Any body using Lynskey Sportive for light touring
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    10

    Any body using Lynskey Sportive for light touring

    I currently use Bianchi Volpe, 28c tyres, for light touring, with Lone Peak panniers front and rear. I'd like to go faster, with lighter loaded bike, and am looking hard at Lynskey Sportive. I'll be carrying rear panniers only, with baggage load <15KG. and on paved road only. Any recommendation? BTW, I weigh 70kg.

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    4,298
    Unless you're looking to have a bike dedicated to a different type of riding such as a touring vs. a racing bike, I wouldn't bother with the Lynskey. They're great frames but a new frame will not appreciably increase your speed, which seems to be what you're looking for.

    I can't see much difference between the two bikes since they'll both have racks. Sure, you can equip the Lynskey with lighter, more road-like wheels and tires, but I don't see that and the Bianchi being different enough in their design to warrant having both bikes.

    I'd recommend you buy an unloaded road bike such as an offering from the Lynskey Sport or Pro series.

    If you want to lighten up the Bianchi, buy a second set of wheels with lighter rims and narrower tires. Cheap and very effective without the cost and other issues of owning a second bike.

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    Unless you're looking to have a bike dedicated to a different type of riding such as a touring vs. a racing bike, I wouldn't bother with the Lynskey. They're great frames but a new frame will not appreciably increase your speed, which seems to be what you're looking for.

    I can't see much difference between the two bikes since they'll both have racks. Sure, you can equip the Lynskey with lighter, more road-like wheels and tires, but I don't see that and the Bianchi being different enough in their design to warrant having both bikes.

    I'd recommend you buy an unloaded road bike such as an offering from the Lynskey Sport or Pro series.

    If you want to lighten up the Bianchi, buy a second set of wheels with lighter rims and narrower tires. Cheap and very effective without the cost and other issues of owning a second bike.
    Thanks for your recommendation. I do own a dedicated carbon frame 6.7kg. road bike. Heeding your advice, would a carbon fork and lighter wheel set for hills on Bianchi Volpe be a good alternative to Lynskey Sportive? I'll have no problem changing the fork back and forth, should I have a trip that calls for front panniers. I enjoy putting up a friendly scrap with road bikies I happen to meet on my trips, or to hound not so strong roadies on dedicated sealed bicycling track around Bangkok Airport.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    4,298
    The carbon fork will be no magic elixir. I see your Bianchi and the Lynskey being too close in purpose, regardless of any weight differences, to be worth owning both, especially since you already own a carbon road bike. Also, I don't know what size fork steerer your Bianchi has, but carbon 'cross forks are known for front brake chatter because it's difficult to make the carbon fork steerer stiff enough in 1" or 1 1/8" diameters. That's why there's been the development of the tapered steerer with very large bottom ends; to provide sufficient stiffness to end the brake chatter problem. I'm assuming you don't experience that problem with your steel fork as steel steerers are usually adequately stiff. If you insist on experimenting with a carbon fork to lighten up the bike, then replace the cantilever brake with a V-brake and you shouldn't have brake chatter problems.

  5. #5
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
    The carbon fork will be no magic elixir. I see your Bianchi and the Lynskey being too close in purpose, regardless of any weight differences, to be worth owning both, especially since you already own a carbon road bike. Also, I don't know what size fork steerer your Bianchi has, but carbon 'cross forks are known for front brake chatter because it's difficult to make the carbon fork steerer stiff enough in 1" or 1 1/8" diameters. That's why there's been the development of the tapered steerer with very large bottom ends; to provide sufficient stiffness to end the brake chatter problem. I'm assuming you don't experience that problem with your steel fork as steel steerers are usually adequately stiff. If you insist on experimenting with a carbon fork to lighten up the bike, then replace the cantilever brake with a V-brake and you shouldn't have brake chatter problems.
    Thanks for your detailed advice. I'll retain the steel fork, since the V-brake will not work as well with the STI shifter.

Similar Threads

  1. Lynskey Sportive vs Lynskey R230
    By dratip in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 10-26-2014, 03:02 PM
  2. Lynskey titanium R230 vs Sportive
    By cleon in forum Endurance Riding
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-10-2011, 06:58 AM
  3. Storck Vision Light or Lynskey Cooper
    By bikracernc in forum Bikes, Frames and Forks
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-09-2009, 11:42 PM
  4. Questions about (light) touring on a not-so-touring bike
    By buck-50 in forum Commuting, Touring and Ride Reports
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-07-2006, 01:52 PM
  5. 32h rims for light touring?
    By Frith in forum Components, Wrenching
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-04-2004, 07:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.