DairyLand Dare, Dodgeville Wi
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  1. #1

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    DairyLand Dare, Dodgeville Wi

    The ride organizer (Stewart) called down a 4th of July pre-ride of the 100k portion of the Dairyland Dare ride.

    This will be August 11... http://www.dairylanddare.com/

    Last year I did the Horribly Hilly 200k, and it was nice. This year, the HHH filled up in four hours. People I know who got in either volunteered last year, volunteered this year with the pre-ride duties, or spent hours hitting the return buttion trying to get on the overloaded server.

    The HHH area gets a lot of bike traffic. It's beautiful, close to Madison, and the Midwest Ironman routes through Mount Horeb. Lots of bike traffic, and not all the locals are thrilled about it. It's not hostile, but... there ARE a lot of organized rides going through the area.

    Dodgeville is just about 20 miles west. The hills seem to be generally much longer, and a degree or two less steep. Don't take off your triple or 12x27 just yet! Most of the 100k ride was very rural- cows, horses, trees, corn, farms. Lovely. There was very little traffic, and the people seemed very friendly.

    I'll be doing the 200k as a nice challenging day tour. The 100k was no sissy ride. I know a few guys who finished the 300k last year and they are big hairy animals. They can have it, I'll take my shoes off for lunch and if the riders are anything like the people who showed up to pre-ride... I'll have a nice time meeting lots of really nice folks.

    There is still room. Check it out.

  2. #2

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    Thanks for the kind words.

    (This is Stew)
    I just confirmed with Jeff from Accu-Split that he can support us in a different kind of chip timing. I wondered what people think.

    Here's the scoop. The start / finish is the same as any event with an antenna loop that captures your time when you cross. BUT, at the rest stops, we will have an entry shoot and an exit shoot. The time spent in the rest stop will be subtracted from total time.

    SO, for those who care about such things, you will have a total time, and a ride time metric. I'm hoping that it will take the edge off and allow people to relax a little more during the event.

    I rode the HHH this year. It was the first year without chip timing and people seemed much more at ease. I'm hoping to hit some middle ground and please everyone.
    Any thoughts?

  3. #3

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    Chip timing

    Hey Stew!

    My $25 Planet Bike cycle spedometer keeps track of elapsed time on the bike. My watch has a timer, or we could all just roll out at 6:30am and see what time people cross the finish line. Or riders could just jot down their start time on their number with a sharpie pen.

    I'm not interested in the clock. I am out to have a good time! Okay, 200K of Dodgeville Hills is a nice challenge- but the challenge for us is to enjoy the ride through unfamiliar scenery, and finish feeling okay and not all beat to hell.

    The only reason I can think to have chips is to call it a race, then many team riders would get race paybacks. To me, no chips means two less things to hold up the line- getting and returning chips.

    I'm a bike racer, not triathlete. I LIKE to ride with people! In a bike race, it's not about time or doing your personal best, it's about WINNING. Why bust your butt to win by an hour when you can win by a second? So much depends on weather and how a pack forms and rides together. So.. I'm out to have a good time, enjoy the spectacular scenery and a beautiful and undeveloped rural and hilly part of Wisconsin... where the locals sometimes even seem HAPPY to see bikes on the road!

    So far, none of my friends or team mates are talking much about the Dare. Everyone is sort of nervous about it.
    "You doing the 'Dare?"
    "Uh... yea. How far you going?"
    "200k, that's enough!"
    "I was thinking of 260k, but don't want to get killed. Dino is doing the 300."
    "Fine, he's an amimal! I'm stinking with 200k and meeting some nice folk and having a great day on the bike."
    "Oh yeah, just have fun! Maybe I'll try that."

    Rather than chip timing, how about some instructions for the triathletes on how to ride like cyclists? I think chips draw the triathletes

    1) Lube your chain!
    2) 12x27, or you're going to burn out
    3) NO AEROBARS grinding at 6mph up hill!
    4) Don't ride in the middle of the road in a stupor, please.
    5) Practice riding smooth and practice pack skills, work together and enjoy drafting. It's LEGAL!
    6) You can talk to other riders!

  4. #4

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    I'll survey the riders after this year's event and see what they think. I agree that if you are setting personal goals all you need is a POS computer or a watch.

    From the standpoint of ride organization, chip timing avoids the hazzards and congestion of a mass start. If timing is important to the participants, chip timing is the way to go.

    I don't even have a POS computer on my bike anymore. But people probably get tired of me asking, "How far have we gone now"?

  5. #5

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    Gearing question...
    So I have a compact crank (50/34) in your opinions would that be enough with a 12-25 cassette or should I get a 12-27 for the Dare?

    Fitness wise I avg. 18-19 on a flat course to give you an idea...

    Thanks!

  6. #6

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    From : http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears/

    With a 700x23C tire,
    34T chainwheel and a 23T sprocket = 38.8 gear inches
    39T chainwheel and a 27T sprocket = 38.0 gear inches

    34T chainwheel and a 25T sprocket = 35.7 gear inches
    34T chainwheel and a 27T sprocket = 33.1 gear inches

    So the question becomes, "Do you want one extra low gear or two?"

    I choose two on my bike. On the flatland, I love my 50x34 with an 11-21 cassette.

  7. #7
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    I just completely lost it!

    Spitting coffee on my computer screen and laughing out loud!! Are you freakin' kidding me about an entry and exit chute so time spent at rest stops is subtracted out? Reminds me of a couple years ago when it took me just over four hours for the HHH 100k (Total time) and guys that finsihed two hours after me were claiming the same finishing time. What a joke. If you stop it still counts toward your total time. Ditch the chips or start handing out cash to the "winners" and call it a race.

  8. #8

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    This Is Your Chance To Ride The Infamous Shop Hill Road!

    I'm leading a training ride this Saturday out of Tower Hill State Park.
    The rollout time will be 8:00 AM from the park. This ride is self supported, self paced and costs you nothing.

    The intent is to preview about 100K of the 200K route.
    The route is basically the red arrows on this map: http://www.dairylanddare.com/dairyla...00_200_map.pdf

    THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO RIDE THE INFAMOUS SHOP HILL ROAD! (on fresh legs)

    There has been a bridge outage on Norwegian Hollow road, and I'm owed a call back from the construction engineer with an update on completion.
    We may need to detour around the bridge.

    I'm told that the Clyde Cafe is in operation, so bring a few bucks for a bagel or coffee.

    Afterwards, we may cruise into Spring Green for lunch at the General Store.

    RSVP [email protected]

    -Stew

  9. #9

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    Totally FANTASTIC Ride!

    I did the Dairyland Dare yesterday, and... HAT'S OFF TO THE ORGANIZERS!

    You can have the Horribly Hilly Hundreds, I'm hooked on the Dairyland Dare.

    The hills are a bit longer, and there are not so many uber-steep hills... but there are a few that will have you poppping wheelies, just for a change of pace. Oh, Robertson Road the SECOND time was not exactly a funny joke... ow. Many of the climbs seem to have more SHADE, which makes all the difference in the afternnon. Less traffic... I was passed by more sag vehicles than cars.

    The hills generally RUN OUT... I like to climb, but having done all that work I like to enjoy a nice long and fast downhill!

    The food and volunteers were top notch. I mean, a guy cooks you your dinner to order at the end of the ride? Fresh pasta? We were stunned at how good dinner was.

    If you want more challenge, the 266 and 300k rides are there... but not for me. We chose to ride this as a fun and challenging fast tour, and enjoyed ourselves thoroughly. Even a little suffering.

    Dogmeat
    34x27 and I used all of it, a lot. Esp in the last 30 miles when I was running out of steam. Mid-pack Cat5 racer

  10. #10
    kg1
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    Agreed, very well done

    This is probably the best organized ride I've done -- from the communications leading up to the ride to the ride itself. Food, signage, the attitudes of the volunteers, the chip timing, the route and the scenery, everything was top notch.

    Thanks for a great time, and I'll certainly be back next year.

    kg1

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