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  1. #276
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post

    So I guess I'm in the club.
    Still riding my 2008 Compact.
    It is on it's 3rd groupset and 6th set of wheels.
    Just took it on a trip through Vietnam from Hanoi down to Hoian (950km over 9 days of riding).

    Great bike.

    Moots Registry-received_976738779155069.jpg

  2. #277
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    Honestly, I looked at the Compact and thought it had the vast majority of what I like in a bike. External cable routing, English thread bottom bracket, clean lines... It's likely going to be the bike I reach for the most- especially for travel and general riding.

    I've been riding around with some pretty clunky wheels (36 spoke Open Pros) for early-season riding, but I'm thinking of throwing on a nice set and seeing what she'll do.

  3. #278
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post
    I'm thinking of throwing on a nice set and seeing what she'll do.
    I have run DA laced to OP's, Fulcrum 1's, Mad Fiber's, White Industries laced to H Plus Son and lots of other wheels.
    Currently running Hope hubs laced to Velocity A23's (28 spoke front and 32 rear). They feel great and I love that Hope freewheel sound (especially as I crested a 10km climb in Vietnam).

  4. #279
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    I have a set of 1st Gen HED Kermesses and some A23s, so I might look at a set of Belgium Plus rims with some nicer hubs. It's been a while since I invested in a nice set of non-carbon wheels. Most of my non-race wheels are built for durability and reliability, not necessarily having the smoothest bearings or freehub. I tend to beat them up a bit.

  5. #280
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    Just as a follow-up:
    As I suspected, the Compact became my go-to ride. I even raced it instead of my normal Madones in a windy crit. I'm still dialing it in, but I'm already planning a few component upgrades. It's just a fun, versatile bike. Will it replace my race rides? No, but it will see a lot more miles than the plastic bikes.

    I finally got around to finishing the test build on the Vamoots DR, and it's a fun bike as well- in a completely different way. It's just smooth and stable, providing a lot of mile-eating comfort. It's not super-responsive or light, but it's a nice ride just the same. Maybe not a workhorse like the Compact, but definitely a bike I'd grab when town sign sprints or serious climbing is on the menu. As I get fatter and slower, I see more of those rides in my future.

    I'm coming to the end of a two week trip that includes daily rides on the Blue Ridge Parkway (within spitting distance of my folks' farm) outside of Roanoke. The Compact has been the right tool for the job, and has gotten far more second looks than any of the various super-bikes I've owned over the years. A ten-year old titanium bike from eBay gets more street cred than the finest Taiwanese plastic. Go figure.

  6. #281
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post
    Just as a follow-up:
    As I suspected, the Compact became my go-to ride. I even raced it instead of my normal Madones in a windy crit. I'm still dialing it in, but I'm already planning a few component upgrades. It's just a fun, versatile bike. Will it replace my race rides? No, but it will see a lot more miles than the plastic bikes.

    I finally got around to finishing the test build on the Vamoots DR, and it's a fun bike as well- in a completely different way. It's just smooth and stable, providing a lot of mile-eating comfort. It's not super-responsive or light, but it's a nice ride just the same. Maybe not a workhorse like the Compact, but definitely a bike I'd grab when town sign sprints or serious climbing is on the menu. As I get fatter and slower, I see more of those rides in my future.

    I'm coming to the end of a two week trip that includes daily rides on the Blue Ridge Parkway (within spitting distance of my folks' farm) outside of Roanoke. The Compact has been the right tool for the job, and has gotten far more second looks than any of the various super-bikes I've owned over the years. A ten-year old titanium bike from eBay gets more street cred than the finest Taiwanese plastic. Go figure.
    Mine was always my Crit and race bike when I was racing.

  7. #282
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    Attachment 323427
    Still playing around with the Moots Compact build. Installed an ENVE seatpost and stem tonight and put on the 25mm rims to see how I liked them. I have ENVE SES bars on the way because Iím not 100% happy with the Easton EC90 on there now. eBay and I are a bad combination.

    May jump in the last crit of the season on it just to see how she does. My fitness isn't there, but it should be interesting.

  8. #283
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    Gave her a bit of a makeover.
    New headset, got rid of the pink and blue bits.
    Built her some new wheels (Bicycle Hub store hubs laved to Pacenti Forza rims, 28h rear, 24 spoke front with CX Sprint spokes).
    Aerozine skewers, and top spacer.
    Ceramic hub bearings, front and rear.
    Considering changing out the bars to a traditional shape, but not sure.

    Moots Registry-20181012_091154.jpg

    Moots Registry-20181012_091218.jpg

  9. #284
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    Just passed on my Vamoots DR, which I never really warmed up to (not the bike's fault) and picked up a late-model Vamoots RSL frameset (non-disc) to start building up. I was still kicking myself for not snapping up a Compact SL this fall when I had the chance, so I decided I wasn't going to let the next opportunity slip by.

    The build will be very similar to the one I used for the Compact.

    The plan now is for the Compact to be my everyday, do everything ride (such poverty!) and the RSL will be for racing and other events. There's a large chance I will be purging much of my plastic bike collection in the somewhat near future. They were already collecting dust...

  10. #285
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    60cm Moots Routt RSL with Birch finish.

    Picture was taken right off the build stand. The cockpit if still pending final setup.

    Ultegra 8000 Di2 groupset, Enve compact bars and road stem, Canyon VCLS leafspring seatpost, Selle Italia Novus Boost Gravel saddle.

    Cane Creek eeWings Titanium crank, Hope RX4 front caliper, and a slightly shorter Enve stem are still pending install.


    Of note on this bike. I had been discussing the bike with Moots and my local dealer for quite some time, but I never pulled the trigger due to reservations about the 31.8mm seatpost they built it with. I was pretty adamant about running a 27.2 mm seatpost for compliance purposes. They wouldn't do it, even as a custom option.

    They apparently decided to change the spec of the bike, and as of this bike, all Routt RSL's will come with a 27.2mm seatpost. Once I learned this was the case, I placed my order, and received the bike 7 weeks later.
    Last edited by Finx; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:57 PM.

  11. #286
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    60cm Moots Routt RSL with Birch finish.
    Very nice. I think the 27.2mm seatpost on a gravel bike makes too much sense. I don't mind the larger diameter on my Vamoots RSL, but I wouldn't have complained about a thinner one, either. Did you consider the ENVE gravel bars? I've been really liking the flared drops on their SES bars and how the stem/bar combo really attenuates road vibrations compared to the Easton aero bars I was using before.

    I just acquired my second Moots Compact, and this one is getting S&S couplers for the frequent travel I do these days.

  12. #287
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post
    Very nice. I think the 27.2mm seatpost on a gravel bike makes too much sense. I don't mind the larger diameter on my Vamoots RSL, but I wouldn't have complained about a thinner one, either. Did you consider the ENVE gravel bars? I've been really liking the flared drops on their SES bars and how the stem/bar combo really attenuates road vibrations compared to the Easton aero bars I was using before.

    I just acquired my second Moots Compact, and this one is getting S&S couplers for the frequent travel I do these days.
    I did consider the Enve Gravel bars. The shop had some on the shelf, but the corners behind the brake levers are far more severe than the smooth rounded curves on the compact road bars, and since I already had a set of the compact road in my size from a previous bike, I decided to go with them.

    I have a set of the flared Easton EC70AX on my Norco Search XR and really do like the flare. I might have gone that route if I hadn't already had the compact road set.

    I seriously considered couplers on this bike so I would have the option to travel with it, but declined. Mainly because I'm a big heavy guy, and I wasn't sure if the couplers might compromise some of the stifness and integrity of the frame. After I have a season or two on it, I may consider a frameset with couplers, but for now, I don't have a lot of travel in my plans.

  13. #288
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finx View Post
    I did consider the Enve Gravel bars. The shop had some on the shelf, but the corners behind the brake levers are far more severe than the smooth rounded curves on the compact road bars, and since I already had a set of the compact road in my size from a previous bike, I decided to go with them.

    I have a set of the flared Easton EC70AX on my Norco Search XR and really do like the flare. I might have gone that route if I hadn't already had the compact road set.

    I seriously considered couplers on this bike so I would have the option to travel with it, but declined. Mainly because I'm a big heavy guy, and I wasn't sure if the couplers might compromise some of the stifness and integrity of the frame. After I have a season or two on it, I may consider a frameset with couplers, but for now, I don't have a lot of travel in my plans.
    I actually opted for a Compact with it's mostly straight tubing over the SLR's milled tubing for durability reasons. I had a hydroformed aluminum Storck that was badly dented by TSA, so I don't mind a few more grams on a frame if it's a little more travel-ready. I love my SLR for a lot of reasons, but the simplicity of the Compact works very well in this application.

    To be honest, I think S&S couplers would actually add to the stiffness of a frame if properly installed. I don't think they're worth it financially if you don't travel a lot with your bike, as compared to traveling with a standard bike case. I used to do a trip or two a year with mine and a clamshell case, but now that I'm on the road 7-8 months out of the year, having something in a smaller form factor (that the company will pay for) is worth it to me. Right now I'm using a Ritchey BreakAway CX, but I think the Compact will be more versatile for business and personal trips- because I would want to ride it more. The Ritchey might be suitable for more terrain, but it just doesn't make me all giggly.

  14. #289
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    Here is a better picture of the Routt RSL.



    I'm fighting a bit of a cold, so I've only had it out on one easy, very flat 35 mile ride. It was enough to finalize the fit. I'll cut the rest of the steerer this week, move the seat forward about 6mm and lower the shifters a bit on the bars, and put the 120cm stem back on it.

    I love the bike. It's not flashy, but damn it's a nice ride. I can't wait to take it out on a long ride and see how it compares to my carbon endurance bikes for comfort/compliance. Based on my one short ride, I think it's going to blow them away....

  15. #290
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    And finally, this is with the Cane Creek eeWings Titanium crank installed. Rings are Praxis. Also installed the Hope RX4 four piston caliper on the front only.

    Steerer still not cut, and the bars/hoods are rolled up just a tiny bit too much.

    Moots Registry-2019-04-16_08-50-40.jpg
    Last edited by Finx; 4 Days Ago at 07:51 AM. Reason: Fixed image Link

  16. #291
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    Ran into a problem with the 30mm spindle on the new Cane Creek cranks.

    The bike has a BSA bottom bracket shell, which has a 34mm internal width. This leaves only 2mm between the crank spindle and the BB shell.

    Unfortunately, E-Tube wires are 2.5mm thick, which means they are slightly pinched between the shell and the spindle.

    There is enough friction that it's noticeable when pedaling.

    Will be working with the shop to find a resolution.

  17. #292
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    I had a similar problem with an internally-routed Storck, but in its case I had a press-fit bottom bracket. I had to do a lot of grinding on the bottom bracket shell to make it work, and ruined a couple bottom brackets in the process. Even though it's confined to a trainer these days and rarely needs to be rebuilt, I dread working on it. It took me months and a lot of work/parts to resolve the first time.

    I think the diameter of that bottom bracket is the issue, and a standard bottom bracket/crank might add that little bit more clearance in the shell. I replaced mine in the Storck recently with a beefier Wheels Manufacturing version, and it was a challenge to get it to align properly as compared to the SRAM plastic shell. You could see a difference in diameter.

  18. #293
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    I have one bike with internally routed cables and I think they are the devils invention. Ugh. Never ever. What a pain in the ass.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  19. #294
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post
    I had a similar problem with an internally-routed Storck, but in its case I had a press-fit bottom bracket. I had to do a lot of grinding on the bottom bracket shell to make it work, and ruined a couple bottom brackets in the process. Even though it's confined to a trainer these days and rarely needs to be rebuilt, I dread working on it. It took me months and a lot of work/parts to resolve the first time.

    I think the diameter of that bottom bracket is the issue, and a standard bottom bracket/crank might add that little bit more clearance in the shell. I replaced mine in the Storck recently with a beefier Wheels Manufacturing version, and it was a challenge to get it to align properly as compared to the SRAM plastic shell. You could see a difference in diameter.
    Ii came with a 24mm Ultegra 8000 crankset. There were obviously no problems here. I bought the Cane Creek eeWings crank as an upgrade. It cost me a kidney, so I'd surely like to make it work. I was talking with one of the experienced techs at the shop where I bought the bike. He has some ideas to try to make it work. I'll be keenly interested to see what he comes up with.

  20. #295
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    One thing nice about electronic wires over derailleur cables is you have more flexibility in routing. Bends that would be impossible with a derailleur cable are simple with a wire.

    I'm sure there is a way to make his happen without compromising the performance of the system. Much of it depends on the skill of your mechanic.

    If not, there's always eTap. You have another kidney, don't you?

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