Lynskey warranty/customer service - Page 3
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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by rgordin View Post
    I couldn't understand why subsequent posts missed yours. I thought you did a good job of addressing the issues raised and that it was a wise thing to do.
    thank you. Never want anyone to think we hide from conversations about our bikes, whether on forums or thru our normal channels on the website or phone. We do our best to stay on top of trends and new product introductions, and make adjustments to meet customer expectations as quickly and completely as we can. enjoy whatever you ride.

    Don Erwin

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYCfixie View Post
    This entire conversation is stupid.

    As a three time Lynskey Owner (2010 Sportive, 2011 R230, and 2011 CooperCX), I have found the company and its employees to be extremely accommodating each and every time I work with them pre and post sales. Yes, you can think they are just trying to sell me more bikes, but at some point I am not going to need any more so I see their support as an amazing part of the experience of being in the "Lynskey Family".

    !
    I frequent other cycling forums besides this one, and your reply in regards to Lynskey being an amazing experience ECHO's...echo's the responses I've read from other owners, in fact I've never read a negative report which is rare in today's world.

    If I had the extra cash to buy a Lynskey Cooper similarly equipped as a Motobecane TI Team I would do that without thinking about it.

    Like I mentioned before when Lynskey was in control of Litespeed they too had an excellent reputation, I even a knew a lady who owned a Blade that ripped at the water bottle boss and Litespeed, under the direction of Lynskey at the time, replaced the frame no questions asked. The new Blade she's had for many years without any more issues, we never found out what caused it other then some sort of manufacturing issue, we thought the tube may have been milled to thin at the boss area, and Litespeed nor Lysnkey mills the tubes, they buy the tubes then their cut to make a frame.

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by armybikerider View Post
    In the midst of so many ABG warranty fiascos, both on this forum and others that I've seen, I just had to give Lynskey a little publicity for their warranty service.

    The paint on the head tube badge on my 2009 R330 is starting to peel very slightly. I emailed them and the next day I received an email telling me a new badge was on the way.

    David
    I suppose I should make a comment - Most Ti builders are small builders and they cannot afford "great warranty service" and you'll get a fight for anything outside of something unarguably their fault. This is why I choose not to do business with small builders no matter how much respect I might have for their products. If you buy their products just be ready to have long waiting periods and possible arguments about causes and exact problems. On the other hand - have a problem with a Trek and POOF you have a new one.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    I suppose I should make a comment - Most Ti builders are small builders and they cannot afford "great warranty service" and you'll get a fight for anything outside of something unarguably their fault. This is why I choose not to do business with small builders no matter how much respect I might have for their products. If you buy their products just be ready to have long waiting periods and possible arguments about causes and exact problems. On the other hand - have a problem with a Trek and POOF you have a new one.
    That's great IF you want a Trek. Last I checked Trek doesn't produce or sell titanium frames.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    I suppose I should make a comment - Most Ti builders are small builders and they cannot afford "great warranty service" and you'll get a fight for anything outside of something unarguably their fault. This is why I choose not to do business with small builders no matter how much respect I might have for their products. If you buy their products just be ready to have long waiting periods and possible arguments about causes and exact problems. On the other hand - have a problem with a Trek and POOF you have a new one.
    POOF did you say? A friend of mine had a problem with a CF frame cracking and Trek said it wasn't covered due to normal wear and tear which is excluded from their warranty; his bike was 5 or 6 years old; this is similar to what happened to be with another company after 14 months and 8,000 miles my Scandium frame cracked, they got out their warranty too by saying it was fatigue.

    If a company can get out of the warranty they'll get out of it, just read their warranties and you'll see what's covered and not covered.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by armybikerider View Post
    That's great IF you want a Trek. Last I checked Trek doesn't produce or sell titanium frames.
    There is a very good reason for that. On the whole carbon fiber is a much better material. Properly made it is much longer lived, lighter and far more easy to design "the perfect bike". My Emonda and Madone are the closest thing to perfect as I've owned in 40 years or more of riding. I was NOT impressed with my Colnago Bititan or another titanium Colnago that had an oversize downtube to try and keep the damn thing from flexing all over the place and failed.

    I don't wish to knock small time builders because many people are quite satisfied with their products. People like Lynsky in particular are very well respected. But you notice that our friend that started this string never came back to describe how everything was resolved. I would bet that it was more a communications error and a bike shop that wasn't very good.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    There is a very good reason for that. On the whole carbon fiber is a much better material. Properly made it is much longer lived, lighter and far more easy to design "the perfect bike". My Emonda and Madone are the closest thing to perfect as I've owned in 40 years or more of riding. I was NOT impressed with my Colnago Bititan or another titanium Colnago that had an oversize downtube to try and keep the damn thing from flexing all over the place and failed.

    I don't wish to knock small time builders because many people are quite satisfied with their products. People like Lynsky in particular are very well respected. But you notice that our friend that started this string never came back to describe how everything was resolved. I would bet that it was more a communications error and a bike shop that wasn't very good.
    I disagree that CF lasts the longest, we still have steel bikes that are over 100 years old still around, Sheldon Brown use to commute everyday on a 1918 Ranger (if I recall the year and make correctly) for years; we have tons of steel bikes from the 40's on up still kicking around just fine, you let me know how that turns out with CF...of course you and I are going be dead before either one us can prove the other wrong...LOL! But I know one professional bike mechanic where I live who's been doing bike mechanics for over 30 years, and he's seen a lot more failed CF bike frames than he ever saw of any other material, he won't buy a CF bike, and he works for a shop that sells them! That's all I'm going to say about it with you or anyone else, and there is a lot more I can say about it, but I don't want to get into a pissing war here, Road Bike Review doesn't need that happening.

    I haven't climbed mountains for 20 years so I lost my mountain legs, in addition to age, all I can tell you is that I can't get my lowend Lynskey Peloton to flex in a matter that is noticeable to me.

  8. #58
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    We could argue this all day long and then some....and in the end we'll agree to disagree.

    "On the whole carbon fiber is a much better material." Says who? And I'm sorry but the word "better" is subjective and only relevant to the person that said it. Your better may not be my better.

    My 2009 Lynskey R331 has 68,900+ miles and is still going strong after 10 years. It IS NOT flexy and I think "better" than any plastic bike I've ever ridden, in my 40 years of riding.

    But the bike that I'm really waiting for is my new custom Chris Bishop. Oh but then you don't like "small time builders" so you wouldn't be interested in a new steel bike, made to order in a fast road geometry with room for 30's.

    I. Can't. Wait.

    So no plastic, I mean carbon fiber for me thank you very much. I'll take hand made metal any and every day of the week.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by armybikerider View Post
    We could argue this all day long and then some....and in the end we'll agree to disagree.

    "On the whole carbon fiber is a much better material." Says who? And I'm sorry but the word "better" is subjective and only relevant to the person that said it. Your better may not be my better.

    My 2009 Lynskey R331 has 68,900+ miles and is still going strong after 10 years. It IS NOT flexy and I think "better" than any plastic bike I've ever ridden, in my 40 years of riding.

    But the bike that I'm really waiting for is my new custom Chris Bishop. Oh but then you don't like "small time builders" so you wouldn't be interested in a new steel bike, made to order in a fast road geometry with room for 30's.

    I. Can't. Wait.

    So no plastic, I mean carbon fiber for me thank you very much. I'll take hand made metal any and every day of the week.
    I test rode at least a dozen different CF bikes including the Specialized one that had the Zertz inserts, the Specialized was indeed the most comfortable of all the CF bikes I rode, but 2 friends of mine had TI bikes, one was a low end Motobecane, and the other was a high end Serotta, both felt superior to any of the CF bikes in comfort. Both the Moto and the Serotta had what I thought were noodly CF forks which is the second reason I went with the Enve 2.0 fork, and my friend with the Moto last year switched his fork to a Enve 2.0 and is totally happy with how the front end feels now; the other guy had his Serotta for awhile and liked how his CF fork felt.

    That is a problem with TI bikes is that you have to use a CF fork, but it's the main reason I went with the 2.0 because while the 1.0 was a bit lighter it held a 224 pound rider, the 3.0 was good for 350 pounds, and even though I weigh 170 pounds I wanted to make sure the fork was over engineered for my weight which in turn would be more reliable over the long haul, I guess I'll find out. I also opted for a Cane Creek 110 headset because it supposedly supports the steerer tube better, not sure if that's true but I thought why not?

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by froze View Post
    I disagree that CF lasts the longest, we still have steel bikes that are over 100 years old still around, Sheldon Brown use to commute everyday on a 1918 Ranger (if I recall the year and make correctly) for years; we have tons of steel bikes from the 40's on up still kicking around just fine, you let me know how that turns out with CF...of course you and I are going be dead before either one us can prove the other wrong...LOL! But I know one professional bike mechanic where I live who's been doing bike mechanics for over 30 years, and he's seen a lot more failed CF bike frames than he ever saw of any other material, he won't buy a CF bike, and he works for a shop that sells them! That's all I'm going to say about it with you or anyone else, and there is a lot more I can say about it, but I don't want to get into a pissing war here, Road Bike Review doesn't need that happening.

    I haven't climbed mountains for 20 years so I lost my mountain legs, in addition to age, all I can tell you is that I can't get my lowend Lynskey Peloton to flex in a matter that is noticeable to me.
    Because there are old steel bikes doesn't mean that carbon fiber isn't longer lived properly made.

    I absolutely agree that there are very few places in which you can flex any bike enough to be disturbing but there are several places around here. And it isn't a welcome thing to have the bike doing 40+ mph and have the steering grow light.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Because there are old steel bikes doesn't mean that carbon fiber isn't longer lived properly made.

    I absolutely agree that there are very few places in which you can flex any bike enough to be disturbing but there are several places around here. And it isn't a welcome thing to have the bike doing 40+ mph and have the steering grow light.
    What bike were you on that the steering grew light? I've gone 58 mph down Tram Way in Palm Springs Calif on a steel bike and the bike never felt light. Racing pros have exceeded 75 mph many times on all sorts of materials over the 100 plus years that race has been ran, and I never heard anyone complain the steering went light. I took my Lynskey to Pittsburgh and found myself doing 48 going down one of their many hills and never felt the bike going light.

    So you have to explain that further.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by froze View Post
    What bike were you on that the steering grew light? I've gone 58 mph down Tram Way in Palm Springs Calif on a steel bike and the bike never felt light. Racing pros have exceeded 75 mph many times on all sorts of materials over the 100 plus years that race has been ran, and I never heard anyone complain the steering went light. I took my Lynskey to Pittsburgh and found myself doing 48 going down one of their many hills and never felt the bike going light.

    So you have to explain that further.
    I have absolutely no idea what you think you're talking about. Bumps at speed is what I'm talking about. Going down a straight road sure isn't any accomplishment.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    I have absolutely no idea what you think you're talking about. Bumps at speed is what I'm talking about. Going down a straight road sure isn't any accomplishment.
    what are you talking about? I use to race in mountains all over So Calif, those roads were far from smooth, and Tramway wasn't smooth when I went down it, ruts and cracked pavement from the heat, I'm sure they've probably paved it several times since i've been down it. But you don't possibly think that the guy in the TDF are riding down straight smooth roads do you? And neither were back roads of S Calif mountains either.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by armybikerider View Post
    We could argue this all day long and then some....and in the end we'll agree to disagree.

    "On the whole carbon fiber is a much better material." Says who? And I'm sorry but the word "better" is subjective and only relevant to the person that said it. Your better may not be my better.

    My 2009 Lynskey R331 has 68,900+ miles and is still going strong after 10 years. It IS NOT flexy and I think "better" than any plastic bike I've ever ridden, in my 40 years of riding.

    But the bike that I'm really waiting for is my new custom Chris Bishop. Oh but then you don't like "small time builders" so you wouldn't be interested in a new steel bike, made to order in a fast road geometry with room for 30's.

    I. Can't. Wait.

    So no plastic, I mean carbon fiber for me thank you very much. I'll take hand made metal any and every day of the week.
    Why would I want some small time builder when I have my Lemond Zurich made from oversize Reynolds 853 and made by Trek? It is nice that you're willing to put your life into the hands of some builder that you could never make any recovery from if they do a crappy job but I had enough of that from IRS (A rather large Italian company whose response to their carbon fiber fork having one leg that wasn't even glued onto the crown was "We didn't advertise in the US so we are not liable"). Now I have the rest of my life to take anti-seizure medication and not be able to feel the front half of my feet. I have very little balance and need to maintain a visual horizon or I can fall down. My riding without a lock-down is reduced to 5 or 6 thousand miles a year and only 200,000 feet of climbing. But then I suppose at 75 that might happen to anyone.

    And I never figured that I would keep some bike for 11 years unless it was the best there is. I ride with a group and one of them purchased a new Lynsky. He was rather proud of it with one of the first Di2 set-ups. From across the street I could see a failed weld and pointed it out to him. Lynsky didn't argue with him but I don't know how you could since the top tube weld to the head tube failed and the crack extended into the head tube for an inch.

    Now, of course your welds might last forever. But all it takes is a sand grain size spot of titanium oxide in a weld to expand into an entire fractured weld over time.

    As for custom built steel bikes: I saw one where the builder forgot to braze one lug altogether and it was hidden by a rather nice paint job for 2 months or so before it failed. Luckily it was the seat-tube bottom bracket lug and control wasn't too badly compromised and he could even ride it home. "Gee, I'm sorry" isn't going to hack it if you are killed because of such a failure.
    Last edited by Tom Kunich; 06-21-2020 at 06:18 AM.

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Why would I want some small time builder when I have my Lemond Zurich made from oversize Reynolds 853 and made by Trek? It is nice that you're willing to put your life into the hands of some builder that you could never make any recovery from if they do a crappy job but I had enough of that from IRS (A rather large Italian company whose response to their carbon fiber fork having one leg that wasn't even glued onto the crown was "We didn't advertise in the US so we are not liable"). Now I have the rest of my life to take anti-seizure medication and not be able to feel the front half of my feet. I have very little balance and need to maintain a visual horizon or I can fall down. My riding without a lock-down is reduced to 5 or 6 thousand miles a year and only 200,000 feet of climbing. But then I suppose at 75 that might happen to anyone.

    And I never figured that I would keep some bike for 11 years unless it was the best there is. I ride with a group and one of them purchased a new Lynsky. He was rather proud of it with one of the first Di2 set-ups. From across the street I could see a failed weld and pointed it out to him. Lynsky didn't argue with him but I don't know how you could since the top tube weld to the head tube failed and the crack extended into the head tube for an inch.

    Now, of course your welds might last forever. But all it takes is a sand grain size spot of titanium oxide in a weld to expand into an entire fractured weld over time.

    As for custom built steel bikes: I saw one where the builder forgot to braze one lug altogether and it was hidden by a rather nice paint job for 2 months or so before it failed. Luckily it was the seat-tube bottom bracket lug and control wasn't too badly compromised and he could even ride it home. "Gee, I'm sorry" isn't going to hack it if you are killed because of such a failure.
    I thought there is something wrong with you, and yup, I'm right! You just like to argue nonsense with whomever. maybe it's your age playing games with you, maybe it's that crash you had that scrambled your mind, (sorry about the crash, unfortunate crap happens), either all that or you're just a grumpy old man.

    First you started in on me about some smooth road nonsense, now you're telling people that small builders aren't worth a damn and only large builders like Trek is...this is completely laughable. You obviously know very little about Lynskey or you would have never said what you said, Lynskey got was a pioneer in the US for building stuff out of titanium, and he was and still is the best, he became so well appreciated he was contacted by the US government and later by NASA to build various projects with titanium for the space program. In 1984 he decided to branch off and make titanium bicycles for production, so he created and founded Litespeed, where the technology and techniques he developed and used to build TI bikes became the text book for ALL other TI builders that followed him including the real expensive builders. He sold Litespeed only to have a rift developed between the new owners so Lynskey instead of retiring open another TI bike manufacture to compete against Litespeed and called it Lynskey.

    If you go to Litespeed's website and read all about the history of Litespeed (which they fail to give any credit to Lynskey on their website) but ALL, and I mean ALL of those innovations were by Lynskey. Lynskey created Lynskey company with more of an eye toward the upper masses, so they make their bikes a bit cheaper than they use to with Litespeed that marketed toward the upper few instead of the upper masses. Doesn't mean Lynskey makes bad bikes whatsoever, but there was no one making TI bikes that upper masses could afford, so Lynskey changed that.

    Any bike can have a problem, I sort of doubt the story you said because I seriously don't believe the owner would have missed a failed weld point with a crack, nor do I believe you could see that from across the street. I've seen failed Trek bikes too, so even if you are telling the truth, what does it prove? Not a damn thing.

  16. #66
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    I'm not impressed with you in the slightest. Like all of these groups there are the people who like to think themselves heroes. You aren't. You're the guy who has to post on every subject because you're the group hero. I just went out for a couple of hours and put in 25 miles and 2,000 ft of climbing. Since nothing is open and you can't stop anywhere for a break and coffee I can't do my usual distances and climbs.

    But at least I'm not posting with a picture like you are. That pretty much matches your posting personality.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    I'm not impressed with you in the slightest. Like all of these groups there are the people who like to think themselves heroes. You aren't. You're the guy who has to post on every subject because you're the group hero. I just went out for a couple of hours and put in 25 miles and 2,000 ft of climbing. Since nothing is open and you can't stop anywhere for a break and coffee I can't do my usual distances and climbs.

    But at least I'm not posting with a picture like you are. That pretty much matches your posting personality.
    I'm sorry you feel left out of the hero's club, it's exclusive, and since I am a hero all the coffee shops open when they see me come by. You got me on the mountains because I don't have any where I live now, but I did do a 70 mile ride today with 75 pounds of gear and bike and no coffee just to see if I could...but heros do that sort of stuff you know.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kunich View Post
    Why would I want some small time builder when I have my Lemond Zurich made from oversize Reynolds 853 and made by Trek? It is nice that you're willing to put your life into the hands of some builder that you could never make any recovery from if they do a crappy job but I had enough of that from IRS (A rather large Italian company whose response to their carbon fiber fork having one leg that wasn't even glued onto the crown was "We didn't advertise in the US so we are not liable"). Now I have the rest of my life to take anti-seizure medication and not be able to feel the front half of my feet. I have very little balance and need to maintain a visual horizon or I can fall down. My riding without a lock-down is reduced to 5 or 6 thousand miles a year and only 200,000 feet of climbing. But then I suppose at 75 that might happen to anyone.

    And I never figured that I would keep some bike for 11 years unless it was the best there is. I ride with a group and one of them purchased a new Lynsky. He was rather proud of it with one of the first Di2 set-ups. From across the street I could see a failed weld and pointed it out to him. Lynsky didn't argue with him but I don't know how you could since the top tube weld to the head tube failed and the crack extended into the head tube for an inch.

    Now, of course your welds might last forever. But all it takes is a sand grain size spot of titanium oxide in a weld to expand into an entire fractured weld over time.

    As for custom built steel bikes: I saw one where the builder forgot to braze one lug altogether and it was hidden by a rather nice paint job for 2 months or so before it failed. Luckily it was the seat-tube bottom bracket lug and control wasn't too badly compromised and he could even ride it home. "Gee, I'm sorry" isn't going to hack it if you are killed because of such a failure.
    I've had enough of the chest thumping bull ****. I've got no time for you or this forum. I'm out of here!

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by armybikerider View Post
    I've had enough of the chest thumping bull ****. I've got no time for you or this forum. I'm out of here!
    Don't go just ignore him, he went by another name on another forum called CyclingTom, and that's what he did, day in and day out, I left that forum because of him, but we can't just leave every forum or there be none left for us to go to.

    So stick around and just put him on the ignore list, so that's what I did on the other forum, I went back and ignored him. He is an expert at getting people pissed off but knows very little about cycling though he'll pretend he does and comes up with all sorts of stuff like he wrote the white paper about how helmets don't do anything, just weird stuff he'll come up with. He can control himself because he eventually, after a very long time, went up against a Mod and got kicked off for 6 months, but he's back and being sane there so far. So he does this for fun, because if he can be sane at another forum he can be sane here.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by froze View Post
    So stick around and just put him on the ignore list.............
    Or just make more popcorn.
    "COMPLACENCY IS LETHAL - VOTE in November." - System Shock.

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    bicycles in particular, you need to separate between what's merely true and what's important."
    -- DCGriz, RBR.





  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by froze View Post
    Don't go just ignore him, he went by another name on another forum called CyclingTom, and that's what he did, day in and day out, I left that forum because of him, but we can't just leave every forum or there be none left for us to go to.

    So stick around and just put him on the ignore list, so that's what I did on the other forum, I went back and ignored him. He is an expert at getting people pissed off but knows very little about cycling though he'll pretend he does and comes up with all sorts of stuff like he wrote the white paper about how helmets don't do anything, just weird stuff he'll come up with. He can control himself because he eventually, after a very long time, went up against a Mod and got kicked off for 6 months, but he's back and being sane there so far. So he does this for fun, because if he can be sane at another forum he can be sane here.
    Thanks. Ignore activated.

    Anyone wonder why I have only posted 66 times in 11 years?? It's because of a$$holes like him.

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