2007 Ibis Silk vs. 2007/2008 Specialized Roubaix Expert
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  1. #1

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    2007 Ibis Silk vs. 2007/2008 Specialized Roubaix Expert

    I'm going to purchase my first road bike and was hoping for some guidance. Which of these bikes would you prefer or choose? Both bikes are full Ultegra and the 2007 models are comparable? The 2008 would run a 1000 more to get into. Any preferences on one vs the other? Would appreciate any input?

    Thanks in advance,

    Matt

  2. #2
    Cycling induced anoesis
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    Quote Originally Posted by matthewdhill
    I'm going to purchase my first road bike and was hoping for some guidance. Which of these bikes would you prefer or choose? Both bikes are full Ultegra and the 2007 models are comparable? The 2008 would run a 1000 more to get into. Any preferences on one vs the other? Would appreciate any input?

    Thanks in advance,

    Matt
    These are two very different bikes to be considering. The Ibis is more on a par with the Tarmac and is going to have a noticably stiffer ride and quicker handling, so the type of rider and type of riding you intend on doing matters. Ideally, ride both on similar roads so that you get a feel for the bikes and the fit. Speaking of which, if this is your first road bike you'd do yourself a big favor by getting a real bike fit where measurements are taken, flexibility tested and then time on a fit cycle to dial in your individual fit. This alone may dictate which bike suites you best.
    Last edited by PJ352; 03-10-2008 at 08:28 AM. Reason: addition..

  3. #3
    RoadBikeReview Member
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    heed PJ's advice. You have lots of choices and determing how you will ride and what brand/model bike will fit your body and riding style best is the "quest". Enjoy the journey
    "The problem with losing your mind is that by the time you realize it's gone, it's too late to get it back."
    Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson

  4. #4

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    Talking I'm appreciating your input!

    I've had a chance to spend about an hour riding each of the bikes and enjoyed riding both of them.

    I understand the layering of carbon fiber and geometry of the bike affects its properties. I've been told that the Roubaix has a more upright geometry and on extended rides is a more comfortable bike. I'm 6' 3" and both bikes are 61cm. I can ride a 58 or 59, but was told by a few people that I would be better to error on the side of the larger frame. What are your thoughts on that?

    I would ideally like to ride 3-4 times a week. I would guess the majority of the rides would be between 20-30 miles. I would like to start doing some century rides and have entered a couple of triathlons this year. Do you feel that the difference in bike geometry will have a significant affect.

    On a side note: I've also looked at and Obrea Lobular. Both of the bikes above have carbon fiber frames. The Obrea has an aluminum frame, supposedly with properties that give it a ride similar to a carbon fiber frame. The Obrea isn't any cheaper and has similar components. The rear triangle, front fork and seat post are carbon fiber. Is there any argument for looking more seriously at this bike? I've tried to do a little research on the Obrea, but have found little on the Lobular. Those who ride Obreas seem to like them, but it seems like an expensive aluminum frame. Any thoughts?

    Thanks again in advance,

    Matt

  5. #5
    Cycling induced anoesis
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    Quote Originally Posted by matthewdhill
    I've had a chance to spend about an hour riding each of the bikes and enjoyed riding both of them.

    I understand the layering of carbon fiber and geometry of the bike affects its properties. I've been told that the Roubaix has a more upright geometry and on extended rides is a more comfortable bike. I'm 6' 3" and both bikes are 61cm. I can ride a 58 or 59, but was told by a few people that I would be better to error on the side of the larger frame. What are your thoughts on that?

    I would ideally like to ride 3-4 times a week. I would guess the majority of the rides would be between 20-30 miles. I would like to start doing some century rides and have entered a couple of triathlons this year. Do you feel that the difference in bike geometry will have a significant affect.

    On a side note: I've also looked at and Obrea Lobular. Both of the bikes above have carbon fiber frames. The Obrea has an aluminum frame, supposedly with properties that give it a ride similar to a carbon fiber frame. The Obrea isn't any cheaper and has similar components. The rear triangle, front fork and seat post are carbon fiber. Is there any argument for looking more seriously at this bike? I've tried to do a little research on the Obrea, but have found little on the Lobular. Those who ride Obreas seem to like them, but it seems like an expensive aluminum frame. Any thoughts?

    Thanks again in advance,

    Matt
    If you've ridden both bikes for an hour and enjoyed the rides, that says a lot. They both must have fit relatively well and you aren't having a problem with the more aggressive set up on the Ibis. But I have to say (again) that, IMO you really need to get a true fitting rather than error on the side of the larger frame. What is the basis for the statement if no measurements were taken?

    Regarding the Orbea, if it were me, I wouldn't seriously consider an aluminum frame no matter where they put pieces of carbon. IME, the only place carbon makes a difference on a non carbon frame is the fork. Carbon seat stays and seat post don't smooth the ride any. And what would seal the deal is if the prices weren't that different. Remember, you said you'd be looking to ride centuries - that given, CF or steel is the way to go, IMO.

    Get a fitting, use the measurements from it to set the bikes up, ride both bikes again for an extended period of time, then decide. After you spend the money and are riding pain free, you'll be glad you did.

  6. #6
    TelemarkTumalo
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    Bike Fit is Key

    An exciting time to be considering a new road bike. There are so many great options out there. While I'm a committed Ibis devotee, I agree with the recommendations to make sure that a good fit is made. You will be spending premium dollars on bikes in this range, and you owe it to yourself to be fitted correctly. Most quality shops will have a fit cycle and a trained individual to do your fit. And, it they are worth their salt, they will try to get you on to the best fitting bike available. Most of us will fit on stock frame sizes with a few tweaks of stem length and rise, seat set back or even seat post changes, but some really do have unique fitting needs. Then, a custom bike might be in your best interest. With all of that being said, I can tell you that Ibis is a unique company and has just about the best reputation out there for service and the hutzpa to stand behind their products. Imagine if you have a problem, that the owner of the company calls you directly to discuss it! That is what Scott Nicol and company do. You won't find that with Specialized, Trek, Giant, Orbea, etc. Regardless, Specialized and Trek make great bikes. Some of us just need a bit more soul in our machines. Best of luck to you.

    Mark

    BTW. Leonard Zinn, Brent Steelman and Seven do great custom fits for taller riders
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