Lynskey R230 Sizing?
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  1. #1
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    Lynskey R230 Sizing?

    I have been riding a new Lynskey R230 since about Feb. I love the bike, but just recently dicsovered a crack in the chainstay tube. I dropped the bike off at the shop yesterday to return to Lynskey (hopefully that all goes smoothly). I have no idea if they will replace the tube or give me a new frame, anyone have any experience with this?

    Anyways, I have been on a M/L at the advice of the fitter I went to see, the shop I ordered from suggested a L. Having had the bike all built up and ridden for sometime, I feel like I could go with either size. On the M/L I have about 3cm of spacers, running a 120mm stem. The fitter I went to was concerned about me being able to get low enough on the L, but according to the geometry it looks like I could ride a L with a 1cm spacer. I really don't see myself getting any lower than a 1cm difference on the bike. Would it make sense to get a L and run a shorter stem. I felt really comfortable with my current setup and am wondering if shortening the stem would change things that much? It is a 1.6cm difference in the top tube lengths.

    Any thoughts? Thanks!

    R230 Titanium Road Bicycle Frame - Lynskey Performance | Titanium Bicycles

  2. #2
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    They are very likely to simply replace the broken parts, which would preclude changing the frame size.

    There doesn't sound like any reason to change frame sizes from what you describe, anyway.
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  3. #3
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    Sorry to hear your chainstay cracked. I had a professional fitting done as well but my R230 isn't here yet - I'm a size M with a 100mm stem (5'9" with long arms/torso and 31" inseam)

    One thought regarding frame sizing, my fittter noted that the longer your stem is, the more forward your weight will be from the cranks (and presumably the power applied will be slightly different to the chainstays). A shorter stem would help you position more of your weight above the cranks. My fitter suggested that 110 is ideal.

    If you are running a 120mm stem, could it be possible that your forward-shifted position strained an already-weak weld on the frame? Comfort-wise it seems like you enjoy the current frame size so I agree with the previous poster that you don't necessarily need to change sizes from a comfort standpoint. I'm thinking about things from a structural standpoint.

    As a new Lynskey owner, I'm looking forward to seeing how Lynskey resolves this. They have good reviews all over so I'm sure they'll make things right. Post back with an update.

  4. #4
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    Out of curiosity. did the chainstay crack mid-tube or at the weld? Also based on the little bit on info you've mentioned about your set up, 120mm stem seems reasonable. Are you having to use a seat post with lots of setback? If so the larger frame may help compensate, hard to say with the info provided.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nestacio View Post
    Sorry to hear your chainstay cracked. I had a professional fitting done as well but my R230 isn't here yet - I'm a size M with a 100mm stem (5'9" with long arms/torso and 31" inseam)

    One thought regarding frame sizing, my fittter noted that the longer your stem is, the more forward your weight will be from the cranks (and presumably the power applied will be slightly different to the chainstays). A shorter stem would help you position more of your weight above the cranks. My fitter suggested that 110 is ideal.

    If you are running a 120mm stem, could it be possible that your forward-shifted position strained an already-weak weld on the frame? Comfort-wise it seems like you enjoy the current frame size so I agree with the previous poster that you don't necessarily need to change sizes from a comfort standpoint. I'm thinking about things from a structural standpoint.

    As a new Lynskey owner, I'm looking forward to seeing how Lynskey resolves this. They have good reviews all over so I'm sure they'll make things right. Post back with an update.
    I think there was a miscommunication between you and the fitter. Long stems (vs. long top tubes) don't move your weight forward from the crank. Both solutions have the identical relationship with the crank because the crank is the starting point for your fit.

    The difference between the two will affect the weight loading between the wheels, because the long stem fit will have a shorter front center than the long top tube fit, moving weight to the front wheel. However, neither is going to put more strain on the frame that can affect its longevity.
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  6. #6
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    I'm at work, so I don't have much time, but the frame cracked on the top and bottom of the chain stay tube, just away from the weld.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
    I think there was a miscommunication between you and the fitter. Long stems (vs. long top tubes) don't move your weight forward from the crank. Both solutions have the identical relationship with the crank because the crank is the starting point for your fit.

    The difference between the two will affect the weight loading between the wheels, because the long stem fit will have a shorter front center than the long top tube fit, moving weight to the front wheel. However, neither is going to put more strain on the frame that can affect its longevity.
    Thank you for this - as I think more about it, it makes sense since we pivot at our waist but our actual weight rests firmly on the saddle and the cranks/pedals. Regarding my sizing, I was coming in at 53 or 53.5cm on his fitting equipment but that length doesn't exist on the R230 so we reduced the stem 10mm to compensate. I'll send him an email to clarify.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ramjm_2000 View Post
    Out of curiosity. did the chainstay crack mid-tube or at the weld? Also based on the little bit on info you've mentioned about your set up, 120mm stem seems reasonable. Are you having to use a seat post with lots of setback? If so the larger frame may help compensate, hard to say with the info provided.
    I am using a straight Thomson post, so no issue there. I just thought I might be able to get rid of some spacers. My seat post is a little high too. I have long legs and relatively short arms, that is why the fitter thought a M/L would be better. I am leaning towards keeping the M/L to keep the 120 stem.

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    Lynskey crack

    hello, long time reader, first time poster. I have recently been very tempted about pulling the trigger on a Lynskey. Hearing about this chainstay tube crack, though, is making me quite concerned. It sounds like the bike is fairly new. Did the OP notice the crack while riding? If so, was there any sort of impact prior to realizing this(e.g. large pothole).

    BTW, how much do you weigh? Even if you're on the heavier side, I can't imagine how weight could be an issue, given Ti's incredible strength. Did you by any chance take a picture of the crack before you sent the frame back to Lynskey?

    I have been debating between Motobecane and Lynskey for a while. Like I had said, I was really close to ordering the Helix when it was on promo, but the the price suddenly skyrocketed one day without warning. But hearing about this tube problem on even the "legendary" Lynskey, I am starting to have serious second doubts. I suppose it is somewhat reassuring that it didn't involve a failed weld, but hearing about an actual bizarre tube crack makes it in some way even more worrisome.

  10. #10
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    Things break. The question is how does the manufacture handle it? Do they stand behind their product? Odds are they will do right by the OP as most custom builders do. These things happen to them all. I had a drop out issue on my old Dean and a misaligned chainstay on my old Moots, both were handled quickly and with minimal fuss.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit123 View Post
    hello, long time reader, first time poster. I have recently been very tempted about pulling the trigger on a Lynskey. Hearing about this chainstay tube crack, though, is making me quite concerned. It sounds like the bike is fairly new. Did the OP notice the crack while riding? If so, was there any sort of impact prior to realizing this(e.g. large pothole).

    BTW, how much do you weigh? Even if you're on the heavier side, I can't imagine how weight could be an issue, given Ti's incredible strength. Did you by any chance take a picture of the crack before you sent the frame back to Lynskey?

    I have been debating between Motobecane and Lynskey for a while. Like I had said, I was really close to ordering the Helix when it was on promo, but the the price suddenly skyrocketed one day without warning. But hearing about this tube problem on even the "legendary" Lynskey, I am starting to have serious second doubts. I suppose it is somewhat reassuring that it didn't involve a failed weld, but hearing about an actual bizarre tube crack makes it in some way even more worrisome.
    Every legendary frame maker has defect frame failures. The measure of a brand is not if they have failures, but how common they are. Secondarily, how they are handled.

    Lynskey breakages appear to be pretty rare, and the lifetime warranty covers them. A Motobecane might break just as inoften, but won't ride as nicely or be covered as long as your lifetime.
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  12. #12
    Juanmoretime
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    I'll third that. I have not broke any of my five Lynskey's and the oldest is almost 4 years old with about 25,000 miles on it. Not only are they rare but Lynskey will complete and turn around the repair pretty quick.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the reassurances. Now if only Lynskey will run another Helix special!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Summit123 View Post
    hello, long time reader, first time poster. I have recently been very tempted about pulling the trigger on a Lynskey. Hearing about this chainstay tube crack, though, is making me quite concerned. It sounds like the bike is fairly new. Did the OP notice the crack while riding? If so, was there any sort of impact prior to realizing this(e.g. large pothole).

    BTW, how much do you weigh? Even if you're on the heavier side, I can't imagine how weight could be an issue, given Ti's incredible strength. Did you by any chance take a picture of the crack before you sent the frame back to Lynskey?

    I have been debating between Motobecane and Lynskey for a while. Like I had said, I was really close to ordering the Helix when it was on promo, but the the price suddenly skyrocketed one day without warning. But hearing about this tube problem on even the "legendary" Lynskey, I am starting to have serious second doubts. I suppose it is somewhat reassuring that it didn't involve a failed weld, but hearing about an actual bizarre tube crack makes it in some way even more worrisome.
    As the other posters said, things break. It was definitely hard for me to stomach when I first found the crack though. I was cleaning my bike, didn't notice anything while riding. I am definitely easy on my equipment compared to some of the riders I have ridden with. Our roads are rough but I haven't hit anything that should cause a frame to crack. When I first got the frame I was probably around 195lbs, now probably 180-185. No pictures, I rushed straight to bike shop. From what I have heard I am expecting Lynskey to fully take care of me.

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    I'm interested in the R230 but feel like I'm a bit in between M and M/L sizes and could go either way depending on how I want the bike to handle.

    I'm 177cm with an 83cm cycling inseam. According to Lynskey's chart I should be on the M/L but I'm usually an M on most other compact or semi-compact geometry bikes.

    My current bike: "M" Giant TCX.
    55.5cm (ST), 545mm TT, 145mm HT, 3-4cm of spacers, 110mm stem

    The R230's:

    (M): 50cm, 541 TT, 145 HT

    (M/L) 52cm, 557 TT, 165 HT

    What would be the pro's and cons of going with the M with 110mm stem and maybe 2-3cm of spacers vs. the M/L with maybe 1cm of spacers and a 100mm stem? It seems like the M/L would handle better and be more comfortable on the centuries I like to ride fairly often but I still want something that feels racy and responsive. I don't want something that is too smooth and predictable, I wouldn't know how to deal with that after coming from an alloy CX bike LOL. Anyway, what would you all recommend?

  16. #16
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    Forget the sizing chart altogether, go by the top tube length that your most comfortable with. I'm an inch taller than you but ride medium Lynkseys (first a L3 Custom, a Helix, and a Cooper CX), but that mean little since you and I are different. Also, keep in mind the difference in road geo vs. CX. My cooper has a TT closer in length to a M/L Helix but the HTA/STA and a straight seatpost pretty much give me a similiar cockpit. I suggest getting fit on a road bike to see which TT length would be better suited to your riding style/flexibility.


    Quote Originally Posted by PaddyB View Post
    I'm interested in the R230 but feel like I'm a bit in between M and M/L sizes and could go either way depending on how I want the bike to handle.

    I'm 177cm with an 83cm cycling inseam. According to Lynskey's chart I should be on the M/L but I'm usually an M on most other compact or semi-compact geometry bikes.

    My current bike: "M" Giant TCX.
    55.5cm (ST), 545mm TT, 145mm HT, 3-4cm of spacers, 110mm stem

    The R230's:

    (M): 50cm, 541 TT, 145 HT

    (M/L) 52cm, 557 TT, 165 HT

    What would be the pro's and cons of going with the M with 110mm stem and maybe 2-3cm of spacers vs. the M/L with maybe 1cm of spacers and a 100mm stem? It seems like the M/L would handle better and be more comfortable on the centuries I like to ride fairly often but I still want something that feels racy and responsive. I don't want something that is too smooth and predictable, I wouldn't know how to deal with that after coming from an alloy CX bike LOL. Anyway, what would you all recommend?
    It never gets easier. You just go faster. Greg LeMond

  17. #17
    Juanmoretime
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    The medium seems like a better fit as Rammin stated. The top tube and head tube are close to your current bike. The M/L would have you on a pretty short stem.
    For my next trick I will now set myself on fire!

  18. #18
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    I am 5' 9" and I ride a medium R230. I just had a Retul bike fit done and was running a stem 2cm too long and had my seatpost 2cm too high and now it fits perfectly...

  19. #19
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    Funny that this thread should come up again, my frame is back at Lynskey because the seat tube was too large and there was just the slightest amount of movement to cause the aluminum sleeve to wear. My first warranty experience took 2 1/2 months, I guess their repair tech was sick. That was understandable to some extent. They were reluctant to take the fame back this time. Due to this recent customer service experience I will never buy a frame from them again. I love the way the frame rides, but there are too many other frame builders out there for me to even come close to considering buying another Lynskey.

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