Pinarello F4:13 Disaster - Page 2
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 91
  1. #26

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by dnalsaam
    All you need is some soft wet ground like that seen in the photo of the rider and the front wheel can decelerate from perhaps 40 mph to 0 mph in a matter of a second.
    10 mph to 0 mph!

  2. #27

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by Sriajuda
    As we can see in the picture, the front wheel and the fork both remain intact. It is quite absurd to have a frame that yields before these two inherently weaker components. Either the frame had some damage prior to the incident, or it was designed or built inadequately. Simple as that..
    3 cases have already been reported!

  3. #28
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    202
    Ok, If ive read this right,

    You were riding a road bike offroad at the time of the crash (a racing frame at that)

    You put further force on the frame by heavy breaking on the front wheel?

    And then you want a warranty on the frame you have clearly misused?

    Ok think of it this way - youve just bought a ferrari, you have taken it down a dirt road and for some reason have swerved and ended up in the verge, rock and tree have mechanically destroyed the bottom of the car, would you then go to ferrari and ask for a new car because it was too low, when the car is clearly designed for road use only?

    If you ask me you have been very irrational and have blackened the name of a reputable company who have made some of the greatest frames currently on the market


    Thats my two cents anyway
    Beloved Cervelo SLC is gone :(

  4. #29
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    48
    So, I have a F4:13 as well. This case concerns me a little bit; however I donīt understand this accident clearly.

    However, two points:

    1.The bike business and technology is overpriced and overestimated. In secret the developers admit, that the frames brake all the time and they are produced much simplier than we could imagine in China or Taiwan.

    2. Unfortunately, the frame triangle of the F4:13 was the first step of Pinarello into the carbon business and nothing special. The triangle was produced in Taiwan, the rear cage and the fork elsewhere. Its heavy and the mold was not exclusively used for Pinarello; there were some models from other brands on the market; although they were not very common or widespread.

    However, I like the brand Pinarello and my bike very much as ist is stiff and goog on downhills but less forgiving or light.

    The Paris and the Prince use unique molds.

    Finally, I would recommend a Colnago from the point of the production process.

  5. #30

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by Getoutandride
    Ok, If ive read this right,

    You were riding a road bike offroad at the time of the crash (a racing frame at that)

    You put further force on the frame by heavy breaking on the front wheel?

    And then you want a warranty on the frame you have clearly misused?

    Ok think of it this way - youve just bought a ferrari, you have taken it down a dirt road and for some reason have swerved and ended up in the verge, rock and tree have mechanically destroyed the bottom of the car, would you then go to ferrari and ask for a new car because it was too low, when the car is clearly designed for road use only?

    If you ask me you have been very irrational and have blackened the name of a reputable company who have made some of the greatest frames currently on the market


    Thats my two cents anyway
    1) the whell and fork support a force that a frame did't support!

    2) I don't want warranty, i'm asking for help to understand what's happened.

    3) i didn't bit, i stop out of the road at a clean grass, no rocks, no trees, and the frame broke! like i explain...

    4) I agree, but if they are so "great" why they have a poor custemer service? The great companies try to develop better products (SPECIALIZED, TREK, MERIDA...great costumer service) and i think they can analyse tha case and tell me what happen!
    Last edited by arech; 01-11-2009 at 05:48 PM.

  6. #31

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by steiger1
    However, I like the brand Pinarello and my bike very much as ist is stiff and goog on downhills but less forgiving or light.
    Finally, I would recommend a Colnago from the point of the production process.
    I like PINARELLO too, and i like they can develop better and better bikes. I have a Galilleo to train and the F4:13 i just use for racing (no more). Now i'm riding a Colgano Criastallo..lighter and sttifer and made in Italy, with a ISO 9000 control quality...

    To understand (interpret) the statement:
    1) i was racing
    2) I avoided running into a crash ahead of you
    3) I locked the front wheel (brake)
    4) started to go over the handlebars
    5) the frame broke
    6) I crashed to the ground, frame already broken.

  7. #32
    collector of glass shards
    Reputation: Sriajuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by arech
    2) I don't want warranty, i'm asking for help to understand what's happened.
    How many kilometres are on that frame? Do ride a lot in the hills & mountains? What is your weight?

  8. #33

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by Sriajuda
    How many kilometres are on that frame? Do ride a lot in the hills & mountains? What is your weight?
    15000 Km. 50% hills, 6% avg, 71 Kg (156 lbs).

  9. #34

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by Getoutandride
    Ok think of it this way - youve just bought a ferrari...
    COLNAGO/FERRARI....PINARELLO/?...FIAT....

  10. #35
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    689
    Quote Originally Posted by arech
    COLNAGO/FERRARI....PINARELLO/?...FIAT....
    No, Ferrari.......FIAT

    Colnago, Pinarello.....Chery

  11. #36

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by dave2pvd
    No, Ferrari.......FIAT

    Colnago, Pinarello.....Chery
    Chery?! NO!!!! Beijin Auto
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by arech; 01-12-2009 at 02:26 PM.

  12. #37
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    223
    Pinarello = Porsche

  13. #38
    collector of glass shards
    Reputation: Sriajuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by arech
    15000 Km. 50% hills, 6% avg, 71 Kg (156 lbs).
    Well, consider this: Every time you put pressure on the Pedal, the frame has to flex (bend) in the opposite direction. After half a crank rotation, direction of flexing reverses. Estimating an average of 5 meters per crank revolution, your frame has gone through 3 million flexing cycles.

    The position at which your frame broke is the part of the frame with the most flex / twist due to pedaling. Ergo: Fatigue break. Simply don't trust carbon. It sure is a good material for the pros, but how long do they ride their bikes? Especially in races? More than a 1000 kms? Probably not. All composite materials have less-than-optimal fatigue characteristics, and progressing fatigue is almost undetectable in composites.

    Of course the bike makers could simply design and build on the safer side, with more material in the frame, but then the weight would easily come up to that of a good aluminium frame.

  14. #39

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by T-Dog
    Pinarello = Porsche
    POSH you mean! But for those who like to dream....Colnago/Ferrari it's real!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by arech; 01-15-2009 at 05:07 AM.

  15. #40
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by Sriajuda
    Well, consider this: Every time you put pressure on the Pedal, the frame has to flex (bend) in the opposite direction. After half a crank rotation, direction of flexing reverses. Estimating an average of 5 meters per crank revolution, your frame has gone through 3 million flexing cycles.

    The position at which your frame broke is the part of the frame with the most flex / twist due to pedaling. Ergo: Fatigue break. Simply don't trust carbon. It sure is a good material for the pros, but how long do they ride their bikes? Especially in races? More than a 1000 kms? Probably not. All composite materials have less-than-optimal fatigue characteristics, and progressing fatigue is almost undetectable in composites.

    Of course the bike makers could simply design and build on the safer side, with more material in the frame, but then the weight would easily come up to that of a good aluminium frame.
    Actually its a good opinion, but it does not explain the fact, that pretty new Prince frames have broken.

  16. #41
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: schimanski's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by Getoutandride
    Ok, If ive read this right,

    You were riding a road bike offroad at the time of the crash (a racing frame at that)

    You put further force on the frame by heavy breaking on the front wheel?
    This is my beef here. Imagine someone riding a RACE FRAME (that by definition should be able to be raced not just cruised around) on their lawn and pulling the front brake hard at 10mph. You and lots of others seem to be more than willing to accept that this WILL destroy the frame since its a lawn, not a road. To me this is total bull. Think of Lance cyclocrossing in TdF 2003, crappy frames get destroyed in something like that, good ones don't.

    A race frame has to be able to withstand racing where there's hard braking, even bunny hops over a pothole etc. If hard braking or bunny hopping is not allowed on a certain frame just let's not equip it with any mounts to brakes and state it's not made to withstand anything but light cruising, huh? Simple really.

  17. #42
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    223
    arech your a liar! It broke becuase you crashed it. End of story!

  18. #43
    collector of glass shards
    Reputation: Sriajuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by schimanski
    This is my beef here. Imagine someone riding a RACE FRAME (that by definition should be able to be raced not just cruised around) on their lawn and pulling the front brake hard at 10mph. You and lots of others seem to be more than willing to accept that this WILL destroy the frame since its a lawn, not a road. To me this is total bull. Think of Lance cyclocrossing in TdF 2003, crappy frames get destroyed in something like that, good ones don't.

    A race frame has to be able to withstand racing where there's hard braking, even bunny hops over a pothole etc. If hard braking or bunny hopping is not allowed on a certain frame just let's not equip it with any mounts to brakes and state it's not made to withstand anything but light cruising, huh? Simple really.
    Exactly. I get the impression that some of those who state crap like 'hard braking on soft ground will break a frame' simply are afraid to consider that their own, super-light weight carbon bike might be unsafe.

    Unfortunately, there is no way to verify the safety of such a frame that is nondestructive.

  19. #44
    collector of glass shards
    Reputation: Sriajuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by T-Dog
    arech your a liar! It broke becuase you crashed it. End of story!
    You have been there and witnessed the OP crashing and breaking his bike, yes? If not, better shut up.

  20. #45
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    615
    Quote Originally Posted by Sriajuda
    You have been there and witnessed the OP crashing and breaking his bike, yes? If not, better shut up.
    Lets all chill abit. The op sounds like a geniune chap. It is possible the frame broke upon riding on the grass, but it could also have broken anywhere. Carbon can have structual weakness's, breakages DO happen. The guys on the Parlee stand at UK cycle show told me carbon can have weakness's and break (Parlees are pretty good frames aren't they?) Nothings perfect, if theres a weakness in the frame (may have happened in a previous crash I don't know) and then forces are applied to it, it can break. Look at George Hincappie in the Paris Roubaix; his all carbon fork broke...

  21. #46

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by schimanski
    Think of Lance cyclocrossing in TdF 2003, crappy frames get destroyed in something like that, good ones don't.
    A race frame has to be able to withstand racing where there's hard braking, even bunny hops over a pothole etc. If hard braking or bunny hopping is not allowed on a certain frame just let's not equip it with any mounts to brakes and state it's not made to withstand anything but light cruising, huh? Simple really.
    EXACTLY! i watched a lot of times the Lance's video, and watched a lot of other TDF videos when the guys leave the road and crash. It's common. I don't want to compare my crash but i have never seen a frame broke!

    But the pro's use the same frames which are sold in stores? i think no....

  22. #47

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by T-Dog
    arech your a liar! It broke becuase you crashed it. End of story!
    This can kill somebody. I have had worst crashes, i'm racing to 25 years and i have never seen a frame broke like this. I am not dawdle lie or inventing stories. I am very concerned about this...

  23. #48

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    89
    [QUOTE=MERAKMAN. The op sounds like a geniune chap... carbon can have weakness's and break, nothings perfect, if theres a weakness in the frame it can break. Look at George Hincappie in the Paris Roubaix; his all carbon fork broke...[/QUOTE]

    Not so much as seems...i agree but, PINARELLO can be better...A lot of people were saw when the crash happened, they don't have believed because it was a spill light...About Hincappie the aluninum fork crown broke, not the frame...

  24. #49

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    158
    It seems to me as if the "sticker", was within the laminate, thus the possible

    creation of an unbonded area leading to failure.


    Regards,
    J T

  25. #50
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    Quote Originally Posted by arech
    EXACTLY! i watched a lot of times the Lance's video, and watched a lot of other TDF videos when the guys leave the road and crash. It's common. I don't want to compare my crash but i have never seen a frame broke!
    Come on now, frames and carbon stems break all the time.
    There is no way that I could do an endo over the handlebars, off road on my road bike and expect the frame to be okay. And I'm talking about aluminum, titanium, carbon. Every crash even at slow speed could be the end of your frame. Heck, if you let a broom stick fall on your frame, it will dent or damage it and could be the end.

    Watch this video and see the carbon bike torn in 2 !

    With people like Peter P. around, I am done posting on this website. Mean people have driven me off after 9 plus years. Good luck newbies beware.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.