Stereo Receiver help - Page 2
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 93
  1. #26
    Sweet Potato Kugel
    Reputation: Eretz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,152
    Great Thread.
    Last edited by Eretz; 02-23-2019 at 05:46 AM.

  2. #27
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,900
    Quote Originally Posted by Z'mer View Post
    There are very few good AM/FM tuners being made anymore. Almost everything today uses compromised car radio electronics, including most new "receivers". And yes, those true high end tuners are pricey.
    yes that's what I'm seeing.

    In this respect what is functional difference between high end and cheap using compromised car radio electronics?

    I don't know much about this stuff but I would think as far as sound quality goes that really depends on my amp and speakers.

    If it matters for sound quality though I would make it a point to get a fairly good tuner. But if the difference between good and cheap is about reception, pre-sets, display, and stuff like that I don't really care.
    I live in dowtown Boston so picking up signals from many stations I want to listen to is no problem.

    thanks,

  3. #28
    Master debator.
    Reputation: nOOky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    8,485
    Keep in mind FM radio's audio frequency range is only 20-15 kHz so if you're looking for audiophile level sound quality FM radio isn't the best source. Apparently most radio stations these days don't use CD's as their source anymore either, they use a PC to play back reduced bitrate lower quality audio mp3's. The better the equipment you have the more faithfully it will reproduce the signals it's getting. That also means it will reproduce crappy sound if that's what it's being fed just the same as it will make great input sound great. I'm not sure chasing sound quality through an FM radio signal is worth hundreds of dollars over a basic decent tuner, especially if you have great reception for the stations you want to listen to. YMMV.
    "I felt bad because I couldn't wheelie; until I met a man with no bicycle"

  4. #29
    Sweet Potato Kugel
    Reputation: Eretz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,152

  5. #30
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,900
    Interesting. And makes sense to me. Thanks.

  6. #31
    Russian Troll Farmer
    Reputation: No Time Toulouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    2,098
    Quote Originally Posted by scott967 View Post
    something to watch out for is it seems like getting a phono input is rare these days.

    scott s.
    .
    Which is why you see a certain number of amplified phonograhs now, some of which even use USB connectors. Seems to defeat the purpose.....
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  7. #32
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,996
    Actually, car radios have very good tuners, often better than home units. They have to, because they have to deal with a constantly moving receiver.

    And broadcast FM is 30-15kHz, which is a almost as wide as a full-range speaker (very good).

    Sure, you're limited by the compression, EQ, and the source material being used by the stations (many have shifted to MP3 files), but if you're like me, you're listening to THE MUSIC and as long as the signal is strong enough, you'll happily listen in mono if you can't get a stereo full quieting signal.

    It's pretty easy to manufacture a good FM tuner; my cheapo Yamaha mentioned above is an example. Finding an HD radio tuner for home use is difficult (the medium never gained popularity) and the stations offering HD broadcasts are limited.

    To me, the key to good FM reception is a good antenna, and that doesn't mean expensive. It means getting the antenna outside if at all possible. If not, then in the attic would be nice. At least get it above the roofline if you can. An omni-directional is fine for most use except for distant stations. And antenna height is EVERYTHING, to me it's even more important than tuner quality.

  8. #33
    Sweet Potato Kugel
    Reputation: Eretz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,152
    What Peter P. said about an outdoor, well placed antenna.



    Winegard Long Range FM Radio Antennas

    $39.99
    In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
    Ben Franklin -Tis curious and amazing to observe how distinct and independent of each other the rattles of this animal are, and yet how firmly they are united together

  9. #34
    Schuylkill Trail Bum
    Reputation: SPlKE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    4,331
    The main beef I had back in the analog signal FM days was station (signal?) drift (I think that's what it was called), and multipath distortion.

    I lived in philly at the time, and really liked the college stations -- UPenn when it was really a college station run by student DJs; Drexel U, which is still a real college station; and Temple U when it was an all jazz format.

    But with my Yamaha tuner, referenced a few posts back, it seemed like I was constantly finessing the tuning knob, and moving my external antenna (attached to the wall) around to try to defeat the seemingly ever-changing multipath artifacts.

    ... all of which is why I'm a big fan of today's digital-signal FM radio over-the-air broadcasting.

    My current favorite FM station is WPRB from Princeton U. It's another of the few remaining college stations run by student DJs and other DJs who just do WPRB. That said, unless I'm in the car, I listen to WPRB live stream from their website.

  10. #35
    Sweet Potato Kugel
    Reputation: Eretz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,152
    I had a Quadraphonic LR5000 Lafayette and we called that, "Thermal Drift" where the components would heat up ever so slowly. I rid most of it by not stacking the tuner at the bottom of other components -cassette deck, turn table, etc covering airways and also placed a tiny fan [back in the day expensive].

    Those were the days, and lemme tell you the doe dished out for special records and pickups in quad.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frequency_drift

  11. #36
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Akirasho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,385
    Quote Originally Posted by SPlKE View Post
    The main beef I had back in the analog signal FM days was station (signal?) drift (I think that's what it was called), and multipath distortion.
    My old Kenwood tuners feature signal lock auto tune. You can tune automatically or manually with an LED indicator for the rare times the auto tune "failed". They are pre digital so ya gotta appreciate the engineering.

  12. #37
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,644
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post
    I would think as far as sound quality goes that really depends on my amp and speakers.
    Speakers, yes. Amps, they are all good nowadays as long as they aren't malfunctioning. The other factor in sound quality is room acoustic behavior. Typical home setting isn't ideal for good bass absorption and mid to high frequency diffusion. Bit of planning and treatments can do wonders.

  13. #38
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,644
    Try a search on "receiver" under $200 on any typical consumer electronics retail site. You will find loads of them with AM & FM built-in tuner. Get a new one and be done with it.

  14. #39
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    940
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Strongbow View Post

    In this respect what is functional difference between high end and cheap using compromised car radio electronics?

    I don't know much about this stuff but I would think as far as sound quality goes that really depends on my amp and speakers.

    If it matters for sound quality though I would make it a point to get a fairly good tuner. But if the difference between good and cheap is about reception, pre-sets, display, and stuff like that I don't really care.
    I live in dowtown Boston so picking up signals from many stations I want to listen to is no problem.
    There really is no easy answer to your question. Everyone's thoughts on FM station sound and quality only reflects what they experience locally. In general, the public stations have the best sound. Some even broadcast live classical concerts over FM, I'm pretty sure WBGH Boston does, or used to.

    It really depends on what type of music, or talk, you want to listen to. Usually, classical music fans are the fussiest for FM tuners, followed by Jazz / folk / roots (un-amplified instruments) music fans.
    With better tuners, yes, you'll get better reception, including more controls to help with that. But you will also get better sound.

    Typically the measured signal to noise, distortion, stereo separation, frequency response, etc. will all be much better than inexpensive units. Simply put, for the same antenna, it the sound will be better. Yes, good reception IS all about the antenna, but even a strong signal feeding a mis-aligned inexpensive tuner won't help the poor sound quality.

    Modern FM car radio electronics have very good reception, but are not good for response flatness, distortion, separation, and ultimate quieting on a strong station.

    Now, the real question - can you hear these difference? I don't think anyone here can tell you that. You have to listen yourself.

  15. #40
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: 4slomo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    145
    You know that AM & FM broadcasts are being phased out, and those radio frequencies will be repurposed for other uses? Many are now listening to streaming broadcasts over the internet.

  16. #41
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,996
    Quote Originally Posted by 4slomo View Post
    You know that AM & FM broadcasts are being phased out, and those radio frequencies will be repurposed for other uses? Many are now listening to streaming broadcasts over the internet.
    You can't exactly do that in a car.

    Quote the source of your claim.

  17. #42
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    719
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    You can't exactly do that in a car.

    Quote the source of your claim.
    I've been doing that in my car for years..."xiia live" and "tune in" for android on my phone, my phone connected bluetooth, or headphone to aux-in, to the car. I just recently added my local classical stations to my favorites.
    Last edited by colnagoG60; 02-23-2019 at 11:19 PM.

  18. #43
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,900
    Quote Originally Posted by 4slomo View Post
    You know that AM & FM broadcasts are being phased out, and those radio frequencies will be repurposed for other uses? Many are now listening to streaming broadcasts over the internet.
    I didn't know that.

    I've been within reach of Boston stations all my life so am quiet familiar with about 15 station numbers and can't think of one example. Plenty have totally changed format but none have just stopped.

    I'll cross that bridge if I ever come to it. For now I'm happy listening to radio for free over FM and confident I'll be doing so for some years to come.

  19. #44
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    8,900
    Anyway, thanks again guys.

    And I ended up getting a Yamaha T-85.

    It's 'good enough' with the crappy piece of wire antenna but there is room for improvement so I'll probably end up getting a better antenna.

    I have 9 days to decide if I want to keep it.

    The store I went to was great and actually tried to talk me out of it in favor or getting my ancient JVC repaired. He said for someone who doesn't care about all the modern functions that my current only partially working receiver is actually a very good one and would cost a ton to get equal quality new.

    But there is a big "if" it can be repaired. The volume is finicky and balance doesn't work either so I'm not so sure about the repair option.

    I should have also looked at used receivers when I was there also but I have tunnel vision on a tuner only. But I might go back and check on full receivers used before deciding if I want to keep the Tuner for sure.

  20. #45
    Russian Troll Farmer
    Reputation: No Time Toulouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Posts
    2,098
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    You can't exactly do that in a car.

    Quote the source of your claim.
    I do EXACTLY that every single day. Have you been living under a rock for the last decade?
    "L'enfer, c'est les autres"

  21. #46
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    3,996
    Quote Originally Posted by No Time Toulouse View Post
    I do EXACTLY that every single day. Have you been living under a rock for the last decade?
    I didn't think people were such data streaming addicts.

    To the OP: You chose a pretty high end tuner. Here's all you'll ever want to know about it, HERE.

  22. #47
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,526
    Quote Originally Posted by duriel View Post
    I just got a Kenwood VR-307, about 200W amp reciever surround sound unit at Goodwill for $20. I'm just going to use it as an amp. But GW or craig's list is the way to go!
    kenwood = good audio

  23. #48
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,526
    in general, and based on anecdotal impressions,

    Yamaha and hk are the way to go for new, affordable stereo receivers. onkyo also, they all make good quality stuff in the roughly 300 to four hundred dollar range. if I were looking for used, i would search kenwood, even the older stuff produces a warm, rich quality sound. great vintage, pound for pound bang for the buck if you can find em

  24. #49
    Devoid of all flim-flam
    Reputation: Mapei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    7,093
    Sometime in the early 1960's, my audiophile dad took me to the high-fi stereo show happening at the now long-gone Ambassador Hotel in downtown L.A. It was a time when separates ruled and receivers were downscale at best. We both agreed that receivers from brand new Japanese brand Kenwood actually had pretty good sound. My dad bought the cheap one for me and the more expensive one for himself. Were they tubed? I think so. Anyway, I was a Kenwood guy until NAD separates took me down the primrose path of high end.
    Last edited by Mapei; 02-25-2019 at 01:33 PM. Reason: polish
    Mapie is a conventional looking former Hollywood bon viveur, now leading a quiet life in a house made of wood by an isolated beach. He has cultivated a taste for culture, and is a celebrated raconteur amongst his local associates, who are artists, actors, and other leftfield/eccentric types. I imagine he has a telescope, and an unusual sculpture outside his front door. He is also a beach comber. The Rydster.

  25. #50
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    940
    Quote Originally Posted by 4slomo View Post
    You know that AM & FM broadcasts are being phased out, and those radio frequencies will be repurposed for other uses? Many are now listening to streaming broadcasts over the internet.
    I can tell you with great certainty this claim is not true, at least for the US and 99.9% the world. Norway has moved their public stations, but all the private Norway stations are analog FM.

    In the US we have HD radio, which is digital radio co-existing with analog radio on the same signal frequency. Actually it occupies the side bands of the analog station signal.

    So we already have FM digital radio in the US, along with the older FM analog format. No need to turn analog off.

    And guess what - nobody cares about HD radio. Most don't even know it's there. There are very few receivers that receive it. It is going nowhere, fast, as it has been around now, in use, for over 10 years.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 32
    Last Post: 11-20-2010, 07:22 AM
  2. Edge 305 as car GPS receiver?
    By iliveonnitro in forum The Lounge
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-21-2007, 08:05 PM
  3. Replies: 21
    Last Post: 01-10-2006, 07:58 PM
  4. Receiver hitch carriers
    By Sinclair in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 09-21-2005, 08:58 AM
  5. HRM Receiver - Water or Eletrolyte Gel
    By t-moore in forum General Cycling Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 03-26-2004, 03:39 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.