Ubuntu - a game changer for me - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    I like Linux for the most part, but I use a computer for gaming primarily which leaves Linux as not an option. Haven't looked into transcoding options with Linux like ripping blu-rays so it might not be up to par there either.

  2. #27
    donuts?
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    KenB - dump KDE. Gnome seems to be the better of the two - i started out disliking Gnome way back when, now i can't stand KDE. everytime i give it a chance, it has some quirk that drives me crazy - much less integration.
    -Steve
    Quote Originally Posted by Chain
    Next time, save your energy for tomorrows ride and try not to come in 6th.

  3. #28
    feelin' Freddie Mercury
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenB
    Most of the apps I use at the office are via RDP and I've been using Chrome as my browser for a while now.
    +1 on Chrome.

    It's an awesome browser that doesn't bog when I have a zillion tabs open, and has displaced both Safari and Firefox as my browser of choice.
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  4. #29
    Ya, what ATP said...!
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    A co-worker and I created a virtual machine using Ubuntu on a flash drive and have booted it on a known infected machine with stellar results. The desktop has Zeus, dropper, koobface and several other infections and the "machine on a stick" is totally isolated. It's much slower, obviously, but it will become my travel machine, (4gb partition for the OS and minimal open source apps, 4gb second partition as a crypto vault for file storage and downloads). Ubuntu rules!

  5. #30
    Adorable Furry Hombre
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    Quote Originally Posted by asciibaron
    KenB - dump KDE. Gnome seems to be the better of the two - i started out disliking Gnome way back when, now i can't stand KDE. everytime i give it a chance, it has some quirk that drives me crazy - much less integration.
    Yer just saying that because you got banned from KDE.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  6. #31
    i like whiskey
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    All this chat is way to much work for the average computer user. Not many people want to spend the time to go through all this just to get on the internet and check their email. I could be considered a power user and very computer literate and I run bone stock Win7 at home. XP was perfectly fine before that. It does everything pretty well and I've never thought to myself "hmmm, this operating system is lacking in some areas". Certainly there is no deficiency that makes me want to sit around messing with unbuntu, or WTF it's called, to try and make that work.

    Booting an op-sys off a jump drive? Seriously? What is the point of doing that unless you are a desktop support guy. Nothing I do online is so important that I have to carry a specifically configured operating system around with me at all times. I'd venture that 99% of people are the same as I am.

  7. #32
    Palm trees & sunshine!
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    Quote Originally Posted by innergel
    All this chat is way to much work for the average computer user. Not many people want to spend the time to go through all this just to get on the internet and check their email. I could be considered a power user and very computer literate and I run bone stock Win7 at home. XP was perfectly fine before that. It does everything pretty well and I've never thought to myself "hmmm, this operating system is lacking in some areas". Certainly there is no deficiency that makes me want to sit around messing with unbuntu, or WTF it's called, to try and make that work.

    Booting an op-sys off a jump drive? Seriously? What is the point of doing that unless you are a desktop support guy. Nothing I do online is so important that I have to carry a specifically configured operating system around with me at all times. I'd venture that 99% of people are the same as I am.

    This is my sentiment exactly -- and I'm a CIO.

    I've screwed around with kubuntu now for a day and am back in Win7. Linux is definitely getting closer to being ready for the desktop but it's still not there. It's too much of a pain in the ass. Just getting my dual monitors setup was a beyotch. Running a dual boot with a Windows partition and then needing a password the first time you access that partition after a restart is a PIA. Same goes for the wireless networking. Why should I have to provide my linux password in order for my wireless to connect to the AP (on top of the AP's password)??? I'm positive that these things can be changed but I shouldn't need to change them and I don't feel like jumping through the hoops of doing so.

    It's still needlessly complicated.


    supervillain

  8. #33
    donuts?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc
    Yer just saying that because you got banned from KDE.
    actually, i got banned from Xfce.
    -Steve
    Quote Originally Posted by Chain
    Next time, save your energy for tomorrows ride and try not to come in 6th.

  9. #34
    donuts?
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    people will use what is given to them. if i buy a computer and it comes with Win7, i am more likely to use Win7 than i am any other OS. that's why it's such a big deal for MS to control the vendors. don't you remember the big dust up back when XP came out. the vendors were held hostage by MS.
    -Steve
    Quote Originally Posted by Chain
    Next time, save your energy for tomorrows ride and try not to come in 6th.

  10. #35
    donuts?
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenB
    It's still needlessly complicated.
    it's only complicated because you are trying to put it into a system that is needless complicated and unsecure.

    and to be honest, i don't know too many CIO's that know how to use a computer.

    and what is this dual boot crap. d/l vmplayer and install inside of that.
    -Steve
    Quote Originally Posted by Chain
    Next time, save your energy for tomorrows ride and try not to come in 6th.

  11. #36
    Palm trees & sunshine!
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    Quote Originally Posted by asciibaron
    people will use what is given to them. if i buy a computer and it comes with Win7, i am more likely to use Win7 than i am any other OS. that's why it's such a big deal for MS to control the vendors. don't you remember the big dust up back when XP came out. the vendors were held hostage by MS.

    If I gave my wife or mother a PC with the latest and greatest linux distro on it, they'd simply stop using their computer as much and they'd start whining to have something else put on it. This is why you don't see linux desktops and netbooks selling like hotcakes (or selling much at all). It's not like the hardware manufactures don't want to sell more units by lowering their price with a free operating system. Ask Dell how many consumer systems they sell with linux.

    Linux for the desktop is a geek OS.. for geeks who have the time and compunction to tinker with their OS to get it to work close to how Windows or MacOS does. NTTAWWT, it's just how it is and has been. Maybe in another couple years....



    I've got a bunch of CentOS servers chugging along and will probably be adding more in the next 12 months. THAT is where linux rocks.


    supervillain

  12. #37
    donuts?
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    so computers are appliances now? how sad. WebTV died as did the iOpener....
    -Steve
    Quote Originally Posted by Chain
    Next time, save your energy for tomorrows ride and try not to come in 6th.

  13. #38
    i like whiskey
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    Quote Originally Posted by asciibaron
    so computers are appliances now? how sad. WebTV died as did the iOpener....

    It's not sad. It's the way it should be.

    All the vast majority of people want to do is plug it in, turn it on and use it. They want it to be as simple as that. Just like any other appliance - toaster, dishwasher or computer. Tinkering with settings and trying to wring the nth degree of functionality out of a device is a super niche pasttime at best. If you like to do it, then more power to you.

    If a device turns on and works with a minimum of touching and maintaining, who really cares what operating system something runs. Certainly not me. What op-sys does your home phone system run?

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by innergel
    It's not sad. It's the way it should be.

    All the vast majority of people want to do is plug it in, turn it on and use it. They want it to be as simple as that. Just like any other appliance - toaster, dishwasher or computer. Tinkering with settings and trying to wring the nth degree of functionality out of a device is a super niche pasttime at best. If you like to do it, then more power to you.

    If a device turns on and works with a minimum of touching and maintaining, who really cares what operating system something runs. Certainly not me. What op-sys does your home phone system run?
    The appliance attitude is how we have cars that unless you're just out of gas-you cannot fix without a professional mechanic.

    Almost like when your dishwasher goes bad--it is cheaper to throw away the old one than try to fix it. Thus comes the throw-away society.

    Do you want to know the number of people I have that come into my space to do computer-based presentations...and don't have a flying clue how to operate or set up their own appliance?...and for gawd knows what reason they expect me to know how their machine is set up?
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  15. #40
    i like whiskey
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc
    The appliance attitude is how we have cars that unless you're just out of gas-you cannot fix without a professional mechanic.

    Almost like when your dishwasher goes bad--it is cheaper to throw away the old one than try to fix it. Thus comes the throw-away society.

    Do you want to know the number of people I have that come into my space to do computer-based presentations...and don't have a flying clue how to operate or set up their own appliance?...and for gawd knows what reason they expect me to know how their machine is set up?
    I'm sure the number is high. But that is a business situation. And professionals should know how to use their tools to make their job easier. There's no excuse for not knowing the basics in that instance.

    What I am referring to is home computers, which is what ascii was talking about. They are unnecessarily complicated and the vast majority of users could easily get by with a computer with icons for a) internet b) email and c) some sort of media manager/player. The platform they run on and the actual software they use would be immaterial if they were simple, they all worked together, were not buggy and didn't require an MCSE cert to maintain.

  16. #41
    Seat's not level
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    Quote Originally Posted by asciibaron
    i use computers for other things and here's a nifty trick in Windows. double click the clock in the lower right corner. once you figure out how to display the calendar, click on a date. notice that nothing happens.

    on my computer running Ubuntu 10.04, when i click on the date, it shows me what, if anything, is scheduled. it's just different level of "working"
    .
    I don't need a calendar.... I have a wife.
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  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by innergel
    The platform they run on and the actual software they use would be immaterial if they were simple, they all worked together, were not buggy and didn't require an MCSE cert to maintain.
    It almost is like what you speak of actually.

    There are hundreds of hardware manufacturers, making thousands of products. That result in millions of millions of permutations of configurations. The fact that I can go on NewEgg and buy all the components of a computer sight-unseen, spend an hour or two screwing them together....and have the contraption boot, and throw an OS on it and have a desktop in an afternoon-and have it work a majority of the time is quite frankly astounding.

    You cannot do that with anything other than desktop computers today.

    Most of the time, most setups do not need a great deal of brains to maintain. When something doesn't work however-on Windows/Mac/or *nix it can get fairly involved.

    Windows, with W7 and Vista has gone to giving "This Program has Suffered an Error and Must Close" dialogues that are completely useless to everyone providing no helpful troubleshooting info. If it doesn't "just work" you're in for a helpline...where you are asked if you've tried restarting the computer, and if you know where the power button is.

    Mac has always had unhelpful error messages that no one outside of Apple can make sense of. If it does not "just work" you're sunk and have to call for help. And similarly will get the "you're an idiot" treatment from support.

    The fact is Linux systems are comparatively easy to troubleshoot. Why? All the error info is readily available. With the internet, it is easy to Google your problems as it is massively unlikely that your situation is unique, or get in touch with the guy who wrote the code. It requires a more proactive user willing to help themselves...but the user is only helpless if they choose to be ignorant.
    "Refreshingly Unconcerned With The Vulgar Exigencies Of Veracity "

  18. #43
    I drank what?
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    cool thanks for the advice. I'll make sure it was copied in that format.

  19. #44
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    A lot of good points have been made here. I have been in different levels of IT support for the past 20 years. In the beginning I loved to tinker, configure, break fix and reinstall. As the years have passed and the job I do has changed the less I want to mess with my computer at home. I want to turn it on check my personal email, surf the web, post a little here and maybe find some p()rn. Other than I don't really care because I have to setup peoples networks all day that don't have a clue what an ethernet cable is! When I get home my PC is an appliance, I want to turn it on and use it just like my TV and my microwave. I mess with technology 5 days a week 10-12 hours day. The last thing I want to do at this point in my life plat techie at home.
    Quote Originally Posted by Catzilla;
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  20. #45
    Grey Manrod
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    I think getting laid would be a game changer for you guys.

    \\ Sorry, couldn't resist.

  21. #46
    Palm trees & sunshine!
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    Quote Originally Posted by asciibaron
    and to be honest, i don't know too many CIO's that know how to use a computer.

    First, I want to run the system outside of a VM so I can truly judge performance. Second, if I were going to run either system in a VM, it'd be Win7. And third, dude, please. I've seen some of your posts about your job and, to be honest, for an Exchange monkey, you've got a long way to go before I'd consider hiring you.


    supervillain

  22. #47
    I drank what?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brick Tamland
    I think getting laid would be a game changer for you guys.
    With a women?, how do they work?


  23. #48
    Palm trees & sunshine!
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    Quote Originally Posted by rward325
    A lot of good points have been made here. I have been in different levels of IT support for the past 20 years. In the beginning I loved to tinker, configure, break fix and reinstall. As the years have passed and the job I do has changed the less I want to mess with my computer at home. I want to turn it on check my personal email, surf the web, post a little here and maybe find some p()rn. Other than I don't really care because I have to setup peoples networks all day that don't have a clue what an ethernet cable is! When I get home my PC is an appliance, I want to turn it on and use it just like my TV and my microwave. I mess with technology 5 days a week 10-12 hours day. The last thing I want to do at this point in my life plat techie at home.

    Exactly.


    supervillain

  24. #49
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    Not wanting to come home from working on computer crap all day, and work on more computer crap on the home PC - yes, I can sympathize with that. Having an easy to use appliance for the "normal" stuff at home - yes, I can sympathize with that too. But, with a family of 5 that shares computer resources, multiple computers, printers, etc at home, I end up playing the defacto IT staff at home. And believe me I have fought too many battles over some of the really crappy stuff that MS operating systems implement.

    It's funny that those who seem happy with their MS "appliance" also are the ones who just don't want to bother with that pesky Linux. Possibly it's because you don't notice that your MS system is chewing up all sorts of unnecessary resources doing God knows what. Perhaps you are just used to saying "Ooop, I guess it's time to reboot again!". Or, perhaps you don't mind that you've got to have a continual loop running to check for the latest Windows security updates, and/or dedicate 20% of your computer's resources to running some lame anti-virus software.

    My experience has been that in many ways, Linux does work better. The fact that an open source community created and continues to update it is rather amazing. Even more amazing is that you can get it for FREE. It's achilles heel has always been lack of support of those producing applications, and also much narrower support for new hardware. These are the areas where you have to dig around on the Interwebs a bit to get what you're looking for and do some customization. But again, it constantly amazes me that there is a large and active open source community out there working on such stuff.

  25. #50
    prosciutto corsa
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    I started using Ubuntu (9.04) after my winders machine took a huge blue dump.

    It's been a lot of fun learning about the platform and getting things to work. I even got to play some Windows games on Wine (GTA: SA, TES: Oblivion, HL2, etc.) with some tweaking. I recently discovered Urban Terror (a UT clone) that is native on linux, and I can't get enough.

    I had been using Open Office before Ubuntu, but it's nice that it came bundled with the distro.

    Hard to beat the price, too. ;)

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