Ridley Excalibur Opinions - Page 2
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  1. #26
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    Thanks for the report and pics - which oval set is it (100, 300, 500) and what size frame - stem?

  2. #27
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    Hey nescafe, that was a great write up! Gotta say, you covered all the bases and we share a lot of the same criteria for choosing CF. I, too don't want to break the bank on an unknown commodity, but don't want something so low buck that it's not representative of what a good CF bike can be.

    From what you say, the ride characteristics are what I'm looking for as well. Handling, well.. I think we both know that an individual has to experience that for themselves.

    Being a worrier by nature, I'm a little concerned that the HT/ steerer tube height may not be tall enough for me, resulting in too low of a reach (stack height). I'm not concerned with length of reach, that'll be fine, but I can tell from the pics that you like your bars appreciably lower than I do. Mine are about 4 - 5 cm below top of saddle. Thus, my question about cutting the steerer tube down.

    I've got some thinking to do. I'm considering several other brands of CF as well as a couple fo steels. I'd be happy to hear any other thoughts you have along the way, and thanks again for taking the time to share what you did - I appreciate it!!

  3. #28
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    PJ: no worries. it's tough sometimes reading reviews and all you hear is "it's laterally stiff and vertically compliant"! as to the saddle-stem drop - that's the angle of the pic playing tricks! it really isn't that aggressive...

    toon: it's an oval R700 i think. the basic one. it's a 90mm stem (which my LBS insists is too short, but he said i can use it for a month and if i'm happy i keep it. else, he'll swap in the 100mm)

  4. #29
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    When I'm reading bike mag reviews I take what is said with a grain of salt. It's one opinion and one source of info among many others. At some point we have to get on the bike and put it through the paces ourselves. I'm by no means belittling your comments, because they were very helpful - mostly because you left out the superlatives!

    My turn to try to help you regarding the stem length you mentioned. This is right out of a textbook, so you too can take it with a grain of salt, but if you can ride with your hands on the hoods, arms slightly bent (thus, a 'normal' riding position) and the bars run through the front hub obscuring your vision of it, the stem is the correct size. Like I said, this is textbook stuff and may not work for you, but similar to KOPS, it's a starting point.

    Feel free to add any updates you wish to this thread. I'd love to hear more as you get more miles on the bike. And thanks again for all your input!

  5. #30
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    The stem looks like the 300 or 500 as the 700 has a hint of red in the logo graphic as well as a silver front plate. What size frame is it anyway.

  6. #31
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    Xs (52.5 Tt)

  7. #32
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    I never thought a xs frame would look that good - great design. Have fun ridin

  8. #33
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    I agree. I think in most other brands it would be a 50 - 51cm. In general, I think bikes with longer head tubes look better in smaller sizes.

  9. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by PJ352
    That's a nice looking ride, thanks for sharing. Is it an '08? Also, did your LBS get the frameset in and build it up? If so, (and you may not know this) did the steerer tube have to be cut down?

    I'm very curious to hear more about your riding impressions. Specifically, how much road feedback along with smoothing out the irregulairies. I find many CF bikes either over compensate (and end up feeling somewhat dead) or are overly stiff and beat me up. I'm looking for a bike with a somewhat balanced ride.

    this maybe a little late, but i have both 06' Excalibur & Damocles in XSmall. the Damocles is a very smooth comfortable riding bike but does not excelerate like the Excl(iam not saying that its slow). Its just the feeling is more immediate with the Excalibur because of the solid feel of the BB.No flexing there.Its rock solid. Great for sprinting and closing gaps. Excl is stiff but still is has touch of comfort that it wont beat you up. i weigh 150lbs.

    if you are into speed, like chasing down breakaways, and sprinting, i would get the Excalibur. Its cheaper and lighter. My damocles is for trainning and the Excl. is for Sat. ride.

    weights (g): using laboratory scale

    EXCL. DAMOCLES

    FRAME: 1159.46 g 1325.0g
    FORK: 370.07g 347.0g

    i know i was a little disappointed in the Damocles frame weight, its almost 1/2lb heavier.


    hope this help.

  10. #35
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    No, not too late, so thanks for posting. For a variety of reasons I remain undecided so, mostly out of necessity, I may opt for another steel frameset. The whole CF issue has me baffled, and to compound the problem I can't find many bikes to test ride, given I take a 52 cm in most.

    I've heard it mentioned that the Ridley's are getting a redo in the next couple of months, so maybe that'll be enough to sway me. But thanks again for sharing your thoughts.

  11. #36
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    PJ, I took my Excal out on its maiden voyage tonight. Your advice was helpful, and it is puuuuurfect!!! I see that you are looking at possibly getting one. I used to have a Bianchi 928 and an Orbea Onix, which you may remember. In my first 20 miles, I can give this assesment... The Ridley is a stiffer frame, but not in a bad way. I felt very connected to the road, and the bumps were very well absorbed. My Bianchi felt dead, and my Orbea had some flex to it. I really liked the ride quality of it a lot. When I "put the hammer down" It just seemed to shoot forward, it didn't flex. It wasn't harsh at all. I switched to Vittoria Open Corsa Evo CXs when I built it up so it may be part of the excellent ride quality. If you are interested in the Excal sitll, pm me, I think I have a connection that I could get you a very nice price on a frameset If you don't mind getting a 2007 if they still have your size in stock.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snopro440
    PJ, I took my Excal out on its maiden voyage tonight. Your advice was helpful, and it is puuuuurfect!!! I see that you are looking at possibly getting one. I used to have a Bianchi 928 and an Orbea Onix, which you may remember. In my first 20 miles, I can give this assesment... The Ridley is a stiffer frame, but not in a bad way. I felt very connected to the road, and the bumps were very well absorbed. My Bianchi felt dead, and my Orbea had some flex to it. I really liked the ride quality of it a lot. When I "put the hammer down" It just seemed to shoot forward, it didn't flex. It wasn't harsh at all. I switched to Vittoria Open Corsa Evo CXs when I built it up so it may be part of the excellent ride quality. If you are interested in the Excal sitll, pm me, I think I have a connection that I could get you a very nice price on a frameset If you don't mind getting a 2007 if they still have your size in stock.
    Hi Snopro!
    Yes, I remember the thread you started about bike sizing. I'm glad it all worked out for you and happy I could help. Sometimes I think I'm better able to help others than I am myself. Literally, I've been looking for a bike for two years. But, all that aside, what you wrote about your maiden voyage was helpful for me to read.

    I also picked up the new Bicycling mag (buyers guide issue) and all that did was serve to confuse me more. They did a little write up on the Excalibur and it was positive, but they said nothing about ride quality. You may be right in what you say about switching to Open Corsa's though, because my experience is that changing tires changes ride quality more than any other factor, all else being equal.

    Before I wrote you back, I checked out your bike again - really nice set up!! And I'm glad you're enjoying your ride. I have to get my butt in gear and make a decision soon or I'll be resorting to rubber bands, paper clips and glue to keep my rusty steed on the road!

  13. #38
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    Thanks for the nice comments.. It was 25 degrees and the roads were salty with patches of ice so I really couldn't ride aggressively, so I am excited for summer! dang Minnesota winters (1st time in my life I have said that - seriously!!) . I have ridden a lot of bikes (lately including the Bianchi 928 SL and the tcube, the Orbea Orca, Opal, Specialized Tarmac and a couple others I can't think of) and I am sure I made the right choice, and am happy to be back on Campagnolo as well. I am very satisfied, that is for sure!

  14. #39
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    25 degrees sounds warm to me right now. I just checked our weather and we've got a wind chill of 10 here in upstate NY. I call myself a displaced warm weather person, so I'm always complaining about winter.

    Anyway, I'm glad you're enjoying your new bike. Keep us updated on your ride impressions!

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snopro440
    Thanks for the nice comments.. It was 25 degrees and the roads were salty with patches of ice so I really couldn't ride aggressively, so I am excited for summer! dang Minnesota winters (1st time in my life I have said that - seriously!!) . I have ridden a lot of bikes (lately including the Bianchi 928 SL and the tcube, the Orbea Orca, Opal, Specialized Tarmac and a couple others I can't think of) and I am sure I made the right choice, and am happy to be back on Campagnolo as well. I am very satisfied, that is for sure!
    Where in Minnesota? I'm in Edina ... I'm hoping my excalibur will get it's first ride on the road in the next couple weeks. Currently, it's on the trainer with some odds and ends parts. When my new bars arrive I'll finish the build and hopefully get it on the road.

  16. #41
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    Just the other end of the Twin Cities, Champlin. You will really like the Excalibur.. A LOT!! No that I got a taste of it, it is supposed to snow now! Figures!!!! Oh well..

  17. #42
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    My first post on the road forum - A heavy rider (230lb), although very fit due to mountain biking, looking for a nice carbon road ride to do some club runs and the odd race.
    I have been looking at the offerings from Ridley for some time. Now, do I opt for the excalibur or the orion? I am in the region of 6ft 4 tall with a 34inch inseem and regually put in about 100 miles on my 36lb Nicolai FR per week. Can anybody point me in the right direction with these two models, or perhaps another model which would be better suited perhaps.
    Also, can anybody help on the sizing on this frame. With my dimensions mentioned above, would it be a large or an extra large. I did ride a Specialized allez last year during the winter, but found it a little small. Any help anybody may be able to contribute, would be much appriciated.

  18. #43
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    I am 6'01" tall and I have a medium. It has a 110 mm stem, and a 25mm setback seatpost. I would think that a large would be the way to go. I haven't ridden an Orion, but the Excal is a very good riding frame. Compare your specs with a bike you like the fit of before you buy. I hadn't even seen a Ridley, much less ridden one before I bought mine and because I did my homework, I made a good choice. Even if you don't have a road bike currently, take a few test rides at local shops to decide what fits you the best, take those specs, and then compare to the Ridley. Good luck!!

  19. #44
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    Many thanks snopro440, sound advice.

  20. #45
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    Ridley sizing for big guys

    Quote Originally Posted by Lornibear
    My first post on the road forum - A heavy rider (230lb), although very fit due to mountain biking, looking for a nice carbon road ride to do some club runs and the odd race.
    I have been looking at the offerings from Ridley for some time. Now, do I opt for the excalibur or the orion? I am in the region of 6ft 4 tall with a 34inch inseem and regually put in about 100 miles on my 36lb Nicolai FR per week. Can anybody point me in the right direction with these two models, or perhaps another model which would be better suited perhaps.
    Also, can anybody help on the sizing on this frame. With my dimensions mentioned above, would it be a large or an extra large. I did ride a Specialized allez last year during the winter, but found it a little small. Any help anybody may be able to contribute, would be much appriciated.
    I am 6' 4" with a 36" inseam, long arms and an average torso and I ride a large Helium, which is very similar to an Excal and has the same sizing. I run a 13cm stem and have the saddle back quite a bit but it works fine. I could also probably fit fine on an XL with no setback and an 11 or 12cm stem. I wanted the Helium to be little quicker handling and different than my other bike, which is sized about like a Ridley XL and has pretty relaxed geometry.

  21. #46
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    Size Large seems the way to go as for which model to pick - a lot depends on where and how you like to ride it. Excalibur and Helium are both great for climbing but obviously lack that ultimate str8 line speed of Noah and Damo. Given your size I say go for Damo if you can afford it but as its your first road bike and if there is a budget then you won't be disappointed with an Orion.
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonraid
    Size Large seems the way to go as for which model to pick - a lot depends on where and how you like to ride it. Excalibur and Helium are both great for climbing but obviously lack that ultimate str8 line speed of Noah and Damo. Given your size I say go for Damo if you can afford it but as its your first road bike and if there is a budget then you won't be disappointed with an Orion.

    PLEASE STOP YOUR BS!!!! How in the hell do you figure that the Noah and Damocles lack straight line speed? Is it because you read things about them, as usual?
    I've had a Excalibur, a Damocles and now I'm on a Helium. It's easily the stiffest of the three, it handles better than the Damocles because the fork is waaay stiffer and it's lighter.
    I simply cannot sit here and read the crap you spew about Ridley bikes.
    Do you have one?
    Have you ridden one?
    Have you even seen one up close?

    None of the high end Ridley frames are designated. There are no 'climbing' bikes, nor are there 'sprinting' bikes. Sure, the Noah is a beast of the 4 framesets and rides like crap (yes, it does...I rode it last weekend for 120 miles...brutal!), but the other three do everything well.

    I weigh 180 and am a big diesel/sprinter. I have NEVER felt anything that remotely resembled frame flex on my Helium. In our practice crit last week, I lead out our sprinter at 38mph and 1540 watts. My Helium didn't fly apart. And that's plenty of straight line speed... And he's riding a Scott Addict (he's 6'4" and 210)...! You likely think that's a 'climbing' bike as well...

    I know you think you know a lot about the frames, but you just don't. I was pushed towards the Helium by the guys at Sinclair (the importers of Ridley) because they said it would be a better, more comfortable frameset, but still do EVERYTHING I needed it to do...and it has done just that...

    I know you'll answer back with more BS...it's to be expected of floor guys in a shop that have little practical experience with high end product. Actually, it qualifies you to work at the 'pro' shop here in town.

    Stop your line of rhetoric until you've had your ass on any, or all, of the bikes for an extended period of time.

  23. #48
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    Sorry for my late reply - been on road with some racing buddies all over and therefore not much spare time - anyway season is slowly drawing to a close and here I am.

    The answer to your questions - I have a couple of Looks and Colnago's.
    as well as a Ridley bike or 2, (Excalibur and a Damocles) and also ridden Aedons, Orions and a few others and a friend of mine has just bought a Noah which i am hoping to ride in the next few week - in actual fact he did a test vs a friend who was on an AXM (merckx) and on the same road and speed they could do same speed with 10 - 15 HR less in a sustained effort on the Noah.

    Coming from my older Look and Colnago onto the Excalibur my first impression was that it lacked the str8 line speed but was great for out of the saddle climbs, on the other hand on the Damo it seemed less of an effort to maintain speed and yes I am very much aware of wheelset/tyre choice etc. I never mentioned anything about Helium being less stiff in actual fact the DNA is pretty much the same on both as they use the same carbon - there is just more of it in the Noah and I am sure you will feel the difference at the top end if you get a chance to ride one - the difference will be further amplified with use as you load the frame (ever ridden a Cat 1's bike at the end of the season after he has put in 30 000 miles when it starts to soften up!)

    As for Ridley not designating their bikes - well no one does because they don't want to enclose their market by type-casting, its up to the individual to decide which frame is best suited to their requirements. The question you need to ask is why Ridley have made 2 framesets at same price point whilst one is atleast 200g lighter?
    A writer cannot serve today those who make history, he must serve those who are subject to it - history's victims ..... Albert Camus

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by toonraid
    Sorry for my late reply - been on road with some racing buddies all over and therefore not much spare time - anyway season is slowly drawing to a close and here I am.

    The answer to your questions - I have a couple of Looks and Colnago's.
    as well as a Ridley bike or 2, (Excalibur and a Damocles) and also ridden Aedons, Orions and a few others and a friend of mine has just bought a Noah which i am hoping to ride in the next few week - in actual fact he did a test vs a friend who was on an AXM (merckx) and on the same road and speed they could do same speed with 10 - 15 HR less in a sustained effort on the Noah.

    Coming from my older Look and Colnago onto the Excalibur my first impression was that it lacked the str8 line speed but was great for out of the saddle climbs, on the other hand on the Damo it seemed less of an effort to maintain speed and yes I am very much aware of wheelset/tyre choice etc. I never mentioned anything about Helium being less stiff in actual fact the DNA is pretty much the same on both as they use the same carbon - there is just more of it in the Noah and I am sure you will feel the difference at the top end if you get a chance to ride one - the difference will be further amplified with use as you load the frame (ever ridden a Cat 1's bike at the end of the season after he has put in 30 000 miles when it starts to soften up!)

    As for Ridley not designating their bikes - well no one does because they don't want to enclose their market by type-casting, its up to the individual to decide which frame is best suited to their requirements. The question you need to ask is why Ridley have made 2 framesets at same price point whilst one is atleast 200g lighter?
    Good God, you know nothing...
    I'll waste no more time on this folly.

  25. #50
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