)....

    im gonna have to wait a few weeks to ask about discounts/employee pricing cause i dont want it to look like thats the only reason why i took the job (i think that its obvious thats one of the reasons considering the pay decrease from dicks)...

    but does anyone know offhand what it might be? im thinking they will usually let me buy stuff (ordering it) at dealer cost, or maybe 10% above that? not sure. but my thinking is to sell my RS2 frame/fork when it comes and buy the Tarmac expert (rival). it retails for $3000 so is it safe to say i can buy one for ~$1500?

  6. #56

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    congrats.....
    So, did they use a build check list?
    Todd .....If you can't be kind, at least have the decency to be vague.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrfixit
    congrats.....
    So, did they use a build check list?
    no... i did not ask about the check list or torque specs at first cause the first bike i built was a $400 hardrock. the last bike i built, a roubaix, i was going to ask, but thought the roubaix was like the final test to see if i was good at this stuff. i thought asking for a checklist at that point would make them think i didnt know how to build this bike (lots of parts to install compared to moutain bikes)....

    the other reason i didnt ask is that before i started they pretty much told me what to do with the bikes as far as things you dont always have to do (reflectors, hang manual on bars, etc.).

    i asked a few questions while building though, and the way i asked kinda made it look like i kenw what i was doing but wanted to double check, which i think helped me cause it showed that i wasnt gonna do things my own way and that i wanted to learn the correct way.

    like i asked about greasing a carbon fiber seat post (i knew you shouldnt use regular grease, you need that gritty kind), but i asked to show that i had an idea and i also just didnt know where it was located in the shop.

    i asked if they normally lube cables, they said no, the housing comes lubed.

    stuff like that.

  8. #58
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    Last summer i started at minimum wage, and ended the summer at least $0.50 over - don't remember exactly. My primary task was assembling and tuning new bikes.

    Edit: Congrats on the job. I know i certainly learned a lot in the 4 months i spent in a shop. Personally, I got 30-35% off retail discount wise. A friend of mine who worked at a competing shop payed dealer cost + 10%.

  9. #59
    waterproof*
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    Just wait till the first time you drop a wrench and ding a new bike. Fun fun fun.
    * not actually a Rock Star

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Creakyknees
    Just wait till the first time you drop a wrench and ding a new bike. Fun fun fun.
    Blowing up a tube due to an improperly seated tire bead is pretty fun. Makes one heck of a BANG!

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__
    Blowing up a tube due to an improperly seated tire bead is pretty fun. Makes one heck of a BANG!
    heard it the first day, but wasnt me that did it

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