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Thread: 2011 pinarello

  1. #26
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    FPQ and Paris have the same asymmetrics as the Dogma. The Prince and FP3 started the trend w/ Asymmetric chainstays. We used FP3's in our rental fleet and now have the FPQ's. There is definitely a subtle difference between the 2. I noticed better accleration thru the pedal stroke.

    Here is the explanation from Pinarello about asymmetric frame design.

    http://www.gitabike.com/media/pi_dogma_2010.pdf

    The Idea
    The behavior of a bicycle frame is strongly asymmetric. While the forces applied to the pedals are approximately equal, the offset of the chain to the right side means that the forces acting on the frame are asymmetric.

    The asymmetry of the Dogma 60.1 begins with the chainstays, but progresses through the
    remainder of the frame as well as the fork. The right chainstay is smaller at the front end (near the bottom bracket) and grows larger towards the rear (dropout). Conversely, the left chainstay is reinforced on its front end, which is a very high-stress area, and grows thinner toward the rear. The right seatstay is larger and stronger than the left to counteract the forces acting on the bottom bracket area. The lower left of the top tube is reinforced as well and the right fork blade is noticeably larger and more angular in shape than the left. These are the regions that were determined to undergo the most stress from the asymmetrical pedaling forces and have therefore been strengthened, while other areas have been lightened. This creates a bicycle that is more “balanced” than possible with conventional techniques.
    Bart Stetler
    QueenCity Bicycles
    1408-A East Blvd
    Charlotte NC 28203
    704-522-7006
    www.queencitybicycles.com

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by southparkcycles
    FPQ and Paris have the same asymmetrics as the Dogma. The Prince and FP3 started the trend w/ Asymmetric chainstays. We used FP3's in our rental fleet and now have the FPQ's. There is definitely a subtle difference between the 2. I noticed better accleration thru the pedal stroke.

    Here is the explanation from Pinarello about asymmetric frame design.

    http://www.gitabike.com/media/pi_dogma_2010.pdf

    The Idea
    The behavior of a bicycle frame is strongly asymmetric. While the forces applied to the pedals are approximately equal, the offset of the chain to the right side means that the forces acting on the frame are asymmetric.

    The asymmetry of the Dogma 60.1 begins with the chainstays, but progresses through the
    remainder of the frame as well as the fork. The right chainstay is smaller at the front end (near the bottom bracket) and grows larger towards the rear (dropout). Conversely, the left chainstay is reinforced on its front end, which is a very high-stress area, and grows thinner toward the rear. The right seatstay is larger and stronger than the left to counteract the forces acting on the bottom bracket area. The lower left of the top tube is reinforced as well and the right fork blade is noticeably larger and more angular in shape than the left. These are the regions that were determined to undergo the most stress from the asymmetrical pedaling forces and have therefore been strengthened, while other areas have been lightened. This creates a bicycle that is more “balanced” than possible with conventional techniques.
    I'm a Prince owner, and likely soon to be a Dogma owner, and that's a one of the biggest loads of marketing BS I've ever heard. More "balanced"? What is that even supposed to mean?

    The Dogma looks awesome. That's 99.9% of the reason people buy it. The asymmetric crap is just a marketing. It's like saying the paint on the Mona Lisa is mixed with holy water. Who cares. It just looks great.

  3. #28
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    The asymmetric crap is just a marketing.
    I would have to disagree with that. There is no doubt more force on the bike on the drive train side and asymmetry has been used in mtb frames for quite some time, especially dual suspensions (take a look almost any rear triangle or even better a bike from Pivot). I am surprised it has taken the technology so long to make it to road bikes.
    Bart Stetler
    QueenCity Bicycles
    1408-A East Blvd
    Charlotte NC 28203
    704-522-7006
    www.queencitybicycles.com

  4. #29
    Is it the future yet?
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    I'm with DiegoM on this one.
    Maybe on paper and all, but on the road, I doubt it.

  5. #30
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    i have a question, i'm currently riding an FP7 in a 50 and if i move up to a dogma that has that proprietary seatpost and layback saddle design, that would pose a problem for me as I'm just right with my current reach with the stem and bar combo that came with the bike.

    So would i have to go down another size to accommodate for the layback seatpost since now i may have a reach problem? Or suck it up and get a shorter stem? which would not be my first choice
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  6. #31
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    Looks like the seat tube angle is steeper (74) on the Dogma in a 50 than the FP7 (73.4), which would make your seat further back on the Dogma to be in the same position relative to the BB, if that is what you are going for. This may make the setback seatpost be OK, but it will extend your reach. Since it looks like the top tube is the same on both 50s, it will require a shorter stem to get the same reach. Don't know the exact amounts, but your thinking seems to be correct.

    I had a similar issue going from a Paris to a Prince, but the top tube was shorter on the same size Prince, so the shorter top tube canceled out pushing the seat back. Still ended up pulling the stem back a cm.

    Good Luck

  7. #32
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    where did you get the 73.4 from? i pulled up the 2010 archeive geo from gita and it lists the same geo as the dogma. Looked at the 2011 geo and it's 74 for the 50

    Am i looking at the right thing?

    http://www.gitabike.com/cgi-bin/shop...aRM&0_option=1

    http://www.pinarello.com/else/technical_data.pdf
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  8. #33
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    I stand corrected

    Sorry - I also went to the Gita archives, but obviously was looking at the wrong numbers - when I looked again, the geometry chart is the same for the FP7, Dogma, Prince and FP3.

    That said, if the geo is the same, are you concerned about the setback seatpost because you are on a zero offset now and do not think you have enough saddle rail room to get the same saddle setback with the setback post?

  9. #34
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    yes, exactly. I looked at the sloping 46.5 and the TT length is shorter 515mm vs 525 on the 50. that way i avoid having to go w/ a shorter stem...really need to sit on a 46.5 though
    Last edited by foofighter; 03-03-2011 at 09:08 PM.
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