Farewell to the Gipper!
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 39
  1. #1
    banned
    Reputation: Live Steam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    14,685

    Farewell to the Gipper!

    He was one of the greatest. His proud legacy will remain!

  2. #2
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    193
    The man who brought down the Berlin wall and Communism. Rest in Peace, Gipper.

  3. #3

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Posts
    3,567

    it's sad; he was great

    Quote Originally Posted by Live Steam
    He was one of the greatest. His proud legacy will remain!
    I know there are plenty who disagree, but without a doubt I think the greatest president in my lifetime. He was a gentleman, a moral paradigm, and an inspiration leading the country out of 15 years of malaise.

  4. #4
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Dctrofspin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    950

    See you on the other side, Dutch

    Quote Originally Posted by Live Steam
    He was one of the greatest. His proud legacy will remain!
    A great American that we all owe much. God Bless him in his eternal home.

  5. #5
    Misfit Toy
    Reputation: snapdragen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    23,426
    Opposite ends of the political spectrum for me but , having lost a grandmother to alzheimers, I wouldn't wish it on anyone. He's now free of this horrid disease, blessings on his family.

  6. #6

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    732
    I never cared for the guy, and won't miss him. He had plenty of symbolic significance to "ending" communism, but it was really economic reality that did that (things in USSR were going to crap before Reagan ever got involved). I was only a child when he was president, but I very vividly remember the nuclear arms race and how it scared me to death as a kid, and of course the crazy idea of Star Wars. I was convinced Reagan would bring us all to nuclear destruction, and I'll never forget the long hours watching Iran Contra hearings. Nonetheless, I know lots of people liked him.

    Alzheimer's is a terrible disease, and well, it is likely a blessing he died as I doubt there was anything left of his mind by the end. It sure is a testament to the good care he received as most with Alzheimer's don't fare as well as he did in terms of longevity.

  7. #7
    AJS
    AJS is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,915
    And let's not forget the "October Surprise" & the deal with Iran and the hostages. C'ya, Mr. Raygun. I for one won't shed any tears over his passing.

  8. #8

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    732
    Quote Originally Posted by AJS
    And let's not forget the "October Surprise" & the deal with Iran and the hostages. C'ya, Mr. Raygun. I for one won't shed any tears over his passing.
    and of course Reagonomics, "trickle down economic theory" - the huge growth in military spending and the start of huge growth in government beaurocracy. He was mostly well liked and symbolic - he never accomplished great things as a president, and so I doubt he will be remembered as one of the great ones.

  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    180
    Quote Originally Posted by AJS
    And let's not forget the "October Surprise" & the deal with Iran and the hostages. C'ya, Mr. Raygun. I for one won't shed any tears over his passing.
    Does any president during your life time have a smidget of your respect?

    Give me a name.

    I bet I can find some dirt on him. Does one president's dirty laundry stink less than the other's?

    I tip my hat to all that have served the office, from Kennedy to Reagan to Clinton to Bush. Its a tough job... probably THE toughest.

  10. #10

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    732
    Quote Originally Posted by kilofox
    Does any president during your life time have a smidget of your respect?

    Give me a name.

    I bet I can find some dirt on him. Does one president's dirty laundry stink less than the other's?

    I tip my hat to all that have served the office, from Kennedy to Reagan to Clinton to Bush. Its a tough job... probably THE toughest.
    Based on what people have been saying about, I would say the answer to your question is yes. As for me, no. There have not been any presidents in my short lifetime (6 different presidents) that I have respected - though the really early ones I could not say much about. Who cares if it's a tough job? It has nothing to do with whether I respect them or not. They wanted the job. I was only making a comment on what someone else said previously about Reagan being one of the greatest - as though he could actually compare to Lincoln for example. ;)

  11. #11
    Opus was just napping
    Reputation: thatsmybush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    20,967
    I will remember him for his ability to talk to each individual as if he were in the living room with them. I'll remember his wit and savvy as a politician. I will remember him as a man who made us feel as if he knew that we had sunk somehow in some unknown way and come not in some enormous ground swell way, but in a way your father may give you a bit of advice just on the topic that was bothering you that somehow made you feel better about yourself.

    I will remember his fairwell address as I came of age at 18 years old and felt as if he really believed that America was the country he thought it was, he did not see the rough edges or the wrinkles on the face of the country. For him the country was like the old man who looks at his wife of 50 years and sees her as the way she looked on there wedding day. It is this optimism that I will remember. He let us feel it to and it gave us just a bit of our innocence back that my father's generation had stripped from them through the Vietnam, Watergate years.

    Did he have failures that I will remember. Sure, but they are for another day. Another debate about policy. Today is for reflection about the man. Possibly the last president that didn't have to fake his personna. (If he did I don't want to know). He seemed to be the idealist, the optimist and the Father figure that America was searching for.

    RIP Gipper..."(He) Slipped the Surly Bonds of Earth to Touch the Face of God"
    Last edited by thatsmybush; 06-05-2004 at 08:05 PM.
    In the time of battle you don't rise to the occasion you resort to the level of your conditioning...

  12. #12
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Fredrico's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    27,264

    May the Gipper RIP

    When I was a young kid, Reagan was an aging matinee idol who made westerns. As I grew up, he became the 20 Mule Team Borax spokesman on TV, already playing on his cowboy roles from movie days.

    Cocky, full of ourselves, we laughed when Reagan ran for governer of California, like a cowboy sheriff comin' into town to straighten the place up, hell, to save California from hippie anarchy: pot parties, inventing rock and roll, tripping out on LSD, and demonstrating against the Vietnam War. The good Republicans of California loved Ronald, the Hollywood actor like they love Arnold today. "He's one of us," they'd say, recalling the era of "It's a Wonderful Life" of the 30s, that Reagan was a product of.

    Ronald's gift was being "the Great Communicator." After all, he was a trained Hollywood actor and good at speeches. As a statesman, he had about the same status as our beloved Dubya. What did a Hollywood actor know about international laws and protocols? Nonetheless, he and Gorbachev couldn't have been better cast as the ones to end the Cold War. It may be Reagan's threatening to build a Star Wars shield over the earth that would zap Soviet missles, was seen by the Soviets as so crazy, they decided the game was long past worth playing. Communist world domination was long lost anyway. That threat really died after the Korean War in the Fifties. All skirmishes after that, Cuba, Chile, The Congo, Vietnam, were all legitimate national revolutions. After the Cuban Missle crisis in 1962, the Soviet economy was on the skids, it's military weak, and will for world revolution broken. But that's why they called it the "cold" war. It was a long stand-off that lasted so long as to become ridiculous. Reagan was the perfect leader to pop the bubble and disarm with Gorbachev. And he did it with grace and dignity of the finest statesman, better than a Hollywood actor.

    Even if you disliked his politics, his stuffiness, his conservatism, you had to like the guy. His folksy attitude in front of the mike, his humor, humility, shyness, made us feel that's all he wanted, for people to like him, and we did.

  13. #13
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,349
    Quote Originally Posted by Live Steam
    He was one of the greatest. His proud legacy will remain!
    While I think it is largely true that the Soviet Union would have collapsed anyway because communism is economically unsustainable, Reagan drove the nail in the coffin with great eloquence and changed the world.

  14. #14
    AJS
    AJS is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,915
    Does any president during your life time have a smidget of your respect?
    In my lifetime? Well let's see, that would be from 1961 onward, so the first one would be the obvious - Kennedy for the Civil Rights Act, which Johnson signed into law after his death only somewhat reluctantly, and something that was much more important than Reagan getting the "credit" for the U.S. outlasting the USSR in the Cold War, for example.

    Kennedy also for having the balls to stand up to Kruschev (sic?) in the Cuban Missile Crisis, in the face of Mutually Assured Destruction. Something you don't hear the tough-guy, "war hawk" Republican's ever daring to give a Democratic president credit for.

    Another ex-president that I highly respect is Carter. You may laugh at that choice, but not only does his true compassion for the human race stand in sharp contrast to the feigned "Compassionate Conservatism" of GWB, but Carter has proven it on a daily basis all during his later years since leaving the White House, with his Habitat For Humanity participation, overseeing free and fair elections in other countries, etc. Carter has been more than generous with his time and effort.

    By comparison, what do you see Bush1 doing with his life after the Presidency? Working for the military-industrial complex, (Carlyle Group) to foist yet more war on the world, and to bilk the American taxpayer out of their hard-earned dollars.
    Last edited by AJS; 06-06-2004 at 03:34 AM.

  15. #15
    OES
    OES is offline
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    14,484

    GOOD post, TMBush

    [QUOTE=thatsmybush Did he have failures that I will remember? Sure, but they are for another day. Another debate about policy. Today is for reflection about the man.[/QUOTE]

    How could you not like the guy? One of a kind. He'll be remembered for his great success (credit shared with Gorbachev and the Pope, a confluence of visionaries at a moment in history) in bringing the Cold War to an end. He'll be remembered for grace, a common touch, and for embodying that great optimistic streak in the American character at a time we needed it.

    I miss him because, conservative as he was, he never demonized the opposition, never questioned their integrity, patriotism or heart, and knew how to sit down and deal when the time came. Most people don't realize what a great compromiser he was. We miss that in politics these days.

    I dropped a tear or two when I heard he'd passed.

  16. #16
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,349
    [QUOTE
    ...conservative as he was, he never demonized the opposition, never questioned their integrity, patriotism or heart, and knew how to sit down and deal when the time came.[/QUOTE]

    Yes, this is perhaps the greatest tragedy that the Mayberry Machiavellians that got Bush into the White House have hoisted on America. It would be nice to return to the politics of old.

  17. #17
    banned
    Reputation: Live Steam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    14,685
    A side not to this - when it was time for his famous speech that included "Mr. Gorbachev tear down that wall!" His advisors removed that segment. They thought the language was too strong and intimidating. His response - "Last I checked I was the one elected president. Put it back in!" He certainly had a way of talking right to people. He knew how to temper his remarks with humor and forcefulness when required. He was Grandpa President.

    Though he was able to keep the politics on a civil level, many tried to vilify him in the press/media. Even yesterday, you could see the slant many wanted to give to some of his accomplishments and innitiatives. You could see it took effort for them to temper their remarks.

    I think Bush speaks across party lines in much the same way Reagan did. He has been under attack for the past 18 months yet he has never lost his cool. That's much more than can be said about Kerry.

  18. #18
    Opus was just napping
    Reputation: thatsmybush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    20,967
    Quote Originally Posted by Live Steam

    I think Bush speaks across party lines in much the same way Reagan did. He has been under attack for the past 18 months yet he has never lost his cool. That's much more than can be said about Kerry.

    In the famous words of Ronald Wilson Reagan. "Well...there you go again." Why don't you shelve the vitriol for a moment. In deference to the man I will not engage you in this obvious attempt to flame the thread.
    In the time of battle you don't rise to the occasion you resort to the level of your conditioning...

  19. #19
    banned
    Reputation: Live Steam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    14,685
    No one is looking to "flame the thread". There is not "vitriol" either. Can't you just accept someone's observation without getting into it yourself? I watched quite a bit of coverage of it yesterday, as I am sure many did, and I couldn't help but notice certain people such as Sam Donaldson making judgments, etc about Reagan's policies. They were not statements of fact presentes as an unbiased cronology of his political history. They were judgments on his policies. I guess these guys can't help themselves. It must be something akin to an occupational hazard. I was actually quite aware of the effort it took to temper their remarks. You could see it and hear it. That was my observation and I am entitled to it.


  20. #20
    AJS
    AJS is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AJS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    3,915
    And if it's Bob Novak, Bill O'Reilly, Sean Hannity, Tucker Carlson, Ann Coulter, et al waxing nostalgic on Ronnie Raygun, I don't suppose those are overly-positive "judgments on his policies" instead of purely "statements of fact"?

    No matter what anyone says about any Republican politician or their policies, if it's anything short of glowing praise you would have a problem with it.

    Your shtick is getting very old, LS.

  21. #21
    banned
    Reputation: Live Steam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    14,685
    The man died yesterday. Heaping praise is appropriate. Getting some last minute jabs in, is gauche.


  22. #22

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    732
    Quote Originally Posted by Live Steam
    The man died yesterday. Heaping praise is appropriate. Getting some last minute jabs in, is gauche.


    Last minute jabs would have been given before he died. Just because someone dies that does not entitle them to any respect, admiration, etc automatically. A figure such as he was controversial, and so those of us who are critical of the guy are noy gauche in criticizing him after death. It might be gauche at his funeral, but hey this is an open forum filled with people who did not know him personally - and plenty of others who did not like him or his policies. Let the criticism roll... how about the backward Middle East policy he started, and has been continued for 25 years. How about making the rich richer? How about $400 for a $7 hammer under his bloated military spending? Ah, I feel better now.

  23. #23

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    781

    Steam, I basically agree but honestly I wonder

    Quote Originally Posted by Live Steam
    The man died yesterday. Heaping praise is appropriate. Getting some last minute jabs in, is gauche.

    what would you post here tomorrow if Clinton died tonight? Seriously.
    In case you're wondering, my avatar is a photo of a worker in chains, rising up to cast them off. An old piece of IWW (Wobbly) art.

  24. #24
    RoadBikeReview Member
    Reputation: Acenturian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    329
    Quote Originally Posted by RedMenace
    what would you post here tomorrow if Clinton died tonight? Seriously.
    I'd pay my respects even though I completely disagreed with his politics. I'd give him credit for his speaking ability and for his laid back humor. I don't think flaming someone (even if you disagree with them or their views) right after their death is in good taste.

  25. #25

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    781

    Yeah, but you're not Clinton-obsessed like Steam.

    Quote Originally Posted by Acenturian
    I'd pay my respects even though I completely disagreed with his politics. I'd give him credit for his speaking ability and for his laid back humor. I don't think flaming someone (even if you disagree with them or their views) right after their death is in good taste.
    I agree with you, and I agree with what Steam said below. I just wonder if Steam could manage to say something good about Clinton, were he to die tonight. And what sort of "decent interval" he would observe before starting to bash him again.
    In case you're wondering, my avatar is a photo of a worker in chains, rising up to cast them off. An old piece of IWW (Wobbly) art.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT ROADBIKEREVIEW

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.