Recovering from a white collar felony conviction
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  1. #1
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    Recovering from a white collar felony conviction

    I have a buddy, that is getting ready to accept a felony plea. Obviously, he is quite depressed, and thinks the future is hopeless. He does not face any prison time, but will loose his license to practice his profession.

    In prison, they house you feed you and clothe you. The question that I don't have the answer to his "how do you recover from a felony conviction"

    What kind of meaningful employment can he/she expect? How do you support a family?

    My buddy is 50ish, and this is their first time in trouble with the law. Any firsthand or thirdhand experiences would be much appreciated....

  2. #2
    Captain Obvious
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    can he possibly take a job in the same industry but not the same position?

    sounds like he may need a totally new career choice. not easy to do. my mother-in-law's old-old boss took a plea bargain for something he didn't do. not exactly sure what he did after that, but i think he stay active in the legal profession, but not as a lawyer.
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  3. #3
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    He is in a real bad spot, and can use some encouragement. Unfortunately, I don't have any.

  4. #4
    Stumpcake!
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    White collar means he's most likely smart. I'd guess if he was in the medical profession or something that lends to one's character and/or trust he's pretty screwed from going back into it. But the good news is that being pretty smart he could possibly teach (not kids) or do something entreprenuerial. It's not hopeless by any means....he just needs to think outside the confines of his old job.

    /Edited for crappy grammar...or is it grammer....whatever.
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  5. #5
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    teaching is a thought, but I don't know if you can get on with a district, with a felony conviction.

  6. #6
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    I think you start by finding some sort of support group that can put him in touch with other organizations that help people getting back into regular life following a conviction. I know for example that there are companies with very generous policies towards felons, the problem is finding them. This is pretty much what a coworker I had did.

    Bad situation, I hope he can pull it back together.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by t-moore
    I have a buddy, that is getting ready to accept a felony plea. Obviously, he is quite depressed, and thinks the future is hopeless. He does not face any prison time, but will loose his license to practice his profession.

    In prison, they house you feed you and clothe you. The question that I don't have the answer to his "how do you recover from a felony conviction"

    What kind of meaningful employment can he/she expect? How do you support a family?

    My buddy is 50ish, and this is their first time in trouble with the law. Any firsthand or thirdhand experiences would be much appreciated....
    Unfortunately, I get to have this chat with people all the time. Prisons are not geared towards helping educated people or people with serious addiction problems. Unless he's looking for a GED, he shouldn't look for hope there.

    The "Reader's Digest" version of how to dig yourself out of that hole involves:

    1. Not ever giving in to the "I am the victim" or "I'll never be anything when I'm done because the 'system' has ruined me" mindset.

    2. Understand and commit to the fact that there are NO shortcuts and that rebuilding your life is going to be a lot of hard work (just as living "straight" is a lot of hard work for most Americans). Don't let that challenge get discouraging, rather understand that it's how everybody else is living right now as well.

    3. Find something you love to do and open your own business. Money earning potential in America is capped only by how hard you're willing to work and how efficiently you can run a business. If you can get a decent business going you then have the option to give others a "second" chance (and, possibly, at below-market rates), if you so choose.

    Most of all, tell your buddy not to feel too bad. There are a lot more people out there with felony convictions than he thinks. He'll have to be a little creative, but it's not the end of the world.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the replies, my friend is a salesman, and hopefully he will be able to find a position is that capacity....

  9. #9
    jaded bitter joy crusher
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    I hear a lot of self-absorption in what you say about your friend. Were there victims of his crime? Some appropriate guilt and efforts to make amends, either to the victims or to society would go a long way toward getting his mind off his own problems.

    Something else I don't see in the comments here is church. Church can be a good place to get your head straight. A decent church understands sin, repentance, redemption, and forgiveness.
    Fredke commented in your thread. You won't believe what happens next!

  10. #10

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    is there a Church Only forum?

    this thread moved to Church Only in 5...4...3...2...

  11. #11
    ab aeterno
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fredke
    I hear a lot of self-absorption in what you say about your friend. Were there victims of his crime? Some appropriate guilt and efforts to make amends, either to the victims or to society would go a long way toward getting his mind off his own problems.

    Something else I don't see in the comments here is church. Church can be a good place to get your head straight. A decent church understands sin, repentance, redemption, and forgiveness.
    This is a good idea. Also, maybe think of staying at home and taking care of the kids for a little while, if they are young enough? Maybe even home school them? See it as an opportunity to connect with his family. Maybe join a non-profit. He should take it as an opportunity to go do some good.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by I am The Edge
    is there a Church Only forum?

    this thread moved to Church Only in 5...4...3...2...
    I only smirked at your post, until I noticed your avatar. Then I laughed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrRoebuck
    I only smirked at your post, until I noticed your avatar. Then I laughed.

    that's what she said.

  14. #14
    Rep *****.
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    Quote Originally Posted by t-moore
    Thanks for the replies, my friend is a salesman, ..
    What kind of salesman has a license to loose?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by t-moore
    Thanks for the replies, my friend is a salesman, and hopefully he will be able to find a position is that capacity....
    The ability to sell transfers really well from one industry to another. It's not really about the product, it's about persuasion and the ability to establish rapport with people. He'll be all right.

    I think the advice given above about the victim attitude, hard work etc. is right on, and sounds like it comes from experience.
    It's funny until someone gets hurt. Then it's hilarious.

  16. #16
    Gruntled
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    Quote Originally Posted by firstrax
    What kind of salesman has a license to loose?
    Stockbroker / securities salesperson, for one...
    It's funny until someone gets hurt. Then it's hilarious.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by t-moore
    Thanks for the replies, my friend is a salesman, and hopefully he will be able to find a position is that capacity....

    A salesman with a felony conviction.... that's all the experience he needs for a career in politics.


    supervillain

  18. #18
    gazing from the shadows
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    Quote Originally Posted by t-moore
    I have a buddy, that is getting ready to accept a felony plea. Obviously, he is quite depressed, and thinks the future is hopeless. He does not face any prison time, but will loose his license to practice his profession.

    Is his felony from doing something bad to his employer, or customers? That will matter to potential future employers. Screwing over customers might make him perfect for a job selling used cars.
    .
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  19. #19
    your text here
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    a friend's dad went to the slammer for white collar crime. embezzlement. when he got out he still found a job in the same profession.

    then he went away agin for more embezzling...
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by t-moore
    I have a buddy, that is getting ready to accept a felony plea. Obviously, he is quite depressed, and thinks the future is hopeless. He does not face any prison time, but will loose his license to practice his profession.

    In prison, they house you feed you and clothe you. The question that I don't have the answer to his "how do you recover from a felony conviction"

    What kind of meaningful employment can he/she expect? How do you support a family?

    My buddy is 50ish, and this is their first time in trouble with the law. Any firsthand or thirdhand experiences would be much appreciated....
    I think that your questions are ones that your friend should be asking his lawyer before he pleads guilty. Only someone who knows all of the facts can really assess the situation. In some states, felons are subject to all kinds of disabilities -- such as not being able to vote or sit on juries. There also are whole professions and/or industries that cannot or will not hire a convicted felon (e.g., financial services industry). Sometimes a convicted felon can obtain or regain a professional license after a period of some time where the person has stayed out of trouble. One big problem that I see from what I know about the admission of convicted felons to the legal profession is that the younger someone was when he or she committed the crime and the longer the time has passed since the conviction, the greater the likelihood that the person will be able to be licensed. Your friend was not an inexperienced youth when he committed his crime and will not have many years in which to rehabilitate himself. Also, at least in the legal profession, you have a greater chance of being admitted to the bar if you were not a member of the bar when you committed your crime than if you committed your crime after you already were licensed. Since your buddy already was licensed, he may have a much harder time than if he were not in a licensed profession at the time that he committed his crime.
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  21. #21
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    He could move to Memphis and be a city official of some sort.
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  22. #22
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea138
    He could move to Memphis and be a city official of some sort.
    Public official, preferably elected vs. apointed...
    a lot it will depend on what he did.
    I had a rental applicant come to me with a felony on his reccord. should have gone with him instead of who i got. He got nabbed with a small amount of coke a few years back at 18.

  23. #23
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    Financial Services Industry

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkS
    I think that your questions are ones that your friend should be asking his lawyer before he pleads guilty. Only someone who knows all of the facts can really assess the situation. In some states, felons are subject to all kinds of disabilities -- such as not being able to vote or sit on juries. There also are whole professions and/or industries that cannot or will not hire a convicted felon (e.g., financial services industry). Sometimes a convicted felon can obtain or regain a professional license after a period of some time where the person has stayed out of trouble. One big problem that I see from what I know about the admission of convicted felons to the legal profession is that the younger someone was when he or she committed the crime and the longer the time has passed since the conviction, the greater the likelihood that the person will be able to be licensed. Your friend was not an inexperienced youth when he committed his crime and will not have many years in which to rehabilitate himself. Also, at least in the legal profession, you have a greater chance of being admitted to the bar if you were not a member of the bar when you committed your crime than if you committed your crime after you already were licensed. Since your buddy already was licensed, he may have a much harder time than if he were not in a licensed profession at the time that he committed his crime.
    The rules in the Financial Services industry are pretty strict, but that strictness can lead to some very weird results.

    True story: there is a federal statute that bars people convicted of certain crimes involving "dishonesty" from being employed at a bank. It does not bar those convicted of violent crimes. A bank that I know hired a gentleman who had been convicted of murdering his ex-wife. No direct ban on it. It does, however, raise some interesting HR issues...
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  24. #24
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    Maybe it's time for a career change. Lots of people do it successfully at 50.

    Julia Child wrote "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" when she was about 50.

  25. #25
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    Again, I want to thank everyone for their replies. This was the ultimate victimless crime, as my buddy is the only one who lost money. A wrong date on an application can get you in a lot of trouble in some industries...

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